2005 NCAA Division I-A football season

Last updated
2005 NCAA Division I-A season
George W. Bush and Mack Brown with the 2005 Texas Longhorn football team.jpg
Texas team and coach Mack Brown with President George W. Bush after winning the 2005 national championship
Number of teams119
DurationSeptember 1December 3
Preseason AP No. 1 USC Trojans
Post-season
DurationDecember 20, 2005 –
January 4, 2006
Bowl games 28
Heisman Trophy Reggie Bush, USC RB
(vacated)
Bowl Championship Series
2006 Rose Bowl
Site Rose Bowl Stadium,
Pasadena, California
Winner Texas Longhorns
Division I-A football seasons
  2004
2006  

The 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season was the highest level of college football competition in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The regular season began on September 1, 2005 and ended on December 3, 2005. The postseason concluded on January 4, 2006 with the Rose Bowl, which served as the season's BCS National Championship Game. The USC Trojans and the Texas Longhorns finished the regular season as the only undefeated teams in Division I-A and consequently met in the Rose Bowl to play for the national title. Texas defeated USC largely due to the performance of quarterback Vince Young, who gained 467 yards of total offense and ran for three touchdowns. The Longhorns won their first national championship since 1970, and their first consensus national title since 1969.

The NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), formerly known as Division I-A, is the top level of college football in the United States. The FBS is the most competitive subdivision of NCAA Division I, which itself consists of the largest and most competitive schools in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). As of 2018, there are 10 conferences and 130 schools in FBS.

College football Collegiate rules version of American/Canadian football, played by colleges and universities

College football is gridiron football consisting of American football played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football rules first gained popularity in the United States.

National Collegiate Athletic Association American athletic organization

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is a nonprofit organization that regulates student athletes from 1,268 North American institutions and conferences. It also organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, and helps more than 480,000 college student-athletes who compete annually in college sports. The organization is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Contents

Rule changes

Conference changes

A major conference realignment occurred prior to the 2005 season, when 18 teams in Division 1-A changed conferences.

Temple was expelled from the Big East Conference while Army ended its brief affiliation with Conference USA, resulting in both schools becoming Independents.

Temple Owls football football team of Temple University

The Temple Owls football team represents Temple University in the sport of college football. The Temple Owls compete in the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision as a member of the American Athletic Conference. They play their home games at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Big East Conference (1979–2013) U.S. college athletic conference, 1979–2013

The Big East Conference was a collegiate athletics conference that consisted of as many as 16 universities in the eastern half of the United States from 1979 to 2013. The conference's members participated in 24 NCAA sports. The conference had a history of success at the national level in basketball throughout its history, while its shorter football program, created by inviting one college and four other "associate members" into the conference, resulted in two national championships.

Army Black Knights football

The Army Black Knights football team, previously known as the Army Cadets, represents the United States Military Academy in college football. Army is currently a Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) member of the NCAA. The Black Knights currently play home games in Michie Stadium with a capacity of 38,000 at West Point, New York. The Black Knights are coached by Jeff Monken who is in his sixth season as head coach. Army is a three-time national champion, winning the title from 1944–1946.

Boston College left the Big East to become the 12th member of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC), allowing the league to split into two divisions and hold an annual championship game.

The Boston College Eagles football team represents Boston College in the sport of American football. The Eagles compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). Formed in 1892, Boston College's football team was one of six "Major College" football programs in New England as designated by NCAA classifications, starting in 1938. By 1981, and for the remainder of the twentieth century, BC was New England's sole Division I-A program. It has amassed a 632–454–37 record and is 99–54 since the turn of the 21st century.

Atlantic Coast Conference American collegiate athletics conference

The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic conference in the United States of America in which its fifteen member universities compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)'s Division I, with its football teams competing in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the highest levels for athletic competition in US-based collegiate sports. The ACC sponsors competition in twenty-five sports with many of its member institutions' athletic programs held in high regard nationally. Current members of the conference are Boston College, Clemson University, Duke University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Florida State University, North Carolina State University, Syracuse University, the University of Louisville, the University of Miami, the University of North Carolina, the University of Notre Dame, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Virginia, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and Wake Forest University.

