Big Ten Conference

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Big Ten Conference
Big Ten Conference logo (2012).svg
FormerlyIntercollegiate Conference of Faculty Representatives
(officially, 1896–1987)
Western Conference
(1896–1899)
Big Nine
(1899–1917, 1946–1950)
Association NCAA
Founded1896;128 years ago (1896)
Commissioner Tony Petitti
Sports fielded
  • 28
    • men's: 14
    • women's: 14
Division Division I
Subdivision FBS
No. of teams14 (18 in 2024)
Headquarters Rosemont, Illinois, U.S.
Region
Official website bigten.org
Locations
Big 10 Map.svg

The Big Ten Conference (stylized B1G, formerly the Western Conference and the Big Nine Conference) is the oldest Division I collegiate athletic conference in the United States. Founded as the Intercollegiate Conference of Faculty Representatives in 1896, it predates the founding of its regulating organization, the NCAA. It is based in the Chicago area in Rosemont, Illinois. For many decades the conference consisted of 10 prominent universities, which accounts for its name. As of 2014, it consists of 14 member institutions and 2 affiliate institutions, with 4 new member institutions scheduled to join in 2024. [1] [2] The conference competes in the NCAA Division I and its football teams compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), formerly known as Division I-A, the highest level of NCAA competition in that sport.

Contents

Big Ten member institutions are major research universities with large financial endowments and strong academic reputations. A large student body is a hallmark of its universities, as 12 of the 14 members enroll more than 30,000 students. They are all public universities except founding member Northwestern University as the lone private university, but will be joined by private University of Southern California at the beginning of the 2024–25 collegiate athletic year. Collectively, Big Ten universities educate more than 520,000 total students and have 5.7 million living alumni. [1] The members engage in $9.3 billion in funded research each year; [2] 13 out of 14 are members of the Association of American Universities and all are members of the Universities Research Association (URA). All Big Ten universities are also members of the Big Ten Academic Alliance, formerly the Committee on Institutional Cooperation. [3]

Although the Big Ten has primarily been a Midwestern conference for nearly a century, the conference's geographic footprint has extended from the Mid-Atlantic to the Great Plains since 2014, and will also have a presence in the West Coast with the addition of four former Pac-12 Conference schools in 2024. [4]

Member universities

Current full members

Overview of full members of the Big Ten Conference
DivisionInstitutionLocationFoundedJoinedTypeEnrollment [5] Endowment (millions)NicknameColors
East Division Indiana University Bloomington Bloomington, Indiana 18201899 [lower-alpha 1] Public47,005$3,317 Hoosiers    
University of Maryland, College Park College Park, Maryland 18562014Public (land-grant)40,792$997 [6] Terrapins        
University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 18171896,
1917 [lower-alpha 2]
Public51,225$17,022 Wolverines    
Michigan State University East Lansing, Michigan 18551950 [lower-alpha 3] Public (land-grant)50,023$4,338 Spartans    
Ohio State University Columbus, Ohio 1870191260,540$6,814 Buckeyes    
Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania 18551990 [lower-alpha 4] 50,028$4,613 Nittany Lions    
Rutgers University–New Brunswick New BrunswickPiscataway, New Jersey 1766201450,637$2,000 Scarlet Knights  
West Division University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Champaign-Urbana, Illinois [lower-alpha 5] 18671896Public (land-grant)56,916$3,380 Fighting Illini    
University of Iowa Iowa City, Iowa 18471899 [lower-alpha 6] Public30,015$3,137 Hawkeyes    
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota 18511896Public (land-grant)54,955$5,443 Golden Gophers    
University of Nebraska–Lincoln Lincoln, Nebraska 1869201123,805$2,310 Cornhuskers    
Northwestern University Evanston, Illinois 18511896Private not-for-profit (non-sectarian)23,161$14,958 Wildcats    
Purdue University West Lafayette, Indiana 1869Public (land-grant)45,869$3,584 Boilermakers    
University of Wisconsin–Madison Madison, Wisconsin 184851,528$3,981 Badgers    

Notes:

  1. Athletic teams started competing in the conference effective the 1900–01 school year.
  2. In April 1907, Michigan was voted out of the conference for refusing to adhere to league rules limiting football teams to no more than five games and players to three years of eligibility. Consequently, its athletic teams were independent from 1907–08 to 1916–17.
  3. Athletic teams started competing in the conference effective with the 1953–54 school year.
  4. Most sports teams started competing in the conference in the 1991–92 school year; football started Big Ten play in 1993.
  5. The overall university administration is in Urbana; the athletic administration is in Champaign.
  6. Athletic teams started competing in the conference effective the 1900–01 school year.

Membership map

Big Ten Conference (Midwest and Mid-Atlantic)

Future members

Big Ten Conference (Western)
Big Ten Conference
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32
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31
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30
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Location of Big Ten Future Full members:
29
USC
30
UCLA
31
Oregon
32
Washington

On June 30, 2022, the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and the University of Southern California (USC) announced plans to withdraw from the Pac-12 Conference to join the Big Ten in 2024 as full members. [7] On August 4, 2023, the University of Oregon and the University of Washington also announced their withdrawal from the Pac-12 to join the Big Ten on August 2, 2024. [8] Most NCAA conferences, including the Big Ten, start their operating years on July 1, but the Pac-12 starts its operating year on August 2.

Overview of upcoming members of the Big Ten Conference
InstitutionLocationFoundedJoin dateTypeEnrollmentEndowment
(millions)
NicknameColorsFormer
affiliation
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Los Angeles, California 19192024Public (land-grant)45,900$3,892 Bruins     Pac-12
University of Oregon Eugene, Oregon 1876Public23,202$1,405 Ducks    
University of Southern California (USC) Los Angeles, California 1880Private not-for-profit (non-sectarian)49,500$8,120 Trojans    
University of Washington Seattle, Washington 1861Public49,522$4,940 Huskies    

Affiliate members

Big Ten Conference affiliate members
Big Ten Conference
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Location Big Ten affiliate members:
37
Johns Hopkins
38
Notre Dame
Overview of affiliate members of the Big Ten Conference
InstitutionLocationFoundedJoinedTypeEnrollmentNicknameColorsBig Ten sport(s)Primary conference
Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, Maryland 18762014Private not-for-profit (Non-sectarian)29,094 Blue Jays    men's lacrosse [lower-alpha 1] Centennial (NCAA D-III)
women's lacrosse [lower-alpha 2]
University of Notre Dame Notre Dame, Indiana 18422017Private not-for-profit (Catholic)12,472 Fighting Irish    men's ice hockey ACC

Notes

  1. On July 1, 2014, Johns Hopkins University joined the conference as an affiliate member in men's lacrosse.
  2. On July 1, 2016, Johns Hopkins University became an affiliate member in women's lacrosse.

Former member

The University of Chicago was the only full member to have left the Big Ten Conference. [lower-alpha 1]

Overview of former members of the Big Ten Conference
InstitutionLocationFoundedJoinedLeftTypeEnrollmentNicknameColorsCurrent
conference
University of Chicago Chicago, Illinois 189018961946 [lower-alpha 2] Private not-for-profit (Non-sectarian)17,470 Maroons     UAA (NCAA D-III)
Notes
  1. Lake Forest College attended the original 1895 meeting that led to the formation of the conference, but never participated in athletics or any other activities.
  2. The University of Chicago was a co-founder of the conference. The school dropped football after the 1939 fall season (1939–40 school year), but remained a member in other sports until the end of the 1945–46 academic year. [9]

Membership timeline

University of WashingtonPac-12 ConferencePac-12 ConferencePac-12 ConferencePac-12 ConferencePacific Coast ConferenceNorthwest Intercollegiate Athletic AssociationUniversity of OregonPac-12 ConferencePac-12 ConferencePac-12 ConferencePac-12 ConferencePacific Coast ConferenceNorthwest Intercollegiate Athletic AssociationNorthwest Intercollegiate Athletic AssociationUniversity of Southern CaliforniaPac-12 ConferencePac-12 ConferencePac-12 ConferencePac-12 ConferencePacific Coast ConferenceUCLAPac-12 ConferencePac-12 ConferencePac-12 ConferencePac-12 ConferencePacific Coast ConferenceSouthern California Intercollegiate Athletic ConferenceUniversity of Notre DameJohns Hopkins UniversityRutgers University–New BrunswickAmerican Athletic ConferenceBig East Conference (1979–2013)Atlantic 10 ConferenceMiddle Atlantic ConferenceUniversity of Maryland, College ParkAtlantic Coast ConferenceSouthern ConferenceUniversity of Nebraska-LincolnBig 12 ConferenceBig Eight ConferenceBig Eight ConferencePennsylvania State UniversityAtlantic 10 ConferenceNCAA Division I FBS independent schoolsAtlantic 10 ConferenceMichigan State UniversityMichigan Intercollegiate Athletic AssociationOhio State UniversityUniversity of IowaIndiana University BloomingtonUniversity Athletic AssociationMidwest ConferenceUniversity of ChicagoUniversity of MichiganUniversity of Wisconsin–MadisonPurdue UniversityNorthwestern UniversityUniversity of MinnesotaUniversity of Illinois Urbana-ChampaignBig Ten Conference