Cincinnati, Louisville and South Florida left Conference USA to join the Big East. Texas Christian University also left Conference USA to become the Mountain West Conference's ninth member.

Cincinnati Bearcats football football team of the University of Cincinnati

The Cincinnati Bearcats football program represents the University of Cincinnati in college football. They compete at the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision level as members of the American Athletic Conference, and have played their home games in historic Nippert Stadium since 1924. The Bearcats have an all-time record of over .500 as of 2018, having reached their 600th program victory in 2017. The team has had a bit of a resurgence in the past few years, going 98-56 since 2006, along with 9 bowl game appearances, 5 conference titles, two BCS Bowl berths, and 22 NFL Draft selections.

The Louisville Cardinals football team represents the University of Louisville in the sport of American football. The Cardinals compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference.

The South Florida Bulls football team represents the University of South Florida. The Bulls began playing in 1997 and currently compete in the American Athletic Conference of the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) within the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The team plays its home games at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida.

Despite its losses, Conference USA added six schools to increase its membership to twelve, poaching Marshall and UCF from the Mid-American Conference and Rice, Southern Methodist, Tulsa, and UTEP from the Western Athletic Conference (WAC). Like the ACC, Conference USA split into two divisions and started a conference championship game.

Marshall Thundering Herd football Football team of Marshall University

The Marshall Thundering Herd football team is an intercollegiate varsity sports program of Marshall University. The team represents the university as a member of the Conference USA Eastern division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, playing at the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision level.

UCF Knights football football team representing the University of Central Florida

The UCF Knights football team represents The University of Central Florida (UCF) in the sport of American football. The Knights compete in the Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the East Division of the American Athletic Conference. Their current head coach is Josh Heupel, formerly a player and coach at Oklahoma and offensive coordinator at Missouri. The Knights play their home games at the 44,206-seat Spectrum Stadium, which is located on UCF's main campus in Orlando, Florida, United States.

Mid-American Conference U.S. college sports conference

The Mid-American Conference (MAC) is a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I collegiate athletic conference with a membership base in the Great Lakes region that stretches from Western New York to Illinois. Nine of the twelve full member schools are in Ohio and Michigan, with single members located in Illinois, Indiana, and New York. For football, the MAC participates in the NCAA's Football Bowl Subdivision.

The Western Athletic Conference added Idaho, New Mexico State and Utah State from the Sun Belt Conference.

The Sun Belt picked up I-AA Independents Florida Atlantic and Florida International.

School2004 Conference2005 Conference
Army Black Knights Conference USA I-A Independent
Boston College Eagles Big East ACC
Central Florida Knights MAC Conference USA
Cincinnati Bearcats Conference USA Big East
Louisville Cardinals Conference USA Big East
Marshall Thundering Herd MAC Conference USA
Florida Atlantic Owls I-AA Independent Sun Belt
Florida International Panthers I-AA Independent Sun Belt
Idaho Vandals Sun Belt WAC
New Mexico State Aggies Sun Belt WAC
Rice Owls WAC Conference USA
South Florida Bulls Conference USA Big East
SMU Mustangs WAC Conference USA
Temple Owls Big East Conference I-A Independent
TCU Horned Frogs Conference USA Mountain West
Tulsa Golden Hurricane WAC Conference USA
Utah State Aggies Sun Belt WAC
UTEP Miners WAC Conference USA

Coaching changes

Steve Spurrier as coach at the University of Florida Steve Spurrier 2006-09-02.jpg
Steve Spurrier as coach at the University of Florida

Steve Spurrier returned to college coaching for the first time since 2001 after a stint in the NFL, leading South Carolina to a respectable 7–5 season. Urban Meyer, after leading Utah to an undefeated season in 2004, took over at Florida (Spurrier's old school). Charlie Weis left the New England Patriots to become head coach at alma mater Notre Dame, taking the team to a BCS bowl.

Longtime head coaches Barry Alvarez of Wisconsin and Bill Snyder of Kansas State, both of whom took struggling programs to national prominence during their tenures, retired. Dan Hawkins, having helped make Boise State a powerhouse in the Western Athletic Conference, left the Broncos to coach struggling Colorado.

Conference standings

2005 ACC football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
Atlantic Division
No. 23 Florida State xy$ 53    85 
No. 18 Boston College x 53    93 
No. 21 Clemson  44    84 
Wake Forest  35    47 
NC State  35    75 
Maryland  35    56 
Coastal Division
No. 7 Virginia Tech x 71    112 
No. 17 Miami  62    93 
Georgia Tech  53    75 
North Carolina  44    56 
Virginia  35    75 
Duke  08    110 

Championship: Florida State 27, Virginia Tech 22
  • $ BCS representative as conference champion
  • x Division champion/co-champions
  • y Championship game participant
Rankings from AP Poll
2005 Big East football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 5 West Virginia $ 70    111 
No. 19 Louisville  52    93 
Rutgers  43    75 
South Florida  43    66 
Pittsburgh  43    56 
Connecticut  25    56 
Cincinnati  25    47 
Syracuse  07    110 
  • $ BCS representative as conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
2005 Big Ten football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 3 Penn State $+ 71    111 
No. 4 Ohio State %+ 71    102 
No. 15 Wisconsin  53    103 
Michigan  53    75 
Northwestern  53    75 
Iowa  53    75 
Minnesota  44    75 
Purdue  35    56 
Michigan State  26    56 
Indiana  17    47 
Illinois  08    29 
  • $ BCS representative as conference champion
  • % BCS at-large representative
  • + Conference co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll
2005 Big 12 football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
Northern Division
Colorado x 53    76 
No. 24 Nebraska  44    84 
Iowa State  44    75 
Missouri  44    75 
Kansas  35    75 
Kansas State  26    56 
Southern Division
No. 1 Texas x$# 80    130 
No. 20 Texas Tech  62    93 
No. 22 Oklahoma  62    84 
Texas A&M  35    56 
Baylor  26    56 
Oklahoma State  17    47 
Championship: Texas 70, Colorado 3
  • # BCS National Champion
  • $ BCS representative as conference champion
  • x Division champion/co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll
2005 Conference USA football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
East Division
UCF x 71    85 
Southern Miss  53    75 
Memphis  53    75 
East Carolina  44    56 
Marshall  35    47 
UAB  35    56 
West Division
Tulsa x$ 62    94 
UTEP  53    84 
Houston  44    66 
SMU  44    56 
Tulane  17    29 
Rice  17    110 
Championship: Tulsa 44, Central Florida 27
  • $ Conference champion
  • x Division champion/co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll
2005 Mid-American Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
East Division
Akron xy$ 53    76 
Miami x 53    74 
Bowling Green x 53    65 
Ohio  35    47 
Buffalo  17    110 
Kent State  08    110 
West Division
Northern Illinois xy 62    75 
Toledo x 62    93 
Western Michigan  53    74 
Central Michigan  53    65 
Ball State  44    47 
Eastern Michigan  35    47 
Championship: Akron 31, NIU 30
  • $ Conference champion
  • x Division champion/co-champions
2005 Mountain West football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 11 TCU $ 80    111 
BYU  53    66 
Colorado State  53    66 
Utah  44    75 
New Mexico  44    65 
San Diego State  44    57 
Air Force  35    47 
Wyoming  26    47 
UNLV  17    29 
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
2005 Pacific-10 football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 2 USC † $ 80    121 
No. 13 Oregon  71    102 
No. 16 UCLA  62    102 
No. 25 California  44    84 
Arizona State  44    75 
Stanford  44    56 
Oregon State  35    56 
Arizona  26    38 
Washington State  17    47 
Washington  17    29 
  • $ Conference champion
  • † – USC later vacated 12 wins (8 in conference) due to NCAA sanctions.
Rankings from AP Poll
2005 SEC football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
Eastern Division
No. 10 Georgia x$ 62    103 
South Carolina  53    75 
No. 12 Florida  53    93 
Vanderbilt  35    56 
Tennessee  35    56 
Kentucky  26    38 
Western Division
No. 5 LSU xy 71    112 
No. 14 Auburn x 71    93 
No. 8 Alabama  62    102 
Arkansas  26    47 
Mississippi State  17    38 
Ole Miss  17    38 
Championship: Georgia 34, LSU 14
  • $ BCS representative as conference champion
  • x Division champion/co-champions
  • y Championship game participant
  • Alabama had all victories vacated by the NCAA in 2010. As such, the official record for Alabama is 0–2 (0–2).
Rankings from AP Poll
2005 Sun Belt football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
Arkansas State + 52    66 
Louisiana–Lafayette + 52    65 
Louisiana–Monroe + 52    56 
FIU  34    56 
Middle Tennessee  34    47 
Troy  34    47 
Florida Atlantic  25    29 
North Texas  25    29 
  • + Conference co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll
2005 WAC football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
Boise State + 71    94 
Nevada + 71    93 
Louisiana Tech  62    74 
Fresno State  62    85 
Hawaii  44    57 
San Jose State  26    38 
Utah State  26    38 
Idaho  26    29 
New Mexico State  08    012 
  • + Conference co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll
2005 Division I-A independents football records
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 9 Notre Dame %     93 
Navy      84 
Army      47 
Temple      011 
  • % BCS at-large representative
Rankings from AP Poll