Full members Full members (non-football) Sport affiliate Other conference Other conference 

History

Early history

As intercollegiate football rapidly increased during the 1890s, so did the ruthless nature of the game. Tempers flared, fights erupted, and injuries soared. Between 1880 and 1905, college football players suffered more than 325 deaths and 1,149 injuries. To deal with mounting criticism of the game, Purdue University president James Henry Smart [10] invited the presidents of the University of Chicago, University of Illinois, Lake Forest College, University of Minnesota, Northwestern University, and University of Wisconsin to a meeting in Chicago on January 11, 1895, to create policies aimed at regulating intercollegiate athletics. The eligibility of student-athletes was one of the main topics of discussion. [11] The Intercollegiate Conference of Faculty Representatives was founded at a second meeting on February 8, 1896. [12] Lake Forest was not at the 1896 meeting and was replaced by the University of Michigan. At the time, the organization was more commonly known as the Western Conference, consisting of Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Chicago, Purdue, and Northwestern. These schools were the original seven members.

The conference is one of the nation's oldest, predating the founding of the NCAA by a decade and was one of the first collegiate conferences to sponsor men's basketball.

The first reference to the conference as the Big Nine was in 1899 after Iowa and Indiana had joined. Nebraska first petitioned to join the league in 1900 and again in 1911, [13] but was turned away both times.

In 1905, the conference was officially incorporated as the "Intercollegiate Conference of Faculty Representatives". [10]

In April 1907, Michigan was voted out of the conference for refusing to adhere to league rules limiting football teams to no more than five games and players to three years of eligibility. [14] Ohio State joined in 1912. The first known references to the conference as the Big Ten were in December 1916, when Michigan rejoined the conference after a nine-year absence. [15] [16]

1940s: Chicago Leaves and Michigan State Joins

The conference was again known as the Big Nine after the University of Chicago decided to de-emphasize varsity athletics just after World War II. In 1939 UChicago President Robert Maynard Hutchins made the decision to abolish the football program, based on his negative views of big-time college football's excesses and associated problems of the time. [17] Chicago withdrew from the conference in 1946 after struggling to obtain victories in many conference matchups. It was believed that one of several schools, notably Iowa State, Marquette, Michigan State, Nebraska, Notre Dame, and Pittsburgh would replace Chicago at the time. [18] On May 20, 1949, [12] Michigan State ended the speculation by joining and the conference was again known as the Big Ten.[ clarification needed ] The Big Ten's membership would remain unchanged for the next 40 years. The conference's official name throughout this period remained the Intercollegiate Conference of Faculty Representatives. It did not formally adopt the name Big Ten until 1987, when it was incorporated as a not-for-profit corporation.

1990 expansion: Penn State

Big Ten logo (1990-2011). To reflect the addition of the 11th school, Penn State, the number 11 was placed in the negative space of the "Big Ten" lettering. Big Ten Conference former logo.svg
Big Ten logo (1990–2011). To reflect the addition of the 11th school, Penn State, the number 11 was placed in the negative space of the "Big Ten" lettering.

In 1990, the Big Ten universities voted to expand the conference to 11 teams and extended an invitation to Atlantic 10 member and football independent Pennsylvania State University, which accepted it. [19] When Penn State joined in 1990, it was decided the conference would continue to be called the Big Ten, but its logo was modified to reflect the change; the number 11 was disguised in the negative space of the traditionally blue "Big Ten" lettering.

Missouri showed interest in Big Ten membership after Penn State joined. [20] Around 1993, the league explored adding Kansas, Missouri and Rutgers or other potential schools, to create a 14-team league with two football divisions. [21] These talks died when the Big Eight Conference merged with former Southwest Conference members to create the Big 12.

Following the addition of Penn State, efforts were made to encourage the University of Notre Dame, at that time the last remaining non-service academy independent, to join the league. In 1999, Notre Dame and the Big Ten entered into private negotiations concerning a possible membership that would include Notre Dame. Although Notre Dame's faculty senate endorsed the idea with a near-unanimous vote, the school's board of trustees decided against joining the conference. [22] (In 1926, Notre Dame had briefly considered official entry into the Big Ten but chose to retain its independent status. [23] ) Notre Dame subsequently joined the Atlantic Coast Conference in all sports except football, in which Notre Dame maintains its independent status as long as it plays at least five games per season against ACC opponents. This was believed to be the major stumbling block to Notre Dame joining the Big Ten, as Notre Dame wanted to retain its independent home game broadcasting contract with NBC Sports, while the Big Ten insisted upon a full membership with no special exemptions.

2010–2014 expansion: Nebraska, Maryland, Rutgers

In December 2009, Big Ten Conference commissioner Jim Delany announced that the league was looking to expand in what would later be part of a nationwide trend as part of the 2010–2014 NCAA conference realignment. [24] On June 11, 2010, the University of Nebraska applied for membership in the Big Ten and was unanimously approved as the conference's 12th school, which became effective July 1, 2011. [25] The conference retained the name "Big Ten". This briefly led to the interesting and ironic result of the Big Ten consisting of twelve teams, and the Big 12 consisting of ten teams (with fellow former Big 12 member Colorado's move to the Pac-12 Conference). As part of the agreement to join the Big Ten, Nebraska would not receive a full share of the media revenue for the first six years of its membership, until fall 2017. [26]

Legends and Leaders divisions

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Indiana
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Michigan
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Michigan State
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Ohio
State
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Penn
State
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Illinois
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Iowa
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Minnesota
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Nebraska
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Northwestern
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Purdue
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Wisconsin
Big Ten (2011-2013): Blue pog.svg Legends Division, Green pog.svg Leaders Division

On September 1, 2010, Delany revealed the conference's football divisional split, but noted that the division names would be announced later. Those division names, as well as the conference's new logo, were made public on December 13, 2010. For its new logo, the conference replaced the "hidden 11" logo with one that uses the "B1G" character combination in its branding. Delany did not comment on the logo that day, but it was immediately evident that the new logo would "allow fans to see 'BIG' and '10' in a single word." [27]

For the new football division names, the Big Ten was unable to use geographic names, because they had rejected a geographic arrangement. Delany announced that the new divisions would be known as the "Legends Division" and "Leaders Division". In the Legends division were Iowa, Michigan, Michigan State, Minnesota, Nebraska and Northwestern. The Leaders division was composed of Illinois, Indiana, Ohio State, Penn State, Purdue and Wisconsin. Conference officials stated they had focused on creating competitive fairness rather than splitting by geographical location. [28] However, the new "Legends" and "Leaders" divisions were not met with enthusiasm. Some traditional rivals, including Ohio State and Michigan, were placed in separate divisions. [29]

For the football season, each team played the others in its division, one "cross-over" rivalry game, and two rotating cross-divisional games. At the end of the regular season the two division winners met in a new Big Ten Football Championship Game. [30] The Legends and Leaders divisional alignment was in effect for the 2011, 2012 and 2013 football seasons.

Maryland and Rutgers join

On November 19, 2012, the University of Maryland's Board of Regents voted to withdraw from the ACC and join the Big Ten as its 13th member effective on July 1, 2014. [31] The Big Ten's Council of Presidents approved the move later that day. [32] One day later, Rutgers University of the Big East also accepted an offer for membership from the Big Ten as its 14th member school. [33] Like Nebraska, both schools would not receive full shares of the media revenue until six years after they joined. However, both schools took loans from the conference, thus pushing back the date they would receive full shares. [26]

West and East divisions

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Indiana
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Maryland
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Michigan
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Michigan State
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Ohio
State
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Penn
State
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Rutgers
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Illinois
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Iowa
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Minnesota
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Nebraska
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Northwestern
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Purdue
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Wisconsin
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USC
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UCLA
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Oregon
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Washington
Location of Big Ten members: Blue pog.svg Full Member – East Division, Green pog.svg Full Member – West Division, Gold pog.svg Future Members

On April 28, 2013, the Big Ten presidents and chancellors unanimously approved a football divisional realignment that went into effect when Maryland and Rutgers joined in 2014. [34] Under the new plan, the Legends and Leaders divisions were replaced with geographic divisions. [34] The West Division includes Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, Northwestern, Purdue and Wisconsin (of which all but Purdue are in the Central Time Zone), while the East Division includes Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Michigan State, Ohio State, Penn State and Rutgers (all of which are in the Eastern Time Zone). The final issue in determining the new divisions was which of the two Indiana schools would be sent to the West; Purdue was chosen because its West Lafayette campus is geographically west of Indiana's home city of Bloomington. [35] The divisional alignment permanently protected the cross-divisional football rivalry Indiana–Purdue. [34] As before, the two division winners play each other in the Big Ten Football Championship Game.

Affiliate members join

On June 3, 2013, the Big Ten announced the sponsorship of men's and women's lacrosse. For any conference to qualify for an automatic bid to the NCAA tournament, at least six member schools must play the sport. In women's lacrosse, the addition of Maryland and Rutgers to the Big Ten brought the conference up to the requisite six participants, joining programs at Michigan, Northwestern, Ohio State and Penn State. [36] In men's lacrosse, Ohio State and Penn State were the only existing participants. Coincident with the addition of Maryland and Rutgers, Michigan agreed to upgrade its successful club team to varsity status, giving the Big Ten five sponsoring schools, one short of the minimum six for an automatic bid. Johns Hopkins University opted to join the conference as its first affiliate member beginning in 2014. Johns Hopkins had been independent in men's lacrosse for 130 years, claiming 44 national championships. [37] As long-time independents joined conferences (for example, Syracuse joining the Atlantic Coast Conference), other schools competing as independents in some cases concluded that the inability to earn an automatic bid to the NCAA tournament was becoming a more serious competitive disadvantage in scheduling and recruiting.

On March 23, 2016, the Big Ten Conference and Notre Dame announced the Fighting Irish would become a men's ice hockey affiliate beginning with the 2017–18 season. [38] Notre Dame had been a member of Hockey East, and the move would save travel time and renew rivalries with former CCHA and WCHA members.

The conference's headquarters in Rosemont, Illinois Big 10 HQ (21617731102).jpg
The conference's headquarters in Rosemont, Illinois

In 2013, the conference moved its headquarters from its location in Park Ridge, Illinois to neighboring Rosemont. The office building is situated within Rosemont's Parkway Bank Park Entertainment District (then named MB Financial Park Entertainment District), alongside Interstate 294. [39] [40] [41]

2021–2024 Pacific Expansion

On June 30, 2022, UCLA and USC announced that they will be joining the Big Ten Conference effective August 2, 2024, enabling both schools to remain in the Pac-12 Conference for the duration of the Pac-12's existing media rights agreements. [7] [42] Unlike the prior expansion with Nebraska, Rutgers, and Maryland, USC and UCLA would join with a full share of the media revenue from the start of their Big Ten tenure. [26]

In August 2022, the conference reached new media rights deals with CBS, Fox, and NBC totaled at an estimated $7 billion. [43] [44] [45] [46]

On August 4, 2023, Oregon and Washington announced that they would join the Big Ten Conference alongside UCLA and USC. [47] Unlike UCLA and USC, the two schools would receive a reduced media revenue share of $30 million each, with the share increasing by $1 million for each school each year, through the 2029-30 season. Rather than reducing the other conference members' revenue shares, Fox is contributing the necessary money. [48] The schools will receive a full share with the next media deal. [49]

Football: the return of no divisions

In June 2023 – after UCLA and USC were confirmed as incoming members but before Oregon and Washington were added – the conference announced that starting in 2024, the East and West divisions for football would be eliminated. Each team would play nine conference games and three non-conference games, as before. Within a four-year period, each team would play at least two games against every other team – one at home and one away. This plan called for 11 protected matchups to take place every year; these included Michigan–Ohio State and ten other regional rivalries. At the end of each season, the top two teams in the conference standings would oppose each other in the Big Ten Football Championship Game. [50]

The addition of Oregon and Washington added one more protected matchup to this count, bringing the total to 12 protected matchups: Illinois-Northwestern, Illinois-Purdue, Indiana-Purdue, Iowa-Minnesota, Iowa-Nebraska, Iowa-Wisconsin, Maryland-Rutgers, Michigan-Michigan State, Michigan-Ohio State, Minnesota-Wisconsin, Oregon-Washington and UCLA-USC, leaving Penn State as the lone school with no protected matchups. The schedule was also updated so that teams will play every other conference opponent at least twice – once home and once away – and will play rotating opponents no more than three times in a five-year period. [51]

Academics

All current and future members of the Big Ten are doctorate-granting universities.

Former conference commissioner Jim Delany said in 2010 that membership in the Association of American Universities is "an important part of who we are." [52] All current and future members of the Big Ten, other than the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, are members of the AAU. Nebraska was a member of the AAU when it was admitted to the Big Ten, but lost this status shortly afterwards. [52]

The following table shows National University rank by U.S. News & World Report as of 2023. [53]

Also indicated is membership in the Association of American Universities. [54]

  Members joining in 2024.

Academics at members of the Big Ten Conference
InstitutionNational university rankAAU memberAcademic term
Northwestern University 9YesQuarter
University of California, Los Angeles 15YesQuarter
University of Michigan 21YesSemester
University of Southern California 28YesSemester
University of Wisconsin-Madison 35YesSemester
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 35YesSemester
Rutgers University 40YesSemester
Ohio State University 43YesSemester
Purdue University 43YesSemester
University of Maryland, College Park 46YesSemester
University of Washington 40YesQuarter
University of Minnesota 53YesSemester
Indiana University Bloomington 73YesSemester
Pennsylvania State University 60YesSemester
Michigan State University 60YesSemester
University of Iowa 93YesSemester
University of Oregon 98YesQuarter
University of Nebraska-Lincoln 159NoSemester

Commissioners

The office of the commissioner of athletics was created in 1922 "to study athletic problems of the various member universities and assist in enforcing the eligibility rules which govern Big Ten athletics." [11]

Commissioners of the Big Ten Conference
NameYearsNotes
John L. Griffith 1922–1944Died in office
Kenneth L. "Tug" Wilson 1945–1961Retired
William R. Reed 1961–1971Died in office
Wayne Duke 1971–1989Retired
Jim Delany 1989–2020Retired
Kevin Warren 2020–2023Resigned to become president of the Chicago Bears; shortest-tenured commissioner in conference history
Tony Petitti 2023–present

All Big Ten members are members of the Big Ten Academic Alliance, formerly known as the Committee on Institutional Cooperation. [55] [56] [57] The University of Chicago, a former Big Ten Conference member, was a member of the CIC from 1958 to June 29, 2016. [58] [59] [60] [61]

Athletic department revenue by school

Total revenue includes ticket sales, contributions and donations, rights and licensing, student fees, school funds and all other sources including TV income, camp income, concessions, and novelties.

Total expenses includes coach and staff salaries, scholarships, buildings and grounds, maintenance, utilities and rental fees, recruiting, team travel, equipment and uniforms, conference dues, and insurance.

The following table shows institutional reporting to the United States Department of Education as shown on the DOE Equity in Athletics website for the 2021–22 academic year. [62]

  Members joining in 2024.