Bowl games

BCS bowls

Other New Year's Day bowls

December bowl games

Awards and honors

Heisman Trophy controversy

Heisman Trophy voting was primarily for three players: Reggie Bush, Matt Leinart (who won the trophy in 2004) and Vince Young. Bush won the trophy, with Young (who helped Texas win their first national championship since 1970) second in the voting:

  1. Reggie Bush, Jr. USC TB (2,541 points)
  2. Vince Young, Jr. Texas QB (1,608)
  3. Matt Leinart, Sr. USC QB (797)
  4. Brady Quinn Jr. Notre Dame QB (191)
  5. Michael Robinson, Sr. Penn State QB (49)

In June 2010 the NCAA ruled that Bush had received "improper benefits", violating NCAA policy. On September 14, he announced in a statement from the New Orleans Saints that he would forfeit his 2005 Heisman Trophy. Runner-up Vince Young said that he would not accept the trophy if Bush forfeited it. On September 15, the Heisman Trust announced that the 2005 trophy would be vacated and there would be no winner for the season. [1]

Major award winners

    All-Americans

    2005 Consensus All-America team

    Offense
    PositionNameHeightWeight (lbs.)ClassHometownTeam
    QB Vince Young 6'5"229Jr. Houston, Texas Texas
    RB Reggie Bush 6'0"200Jr. Spring Valley, California USC
    RB Jerome Harrison 5'10"199Sr. Kalamazoo, Michigan Washington State
    WR Dwayne Jarrett 6'5"210So. New Brunswick, New Jersey USC
    WR Jeff Samardzija 6'5"218Jr. Valparaiso, Indiana Notre Dame
    TE Marcedes Lewis 6'6"256Sr. Lakewood, California UCLA
    T Jonathan Scott 6'7"315Sr. Dallas, Texas Texas
    T Marcus McNeill 6'9"338Sr. Decatur, Georgia Auburn
    G Deuce Lutui 6'6"370Sr. Mesa, Arizona USC
    G Max Jean-Gilles 6'4"355Sr. North Miami Beach, Florida Georgia
    C Greg Eslinger 6'3"292Sr. Bismarck, North Dakota Minnesota
    Defense
    PositionNameHeightWeight (lbs.)ClassHometownTeam
    DE Tamba Hali 6'3"275Sr. Teaneck, New Jersey Penn State
    DT Haloti Ngata 6'4"338Sr. Salt Lake City, Utah Oregon
    DT Rodrique Wright 6'5"315Sr.Houston, Texas Texas
    DE Elvis Dumervil 6'0"256Sr. Miami, Florida Louisville
    LB A. J. Hawk 6'1"248Sr. Centerville, Ohio Ohio State
    LB DeMeco Ryans 6'1"236Sr. Bessemer, Alabama Alabama
    LB Paul Posluszny 6'2"238Jr. Hopewell Township, Pennsylvania Penn State
    CB Jimmy Williams 6'3"216Sr. Hampton, Virginia Virginia Tech
    CB Tye Hill 5'10"185Sr. Dorchester, South Carolina Clemson
    Safety Michael Huff 6'0"204Sr. Irving, Texas Texas
    Safety Greg Blue 6'2"216Sr. Atlanta Georgia
    Special teams
    PositionNameHeightWeight (lbs.)ClassHometownTeam
    Kicker Mason Crosby 6'2"215Jr. Georgetown, Texas Colorado
    Punter Ryan Plackemeier 6'3"235Sr. Bonsall, California Wake Forest
    RS Maurice Drew 5'8"205Jr. Antioch, California UCLA