Revenue from athletic programs of Big Ten Conference members
Institution2021–22 Total Revenue from Athletics2021–22 Total Expenses on Athletics
Ohio State University $246,605,307$209,874,565
University of Michigan $210,652,287$176,070,866
Pennsylvania State University $193,624,925$174,110,034
USC $187,650,353$187,650,353
Indiana University Bloomington $165,475,544$113,738,066
University of Iowa $150,428,705$126,680,448
University of Washington $145,184,864$136,494,743
University of Wisconsin-Madison $143,998,339$132,104,285
Michigan State University $143,656,649$128,196,083
University of Nebraska-Lincoln $136,303,218$124,061,227
UCLA $131,106,913$131,106,913
Rutgers University–New Brunswick $130,891,215$130,891,215
University of Minnesota $125,192,956$113,686,733
University of Oregon $121,317,887$121,162,341
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign $115,544,276$113,652,548
Purdue University $115,139,432$97,361,750
University of Maryland, College Park $114,385,462$114,385,462
Northwestern University $105,383,998$105,383,998

The following table shows revenue specifically from NCAA / Conference Distributions, Media Rights, and Post-Season Football reported by the Knight Commission for the 2021–22 academic year. [63]

Knight Commission reporting on Big Ten Conference members
Institution2021–22 Distribution (Millions of dollars)
Ohio State University $71.92
Michigan State University $64.86
University of Iowa $64.60
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign $63.97
Indiana University Bloomington $63.88
University of Minnesota $63.37
University of Michigan $62.97
University of Wisconsin-Madison $62.78
Purdue University $62.25
Pennsylvania State University $56.62
University of Maryland, College Park $52.25
University of Nebraska-Lincoln $56.50
Rutgers University–New Brunswick $49.21
Northwestern University Not Reported

Key personnel

Senior personnel of Big Ten Conference athletic programs
SchoolAthletic directorFootball coachMen's basketball coachWomen's basketball coachBaseball coachSoftball coachVolleyball coach
Illinois Josh Whitman Brett Bielema Brad Underwood Shauna Green Dan Hartleb Tyra Perry Chris Tamas
Indiana Scott Dolson Curt Cignetti Mike Woodson Teri Moren Jeff Mercer Shonda Stanton Steve Aird
Iowa Beth Goetz Kirk Ferentz Fran McCaffery Lisa Bluder Rick Heller Renee Luers-Gillispie Jim Barnes
Maryland Damon Evans Mike Locksley Kevin Willard Brenda Frese Matt Swope Lauren Karn Adam Frese
Michigan Warde Manuel Sherrone Moore Dusty May Kim Barnes Arico Tracy Smith Bonnie Tholl Erin Virtue
Michigan State Alan Haller Jonathan Smith Tom Izzo Robyn Fralick Jake Boss Sharonda McDonald-Kelley Leah Johnson
Minnesota Mark Coyle P.J. Fleck Ben Johnson Dawn Plitzuweit John Anderson Piper Ritter Keegan Cook
Nebraska Troy Dannen Matt Rhule Fred Hoiberg Amy Williams Will Bolt Rhonda Revelle John Cook
Northwestern Derrick Gragg David Braun Chris Collins Joe McKeown Ben Greenspan Kate Drohan Tim Nollan
Ohio State Gene Smith Ryan Day Jake Diebler Kevin McGuff Bill Mosiello Kelly Kovach Schoenly Jen Flynn Oldenburg
Oregon Rob Mullens Dan Lanning Dana Altman Kelly Graves Mark Wasikowski Melyssa Lombardi Matt Ulmer
Penn State Patrick Kraft James Franklin Mike Rhoades Carolyn Kieger Mike Gambino Clarisa Crowell Katie Schumacher-Cawley
Purdue Mike Bobinski Ryan Walters Matt Painter Katie Gearlds Greg Goff Magali Frezzotti Dave Shondell
Rutgers Patrick E. Hobbs Greg Schiano Steve Pikiell Coquese Washington Steve Owens Kristen Butler Caitlin Schweihofer
UCLA Martin Jarmond DeShaun Foster Mick Cronin Cori Close John Savage Kelly Inouye-Perez Alfredo Reft
USC Jennifer Cohen Lincoln Riley Eric Musselman Lindsay Gottlieb Andy Stankiewicz No Team Brad Keller
Washington Patrick Chun Jedd Fisch Danny Sprinkle Tina Langley Jason Kelly Heather Tarr Leslie Gabriel
Wisconsin Chris McIntosh Luke Fickell Greg Gard Marisa Moseley No Team Yvette Healy Kelly Sheffield

Broadcasting and media rights

Fall 2007–Spring 2017

Commissioner Jim Delany began to explore the formation of a Big Ten-specific channel in 2004 after a failed attempt to seek a significantly larger rights fee from ESPN to renew its existing agreements. This came to fruition in 2006, when the conference announced the formation of a dedicated cable network, Big Ten Network, in a 20-year partnership with Fox Sports, which would officially launch in 2007. [64] The network carries coverage of Big Ten athletics (including events not carried by the Big Ten's other media partners), studio shows, as well as other original programs and documentaries profiling the conference and its members. [65] The impact of Big Ten Network influenced the conference's expansion in the 2010's, with some of its newer members being located in proximity to major media markets such as Baltimore and Washington, D.C. (Maryland) and the New York metropolitan area (Rutgers). [66] [67]

Accompanying the new network announcement was a new ten-year media rights agreement beginning with the 2007–08 season and ending with the 2016–17 season that would split Big Ten coverage among the ESPN networks, CBS Sports, and Big Ten Network, thus ending Comcast Chicago's regional coverage of the conference. [68] [69]

In 2010, the Big Ten announced the creation of the Big Ten Football Championship game starting with the 2011 season and signed a broadcast deal with Fox to broadcast the game from 2011 through 2016. [70]

Fall 2017–Spring 2023

In 2016, the conference announced a new six-year media rights deal worth $2.64 billion with Fox Sports, CBS Sports, and ESPN to take effect with the start of the 2017–18 season and ending with the 2022–23 season. The size of the deal translated to a near tripling of the per-school media revenue share. [71]

The new deal would see regular season Big Ten football games airing on Fox and Fox Sports 1 for the first time. As part of the deal, Fox would retain its coverage of the Big Ten Championship as well as obtain priority over ESPN when drafting regular season football games prior to each season. It would also put an end to ESPN's coverage of the Big Ten men's basketball tournament.

Fall 2023–Spring 2030

On August 18, 2022, the Big Ten announced that it had reached seven-year broadcast rights deals with Fox, CBS, and for the first time, NBC Sports, beginning in the 2023–24 academic year, ending an association between the conference and ESPN dating back to the 1980s. A major goal for the new contracts was to establish specific broadcast windows for Big Ten football games across its three partners, with Fox, CBS, and NBC primarily holding rights to Noon ET, 3:30 p.m. ET, and primetime games, respectively, [44] [45] [46] and the three broadcasters alternating first pick of games. [72] The contracts were estimated to be worth at least $7 billion, [44] [73] but also reportedly includes an "escalator clause" that will raise the value of the contracts if the Notre Dame Fighting Irish were to specifically join the Big Ten. [74]

Sports

The Big Ten Conference sponsors championship competition in 14 men's and 14 women's NCAA sanctioned sports. [75]

Teams in Big Ten Conference competition
SportMen'sWomen's
Baseball 13
Basketball 1414
Cross country 1214
Field hockey 9
Football 14
Golf 1414
Gymnastics 510
Ice hockey 7
Lacrosse 67
Rowing 8
Soccer 914
Softball 14
Swimming & diving 1013
Tennis 1214
Track and field (indoor) 1013
Track and field (outdoor) 1313
Volleyball 14
Wrestling 14

Men's sponsored sports by school

SchoolBaseballBasketballCross CountryFootballGolfGymnasticsIce hockeyLacrosseSoccerSwimming DivingTennisTrack & Field (Indoor)Track & Field (Outdoor)WrestlingTotal
IllinoisYesYesYesYesYesYesNoNoNoNoYesYesYesYes10
IndianaYesYesYesYesYesNoNoNoYesYesYesYesYesYes11
IowaYesYesYesYesYesNoNoNoNoNoNoYesYesYes8
MarylandYesYesNoYesYesNoNoYesYesNoNoNoYesYes8
MichiganYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes14
Michigan StateYesYesYesYesYesNoYesNoYesNoYesYesYesYes11
MinnesotaYesYesYesYesYesNoYesNoNoYesNoNoYesYes9
NebraskaYesYesYesYesYesYesNoNoNoNoYesYesYesYes10
NorthwesternYesYesNoYesYesNoNoNoYesYesYesNoNoYes8
Ohio StateYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes14
Penn StateYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes14
PurdueYesYesYesYesYesNoNoNoNoYesYesYesYesYes10
RutgersYesYesYesYesYesNoNoYesYesNoNoYesYesYes10
WisconsinNoYesYesYesYesNoYesNoYesYesYesYesYesYes11
Totals131412141456+1*5+1°9810111314148+2
Affiliate Members
Johns HopkinsYes1
Notre DameYes1
Future members
OregonYesYesYesYesYesNoNoNoNoNoYesYesYesNo8
UCLAYesYesYesYesYesNoNoNoYesNoYesYesYesNo9
USCYesYesNoYesYesNoNoNoNoYesYesYesYesNo8
WashingtonYesYesYesYesYesNoNoNoYesNoYesYesYesNo9

Notes:

    * Notre Dame joined the Big Ten in the 2017–18 school year as an affiliate member in men's ice hockey. [76] It continues to field its other sports in the ACC except in football where it will continue to compete as an independent.

    ° Johns Hopkins joined the Big Ten in 2014 as an affiliate member in men's lacrosse, with women's lacrosse following in 2016. It continues to field its other sports in the NCAA Division III Centennial Conference. [77]

    Men's varsity sports not sponsored by the Big Ten Conference that are played by Big Ten schools
    SchoolFencing [lower-alpha 1] Lightweight Rowing [lower-alpha 2] Pistol [lower-alpha 3] Rifle [lower-alpha 4] Rowing [lower-alpha 2] VolleyballWater Polo
    Ohio StateIndependentNoIndependent PRC No MIVA No
    Penn StateIndependentNoNoNoNo EIVA No
    RutgersNo EARC NoNo EARC NoNo
    WisconsinNoNoNoNo EARC NoNo
    Future Members
    UCLANoNoNoNoNo MPSF MPSF
    USCNoNoNoNoNo MPSF MPSF
    WashingtonNoNoNoNoTBCNoNo
    1. Fencing is officially a coeducational team sport, although a few schools field only a women's team. Ohio State and Penn State, like most NCAA fencing schools, have coed teams.
    2. 1 2 Men's rowing, whether heavyweight or lightweight, is not governed by the NCAA, but instead by the Intercollegiate Rowing Association. Rutgers Men's Rowing was downgraded to Club status in 2008, but remains a member of the EARC.
    3. Unlike rifle, pistol is not an NCAA-governed sport. It is fully coeducational.
    4. Rifle is technically a men's sport, but men's, women's, and coed teams all compete against each other. Ohio State fields a coed team.

    Women's sponsored sports by school

    SchoolBasketballCross CountryField HockeyGolfGymnasticsLacrosseRowingSoccerSoftballSwimming & DivingTennisTrack & Field (Indoor)Track & Field (Outdoor)VolleyballTotal
    IllinoisYesYesNoYesYesNoNoYesYesYesYesYesYesYes11
    IndianaYesYesYesYesNoNoYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes12
    IowaYesYesYesYesYesNoYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes13
    MarylandYesYesYesYesYesYesNoYesYesNoYesYesYesYes12
    MichiganYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes14
    Michigan StateYesYesYesYesYesNoYesYesYesNoYesYesYesYes12
    MinnesotaYesYesNoYesYesNoYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes12
    NebraskaYesYesNoYesYesNoNoYesYesYesYesYesYesYes11
    NorthwesternYesYesYesYesNoYesNoYesYesYesYesNoNoYes10
    Ohio StateYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes14
    Penn StateYesYesYesYesYesYesNoYesYesYesYesYesYesYes13
    PurdueYesYesNoYesNoNoNoYesYesYesYesYesYesYes11
    RutgersYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes14
    WisconsinYesYesNoYesNoNoYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes11
    Totals1414914106+1 [c 1] 814141214131314172+1
    Affiliate Members
    Johns HopkinsYes1
    Future Members
    OregonYesYesNoYesNoYesNoYesYesNoYesYesYesYes10
    UCLAYesYesNoYesYesNoYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes12
    USCYesYesNoYesNoYesYesYesNoYesYesYesYesYes11
    WashingtonYesYesNoYesYesNoYesYesYesNoYesYesYesYes11
    Notes

      Women's varsity sports not sponsored by the Big Ten Conference that are played by Big Ten schools

      SchoolAcrobatics & Tumbling [lower-alpha 1] BowlingFencing [lower-alpha 2] Ice HockeyLightweight Rowing [lower-alpha 3] Pistol [lower-alpha 4] Rifle [lower-alpha 5] Synchronized Swimming [lower-alpha 6] Water PoloBeach VolleyballWrestling [lower-alpha 7]
      IndianaNoNoNoNoNoNoNoNo MPSF NoNo
      IowaNoNoNoNoNoNoNoNoNoNo [lower-alpha 8]
      MichiganNoNoNoNoNoNoNoNo CWPA NoNo
      MinnesotaNoNoNo WCHA NoNoNoNoNoNoNo
      NebraskaNoIndependentNoNoNoNo PRC NoNoIndependentNo
      NorthwesternNoNoCentral Collegiate Fencing ConferenceNoNoNoNoNoNoNoNo
      Ohio StateNoNoCentral Collegiate Fencing Conference WCHA NoIndependent PRC IndependentNoNoNo
      Penn StateNoNoIndependent AHA NoNoNoNoNoNoNo
      RutgersNoNoNoNo EARC NoNoNoNoNoNo
      WisconsinNoNoNo WCHA EARC NoNoNoNoNoNo
      Future members
      OregonIndependentNoNoNoNoNoNoNoNo MPSF No
      UCLANoNoNoNoNoNoNoNo MPSF MPSF No
      USCNoNoNoNoNoNoNoNo MPSF MPSF No
      WashingtonNoNoNoNoNoNoNoNoNo MPSF No
      1. Part of the NCAA Emerging Sports for Women program. NCAA-recognized competition is governed by the National Collegiate Acrobatics & Tumbling Association.
      2. Fencing is officially a coeducational team sport, but all bouts involve members of the same sex. Most NCAA fencing schools field both men's and women's squads, although a few schools field only a women's squad. Ohio State and Penn State have both men's and women's squads, while Northwestern fields only a women's squad.
      3. The only category of rowing that the NCAA governs is women's heavyweight rowing. Women's lightweight rowing, as with all men's rowing, is governed by the Intercollegiate Rowing Association.
      4. Unlike rifle, pistol is not an NCAA-governed sport. It is fully coeducational.
      5. Rifle is technically a men's sport, but men's, women's, and coed teams all compete against each other. Nebraska fields a women-only team, and Ohio State fields a coed team.
      6. Synchronized swimming is not governed by the NCAA. Collegiate competition is governed by United States Synchronized Swimming, the sport's national governing body.
      7. Women's wrestling is part of the NCAA Emerging Sports for Women program. NCAA-recognized competition is governed by the National Wrestling Coaches Association.
      8. Iowa will add women's wrestling in the 2023–24 school year. [78]

      Rivalries

      Intra-conference football rivalries

      The members of the Big Ten have longstanding rivalries with each other, especially on the football field. Each school, except Maryland and Rutgers, has at least one traveling trophy at stake. The following is a list of active rivalries in the Big Ten Conference with totals & records through the completion of the 2022 season.