    Highest-scoring team

    Texas scored the most points (652). [4] [5]

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    1999 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 1999 NCAA Division I-A football season saw Florida State named national champions, defeating Virginia Tech in the BCS Sugar Bowl.

    2000 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 2000 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with the Oklahoma Sooners claiming their first national championship and their first conference championship since the departure of head coach Barry Switzer.

    2001 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 2001 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with the University of Miami winning the national title for the fifth time.

    2002 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with a double overtime national championship game. Ohio State and Miami both came into the Fiesta Bowl undefeated. The underdog Buckeyes defeated the defending-champion Hurricanes 31–24, ending Miami's 34-game winning streak. Jim Tressel won the national championship in only his second year as head coach.

    2003 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 2003 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with an abundance of controversy, resulting in a split national championship. This was the first split title since the inception of the BCS, something the BCS intended to eliminate.

    2004 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 2004 NCAA Division I-A football season was the highest level of college football competition in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The regular season began on August 28, 2004 and ended on December 4, 2004. The postseason concluded on January 4, 2005 with the Orange Bowl, which served as the season's BCS National Championship Game.

    2006 Rose Bowl annual NCAA football game

    The 2006 Rose Bowl Game, played on January 4, 2006 at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California, was an American college football bowl game that served as the BCS National Championship Game for the 2005 College Football season. It featured the only two unbeaten teams of the 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season: the defending Rose Bowl champion and reigning Big 12 Conference champion Texas Longhorns played Pacific-10 Conference titleholders and two-time defending AP national champions, the USC Trojans.

    The 2005 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California in the 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season, winning the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10), and playing for the NCAA Division I-A national championship. The team was coached by Pete Carroll, led on offense by quarterback and 2004 Heisman Trophy winner Matt Leinart, and played their home games in the Los Angeles Coliseum.

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    2005 Orange Bowl annual NCAA football game

    The 2005 Orange Bowl was the BCS National Championship Game of the 2004 NCAA Division I-A football season and was played on January 4, 2005 at Pro Player Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida. The game matched the USC Trojans against the Oklahoma Sooners. Both teams entered with undefeated, 12–0 records. Despite only being 1 point favorites, USC defeated Oklahoma by a score of 55–19, led by quarterback Matt Leinart. ESPN named Leinart's performance as one of the top-10 performances in the first ten years of the BCS system.

    The 2004 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California in the 2004 NCAA Division I-A football season. Although now vacated for breaking NCAA rules, the team won the 2004 BCS National Championship by winning the 2005 Orange Bowl, that year's BCS National Championship Game. The team also won the AP title for the second year in a row. It was the Trojans' first undisputed national championship since 1972, and the second time a team had gone wire-to-wire, with the Trojans holding the number 1 spot in the polls all season. The team was coached by Pete Carroll in his fourth year with the Trojans, and played their home games in the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.

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    References

    1. "Heisman Trust: 2005 award will be vacated". Chicago Tribune. September 15, 2010. Archived from the original on 19 September 2010. Retrieved 16 September 2010.
    2. 1 2 Vacated due to ineligibility.
    3. The AP does not vacate titles removed ineligible teams or players.
    4. 2005 College Football Team Offense (Sports Reference)
    5. 2005 Texas Longhorns Stats (Sports-Reference)