      TeamsRivalry nameTrophyMeetingsRecordSeries leaderCurrent streak
      Illinois Michigan Illinois–Michigan football series None9772–23–2MichiganMichigan won 3
      Northwestern Illinois–Northwestern football rivalry Land of Lincoln Trophy11657-54-5IllinoisIllinois won 2
      Ohio State Illinois-Ohio State football rivalry Illibuck Trophy10368-30-4Ohio StateOhio State won 8
      Purdue Illinois–Purdue football rivalry Purdue Cannon9847-45-6PurduePurdue won 3
      Indiana Michigan State Indiana–Michigan State football rivalry Old Brass Spittoon6950-17-2Michigan StateIndiana won 1
      Purdue Indiana-Purdue football rivalry Old Oaken Bucket12476-42-6PurduePurdue won 2
      Iowa Minnesota Iowa–Minnesota football rivalry Floyd of Rosedale11662-52-2MinnesotaIowa won 8
      Nebraska Iowa–Nebraska football rivalry Heroes Trophy5330-20-3NebraskaNebraska won 1
      Wisconsin Iowa–Wisconsin football rivalry Heartland Trophy9649-45-2WisconsinIowa won 1
      Maryland Penn State Maryland–Penn State football rivalry None4642-3-1Penn StatePenn State won 2
      Michigan Illinois Illinois–Michigan football series 9772–23–2MichiganMichigan won 6
      Michigan State Michigan–Michigan State football rivalry Paul Bunyan Trophy11572-38-5MichiganMichigan won 2
      Minnesota Michigan-Minnesota football rivalry Little Brown Jug10476-25-3MichiganMichigan won 4
      Northwestern Michigan-Northwestern football rivalry George Jewett Trophy7659–15–2MichiganMichigan won 7
      Ohio State The Game None11860-51-6MichiganMichigan won 3
      Penn State Michigan–Penn State football rivalry 2616-10MichiganMichigan won 3
      Michigan State Indiana Indiana–Michigan State football rivalry Old Brass Spittoon6950-17-2Michigan StateIndiana won 1
      Michigan Michigan–Michigan State football rivalry Paul Bunyan Trophy11572-38-5MichiganMichigan won 2
      Penn State Michigan State–Penn State football rivalry Land Grant Trophy3618-18-1TiedPenn State won 1
      Minnesota Iowa Iowa–Minnesota football rivalry Floyd of Rosedale11662-52-2MinnesotaIowa won 8
      Michigan Michigan-Minnesota football rivalry Little Brown Jug10476-25-3MichiganMichigan won 4
      Nebraska Minnesota–Nebraska football rivalry $5 Bits of Broken Chair Trophy6336-25-2MinnesotaMinnesota won 4
      Penn StateMinnesota–Penn State football rivalryGovernor's Victory Bell1610-6Penn StatePenn State won 1
      Wisconsin Border Battle Paul Bunyan's Axe13262-63-8WisconsinWisconsin won 1
      Nebraska Iowa Iowa–Nebraska football rivalry Heroes Trophy5330-20-3NebraskaNebraska won 1
      Minnesota Minnesota–Nebraska football rivalry $5 Bits of Broken Chair Trophy6336-25-2MinnesotaMinnesota won 4
      Wisconsin Nebraska–Wisconsin football rivalry Freedom Trophy1612-4WisconsinWisconsin won 9
      Northwestern Illinois Illinois–Northwestern football rivalry Land of Lincoln Trophy11657-54-5IllinoisIllinois won 2
      Michigan Michigan-Northwestern football rivalry George Jewett Trophy7659–15–2MichiganMichigan won 7
      Ohio State Illinois Illinois-Ohio State football rivalry Illibuck Trophy10368-30-4Ohio StateOhio State won 8
      Michigan The Game None11860-51-6MichiganMichigan won 2
      Penn State Ohio State–Penn State football rivalry 3823-14Ohio StateOhio State won 6
      Oregon Washington Oregon–Washington football rivalry 11463-48-5WashingtonWashington won 3
      Penn State Maryland Maryland–Penn State football rivalry 4642-3-1Penn StatePenn State won 2
      Michigan Michigan–Penn State football rivalry 2616-10MichiganMichigan won 2
      Michigan State Michigan State–Penn State football rivalry Land Grant Trophy3618-18-1TiedPenn State won 1
      MinnesotaMinnesota–Penn State football rivalryGovernor's Victory Bell1610-6Penn StatePenn State won 1
      Ohio State Ohio State–Penn State football rivalry None3823-14Ohio StateOhio State won 6
      Purdue Illinois Illinois–Purdue football rivalry Purdue Cannon9847-45-6PurduePurdue won 3
      Indiana Indiana-Purdue football rivalry Old Oaken Bucket12476-42-6PurduePurdue won 2
      UCLA USC UCLA-USC football rivalry Victory Bell9250-33-7USCUCLA won 1
      USC UCLA USC-UCLA football rivalry Victory Bell9250-33-7USCUCLA won 1
      Washington Oregon Oregon–Washington football rivalry None11463-48-5WashingtonWashington won 3
      Wisconsin Iowa Iowa–Wisconsin football rivalry Heartland Trophy9649-45-2WisconsinIowa won 1
      Minnesota Border Battle Paul Bunyan's Axe13263-62-8WisconsinWisconsin won 1
      Nebraska Nebraska–Wisconsin football rivalry Freedom Trophy1612-4WisconsinWisconsin won 9

      Extra-conference football rivalries

      TeamsRivalry nameTrophyMeetingsRecordSeries leaderExisting streak
      Illinois Missouri Arch Rivalry 247–17MissouriIllinois lost 6
      Indiana Kentucky Indiana–Kentucky rivalry 3618–17–1IndianaIndiana won 1
      Iowa Iowa State Iowa–Iowa State football rivalry Cy-Hawk Trophy 6946–23IowaIowa lost 1
      Maryland Navy Maryland–Navy rivalry Crab Bowl Trophy 217–14NavyMaryland won 2
      Virginia Maryland–Virginia football rivalry Tydings Trophy 7844–32–2MarylandMaryland won 2
      West Virginia Maryland–West Virginia football rivalry 5323–28–2West VirginiaMaryland won 1
      Michigan Chicago Chicago–Michigan football rivalry 2619–7MichiganMichigan won 3
      Notre Dame Michigan–Notre Dame football rivalry 4425–17–1MichiganMichigan won 1
      Michigan State Notre Dame Michigan State–Notre Dame football rivalry Megaphone Trophy7929–47–1Notre DameMichigan State lost 1
      Nebraska Colorado Colorado–Nebraska football rivalry 7149–20–2NebraskaNebraska lost 2
      Kansas Kansas–Nebraska football rivalry 11791–23–3NebraskaNebraska won 3
      Kansas State Kansas State–Nebraska football rivalry -9578-15-2NebraskaNebraska won 6
      Miami (FL) Miami–Nebraska football rivalry 126–6TiedNebraska lost 1
      Missouri Missouri–Nebraska football rivalry Victory Bell10465–36–3NebraskaNebraska won 2
      Oklahoma Nebraska–Oklahoma football rivalry 8838-47-3OklahomaNebraska lost 3
      Northwestern Notre Dame Northwestern–Notre Dame football rivalry 499-38-2Notre DameNorthwestern lost 1
      Oregon Oregon State Oregon–Oregon State football rivalry Platypus Trophy 12768-49-10OregonOregon won 1
      Penn State Alabama Alabama–Penn State football rivalry 155-10AlabamaPenn State lost 2
      Pittsburgh Penn State–Pittsburgh football rivalry 10053–43–4Penn StatePenn State won 3
      Syracuse Penn State–Syracuse football rivalry 7143–23–5Penn StatePenn State won 5
      West Virginia Penn State–West Virginia football rivalry 5948–9–2Penn StatePenn State won 4
      Purdue Chicago Chicago–Purdue football rivalry 4214–27–1ChicagoPurdue won 9
      Notre Dame Notre Dame–Purdue football rivalry Shillelagh Trophy8726–57–2Notre DamePurdue lost 6
      Rutgers Princeton Princeton–Rutgers rivalry 7117-53-1PrincetonRutgers won 5
      UCLA California California-UCLA football rivalry 9357–34–1UCLAUCLA won 3
      USC Notre Dame Notre Dame–USC football rivalry Jeweled Shillelagh9338–50–5Notre DameUSC won 1
      Stanford Stanford–USC football rivalry 10163–34–3USCUSC won 1
      Washington Washington State Apple Cup Apple Cup Trophy11475-33-6WashingtonWashington won 2

      [79]

      Protected matchups

      Beginning in 2024, the conference will eliminate divisions but will protect certain matchups. The following are the conference's 12 protected matchups. [80]

      From 1993 through 2010, the Big Ten football schedule was set up with each team having two permanent matches within the conference, with the other eight teams in the conference rotating out of the schedule in pairs for two-year stints. Permanent matches were as follows:[ citation needed ]

      This system was discontinued after the 2010 season, as teams became grouped into two divisions, and would play all teams in their division once, with one protected cross-over game, and two games rotating against the other five opponents from the opposing division.

      Most of the above permanent rivalries were maintained. By virtue of the new alignment, a handful of new permanent divisional opponents were created, as all pairs of teams within the same division would face off each season. Furthermore, three new permanent inter-divisional matches resulted from the realignment: Purdue–Iowa, Michigan State–Indiana, and Penn State–Nebraska. The following past permanent matches were maintained across divisions: Minnesota–Wisconsin, Michigan–Ohio State, and Illinois–Northwestern.

      The new alignment, however, caused some of the above permanent rivalries to be discontinued. These were: Iowa–Wisconsin, Northwestern–Purdue, and Michigan State–Penn State. These matchups would continue to be played, but only twice every five years on average. More rivalries were disrupted, and some resumed on a yearly basis, when the league realigned into East and West Divisions for the 2014 season with the addition of Maryland and Rutgers. The two new schools were placed in the new East Division with Penn State, and the two Indiana schools were divided (Indiana to the East and Purdue to the West). With the move to a nine-game conference schedule in 2016, all cross-division games will be held at least once in a four-year cycle except for Indiana–Purdue, which is the only protected cross-division game. [34] The conference later announced that once the new scheduling format takes effect in 2016, members will be prohibited from playing FCS teams, and required to play at least one non-conference game against a team in the Power Five conferences (ACC, Big 12, Pac-12 and SEC; presumably, this would also allow for non-conference games against Big Ten opponents that are not on the conference schedule). Games against independents Notre Dame (an ACC member in non-football sports) also count toward the Power Five requirement, as did games against BYU before it joined the Big 12 in 2023. [81]

      Intra-conference basketball rivalries

      Extra-conference basketball rivalries

      * Indicates team not yet member of conference.

      Other sports

      Men's ice hockey

      Men's lacrosse

      Men's soccer

      Wrestling

      • Penn State–Lehigh
      • Iowa-Penn State
      • Iowa–Iowa State
      • Iowa–Oklahoma State
      • Rutgers–Princeton

      Extra-conference rivalries

      Four Big Ten teams—Purdue, Northwestern, Michigan State and Michigan—had rivalries in football with Notre Dame. After the University of Southern California with 35 wins (including a vacated 2005 win), the Michigan State Spartans have the most wins against the Irish, with 28. The Purdue Boilermakers follow with 26, and Michigan ranks fourth all-time with 24. Northwestern and Notre Dame had a yearly contest, with the winner taking home a shillelagh, much like the winner of the USC–Notre Dame and Purdue–Notre Dame contests now receive. The Northwestern–Notre Dame shillelagh was largely forgotten by the early 1960s and is now solely an element of college football's storied past. [82]

      Penn State has a longstanding rivalry with Pittsburgh of the ACC, but the two schools did not meet from 2000 until renewing the rivalry with an alternating home-and-home series from 2016 to 2019. Penn State also has long histories with independent Notre Dame; Temple of The American; Syracuse, and Boston College of the ACC; and West Virginia, of the Big 12 Conference. Additionally, Penn State maintains strong intrastate rivalries with Patriot League universities Bucknell in men's basketball and men's lacrosse, and Lehigh in wrestling. Most of these rivalries were cultivated while Penn State operated independent of conference affiliation; the constraints of playing a full conference schedule, especially in football, have reduced the number of meetings between Penn State and its non-Big Ten rivals.

      Iowa has an in-state rivalry with Iowa State of the Big 12, with the winner getting the Cy-Hawk Trophy in football. Iowa and Iowa State also compete annually in the Cy-Hawk Series sponsored by Hy-Vee (as of 2011 this series is now sponsored by The Iowa Corngrowers Association), the competition includes all head-to-head regular season competitions in all sports. Iowa also holds rivalries in basketball with the state's other two Division I programs, Drake and Northern Iowa.

      Indiana has an out-of-conference rivalry with Kentucky of the SEC (see Indiana–Kentucky rivalry). While the two schools played in football for many years, the rivalry was rooted in their decades of national success in men's basketball. The two no longer play one another in football, but their basketball rivalry continued until a dispute about game sites ended the series after 2011. In the last season of the rivalry (2011–12), the teams played twice. During the regular season, then-unranked Indiana defeated then-#1 ranked Kentucky 73–72 at Assembly Hall. The Wildcats avenged the loss in the NCAA tournament, defeating Indiana 102–90 in the South Regional final in Atlanta on their way to a national title. The teams next played in the 2016 NCAA tournament, with Indiana winning.

      Illinois has a longstanding basketball rivalry with the SEC's Missouri Tigers, with the two men's teams squaring off annually in the "Braggin' Rights" game. It has been held in St. Louis since 1980, first at the St. Louis Arena and since 1994 at the Enterprise Center. This rivalry has been carried over into football as "The Arch Rivalry" with games played at the Edward Jones Dome in St. Louis in 2002 and 2003 and four games in 2007 through 2010.

      Wisconsin has a long-standing in-state basketball rivalry with Marquette. The series has intensified as of late with both teams having made the Final Four in recent years. The schools also played an annual football game before Marquette abandoned its football program in 1961. The school also has minor rivalries in basketball with the two other Division I members of the University of Wisconsin System, which include the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee and University of Wisconsin–Green Bay.

      Similarly, Nebraska has an in-state rivalry with another Big East school in Creighton, mostly in basketball and baseball.

      Minnesota men's ice hockey has a prolific and fierce border rivalry with the University of North Dakota. The two teams played annually between 1948 and 2013 as members of the Western Collegiate Hockey Association prior to the inception of the Big Ten Conference. The rivalry resumed in 2016 in non-conference action.

      Maryland has many rivalries outside of the conference, most notably Duke, Virginia, West Virginia, and Navy. Maryland left the Duke and Virginia rivalries behind in the ACC when it joined the Big Ten.

      In the early days of the Big Ten, the Chicago-Michigan game was played on Thanksgiving, usually with conference championship implications. It was considered one of the first major rivalries of the conference.

      Facilities

      Three Big Ten football stadiums seat over 100,000 spectators: Michigan Stadium (Michigan), Beaver Stadium (Penn State), and Ohio Stadium (Ohio State). Only five other college football stadiums have a capacity over 100,000 (as of the 2024 season, all in the Southeastern Conference (SEC)). [83] Michigan Stadium and Beaver Stadium, respectively, are the two largest American football stadiums by capacity in the United States, [83] [84] and all three of the Big Ten's largest venues rank among the ten largest sports stadiums in the world. UCLA plays in the Rose Bowl as its home stadium, which is the location of the Rose Bowl Game for the Big Ten champion.

      Big Ten schools also play in two of the 10 largest on-campus basketball arenas in the country: Ohio State's Value City Arena and Maryland's Xfinity Center. Additionally, arenas at Indiana, Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, and Penn State rank among the 20 largest on-campus basketball facilities in the United States. As of the upcoming 2024–25 season, the Big Ten Conference has the most on-campus basketball arenas with seating capacities of 15,000 or more of any NCAA conference, with seven. (Of the other conferences considered "power conferences" in men's basketball, the ACC has two such arenas, the Big East none, the Big 12 four, and the SEC five. Outside of these conferences, the Mountain West Conference has four such arenas.)

      Football, basketball, baseball, and soccer facilities

        Members joining in 2024.

      SchoolFootball stadiumCapacityOpenedBasketball arenaCapacityOpenedBaseball stadiumCapacityOpenedSoccer stadiumCapacityOpened
      Illinois Memorial Stadium 60,6701923 State Farm Center 15,5441963 Illinois Field 3,0001988 Demirjian Park 7002021
      Indiana Memorial Stadium 52,6261960 Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall 17,2221971 Bart Kaufman Field 2,5002013 Bill Armstrong Stadium 6,5001981
      Iowa Kinnick Stadium 70,5851929 Carver–Hawkeye Arena 15,0561983 Duane Banks Field 3,0001974 Iowa Soccer Complex
      Maryland SECU Stadium 51,8021950 Xfinity Center 17,9502002 Bob "Turtle" Smith Stadium 2,5001965 Ludwig Field 7,0001995
      Michigan Michigan Stadium 107,6011927 Crisler Center 12,7071967 Ray Fisher Stadium 4,0001923 U-M Soccer Stadium 2,2002010
      Michigan State Spartan Stadium 75,0051923 Breslin Student Events Center 14,7971989 McLane Stadium at Kona Field
      Jackson Field

      4,000
      13,527

      1902
      1996
      DeMartin Soccer Complex 2,5002008
      Minnesota Huntington Bank Stadium 52,5252009 Williams Arena 14,6251928 U.S. Bank Stadium
      Siebert Field
      N/A
      1,420
      2016
      2013
      Elizabeth Lyle Robbie Stadium 1,0001999
      Nebraska Memorial Stadium 87,0001923 Pinnacle Bank Arena 15,5002013 Haymarket Park 8,5002001 Barbara Hibner Soccer Stadium 2,5002015
      Northwestern TBA [lower-alpha 1] TBA1926 Welsh–Ryan Arena 7,0391952 Rocky Miller Park 6001944 Lanny and Sharon Martin Stadium 3,0002016
      Ohio State Ohio Stadium 104,9441922 Value City Arena 19,5001998 Bill Davis Stadium 4,4501997 Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium 10,0002001
      Oregon Autzen Stadium 54,0001967 Matthew Knight Arena 12,3642011 PK Park 4,0002009 Papé Field 1,0002012
      Penn State Beaver Stadium 106,5721960 Bryce Jordan Center 15,2611996 Medlar Field 5,5702006 Jeffrey Field 5,0001966
      Purdue Ross–Ade Stadium 65,0001924 Mackey Arena 14,8761967 Alexander Field 1,5002013 Folk Field
      Rutgers SHI Stadium 52,4541994 Jersey Mike's Arena 8,0001977 Bainton Field 1,2502007 Yurcak Field 5,0001994
      UCLA Rose Bowl 92,5421922 Pauley Pavilion 13,8001965 Jackie Robinson Stadium 1,8201981 Wallis Annenberg Stadium 2,1452018
      USC Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum 77,5001923 Galen Center 10,2582006 Dedeaux Field 2,5001974 Soni McAlister Field 1,0001998
      Washington Husky Stadium 70,0831920 Hec Edmundson Pavilion 10,0001927 Husky Ballpark 2,2001998 Husky Soccer Stadium 2,2001997
      Wisconsin Camp Randall Stadium 80,3211917 Kohl Center 17,2871998Non-baseball school McClimon Soccer Complex 1,6111959
      1. Northwestern's football home of Ryan Field is being demolished, with a new stadium of the same name set to open on the site in 2026. Northwestern has yet to announce where it will play home games during construction.

      Ice hockey arenas

      SchoolMen's arenaCapacityWomen's arenaCapacity
      Michigan Yost Ice Arena 5,800No varsity team
      Michigan State Munn Ice Arena 6,470No varsity team
      Minnesota 3M Arena at Mariucci 10,000 Ridder Arena 3,400
      Notre Dame Compton Family Ice Arena 5,022No varsity team
      Ohio State Value City Arena 17,500 OSU Ice Rink 1,415
      Penn State Pegula Ice Arena 6,014 Pegula Ice Arena 6,014
      Wisconsin Kohl Center 15,359 LaBahn Arena 2,273

      Apparel

        Members joining in 2024.

      SchoolProvider
      Illinois Nike
      Indiana Adidas
      Iowa Nike
      Maryland Under Armour
      Michigan Air Jordan (Nike)
      Michigan State Nike
      Minnesota Nike
      Nebraska Adidas
      Northwestern Under Armour
      Ohio State Nike
      Oregon Nike
      Penn State Nike
      Purdue Nike
      Rutgers Adidas
      UCLA Air Jordan (Nike)
      USC Nike
      Washington Adidas
      Wisconsin Under Armour

      Football

      When Maryland and Rutgers joined the Big Ten in 2014, the division names were changed to "East" and "West", with Purdue and the six schools in the Central Time Zone in the West and Indiana joining the remaining six Eastern Time Zone schools in the East. The only protected cross-division game is Indiana–Purdue. Beginning in 2016, the Big Ten adopted a nine-game conference schedule. [35] [85] All teams have one cross-division opponent they play annually that changes every six years except for Indiana and Purdue, whose crossover is permanent. The other six opponents are played every three years during that cycle. For 2016–2021, the pairings are Maryland-Minnesota, Michigan-Wisconsin, Michigan State-Northwestern, Ohio State-Nebraska, Penn State-Iowa, and Rutgers-Illinois, and for 2022–2023 the pairings are Maryland-Northwestern, Michigan-Nebraska, Michigan State-Minnesota, Ohio State-Wisconsin, Penn State-Illinois, and Rutgers-Iowa. [86] In 2016, the Big Ten no longer allowed its members to play Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) teams and also requires at least one non-conference game against a school in the Power Five conferences (ACC, Big 12, Pac-12, SEC). Contracts for future games already scheduled against FCS teams would be honored. However, in 2017, the Big Ten started to allow teams to schedule an FCS opponent during years in which they only have four conference home games (odd-numbered years for East division teams, even-numbered years for West division teams). [87] At the time this policy was first announced, games against FBS independents Notre Dame and BYU would count toward the Power Five requirement. [81] ESPN, citing a Big Ten executive, reported in 2015 that the Big Ten would allow exceptions to the Power Five rule on a case-by-case basis, and also that the other FBS independent at that time, Army, had been added to the list of non-Power Five schools that would be counted as Power Five opponents. [88]

      When the Big Ten expands to 18 teams in 2024 with the arrival of Oregon, UCLA, USC, and Washington, the football divisions will be eliminated. A schedule of nine conference games and three non-conference games will be maintained. At the end of the season, the top two teams in the conference standings will play each other in the Big Ten Football Championship Game. For at least 2024 and 2025, the conference was to adopt what it called the "Flex Protect Plus" model, which called for each conference member to play all the others at home and away at least once during a four-year cycle. Initially, the 11 "protected" matchups were to be played each season. The announcement was made before Oregon and Washington were announced as incoming members. [89] [90] After the expansion to 18 teams was announced, the scheduling model was tweaked into the "Flex Protect XVIII" model, which will maintain the original 11 protected rivalries while adding Oregon–Washington. This model is planned to operate from 2024–2028. [91]

      All-time school records

      This list goes through January 9, 2024.

        Members joining in 2024.

      Future conference members in gray.

      #TeamWonLossTiedPct.Division
      Championships
      Big Ten
      Championships
      Claimed National
      Championships
      1 Michigan 1,00435336.73444512
      2 Ohio State 96433353.7341039†8
      3 USC††87536854.6950011
      4 Penn State 93040941.689242
      5 Nebraska††91742440.678105
      6 Washington††77546550.620002
      7 Michigan State 73048744.596396
      8 Wisconsin 74251853.5855141
      9 UCLA††63744637.585001
      10 Oregon††70551146.577000
      11 Minnesota 73354344.5721187
      12 Iowa 69357639.5452115
      13 Maryland††67762443.520001
      14 Purdue 64159748.517180
      15 Illinois 63262550.5030155
      16 Rutgers††67169542.491001
      17 Northwestern 56670244.448280
      18 Indiana 50771344.419020

      † Ohio State vacated 12 wins and its Big Ten title in 2010 due to NCAA sanctions.

      †† Numbers of division and conference championships shown reflect Big Ten history only and do not include division and conference championships in former conferences. Washington, Oregon, USC and UCLA join the Big Ten in 2024, Maryland and Rutgers joined in 2014, and Nebraska joined in 2011.

      Number of Claimed National Championships, as well as win–loss–tie records, include all seasons played, regardless of conference membership.

      Big Ten Conference champions

      Bowl games

      Since 1946, the Big Ten champion has had a tie-in with the Rose Bowl game. Michigan appeared in the first bowl game, the 1902 Rose Bowl. After that, the Big Ten only allowed one other team to participate in the Rose Bowl (the 1920 Ohio State Buckeyes football team), until the agreement struck with the Pacific Coast Conference for the 1947 Rose Bowl. The spread of civilian air travel plus the fact that the US military had publicly encouraged college football during World War II were primary causes of the Big Ten finally allowing the Rose Bowl. [92] From 1946 through 1971, the Big Ten did not allow the same team to represent the conference in consecutive years in the Rose Bowl with an exception made after the 1961 season in which Minnesota played in the 1962 Rose Bowl after playing in the 1961 Rose Bowl due to Ohio State declining the bid because of Ohio State faculty concerns about academics.

      It was not until the 1975 season that the Big Ten allowed teams to play in bowl games other than the Rose Bowl. Michigan, which had been shut out of the postseason the previous three years, was the first beneficiary of the new rule when it played in the Orange Bowl vs. Oklahoma. Due to the pre-1975 rules, Big Ten teams such as Michigan and Ohio State have lower numbers of all-time bowl appearances than powerhouse teams from the Big 12 Conference (previously Big Eight and Southwest Conferences) and Southeastern Conference, which always placed multiple teams in bowl games every year.

      Since the 2020–21 season, a new slate of bowl game selections has included several new bowl games. [93]

      PickNameLocationOpposing
      Conference
      1 Rose Bowl* Pasadena, California Pac-12
      2 Citrus Bowl or Orange Bowl^ Orlando, Florida or Miami Gardens, Florida SEC or ACC
      3 ReliaQuest Bowl [94] Tampa, Florida SEC
      4 Las Vegas Bowl Paradise, Nevada Pac-12
      5 Music City Bowl [94] Nashville, Tennessee SEC
      6 Pinstripe Bowl [94] New York City ACC
      7 Guaranteed Rate Bowl [94] Phoenix, Arizona Big 12
      8 Quick Lane Bowl [94] Detroit, Michigan MAC

      * If the conference champion is picked for the College Football Playoff in years the Rose Bowl does not host a semifinal, the next highest-ranked team in the committee rankings, or runner-up, shall take its place at the Rose Bowl.

      ^ The Big Ten, along with the SEC, will be eligible to face the ACC representative in the Orange Bowl at least three out of the eight seasons that it does not host a semifinal for the Playoff over a 12-year span. Notre Dame will be chosen the other two years if eligible.

      † The Big Ten will switch between the Las Vegas Bowl and Duke's Mayo Bowl on odd-numbered and even-numbered years, respectively.

      Bowl selection procedures

      Although the pick order usually corresponds to the conference standings, the bowls are not required to make their choices strictly according to the win–loss records; many factors influence bowl selections, especially the likely turnout of the team's fans. Picks are made after CFP selections; the bowl with the #2 pick will have the first pick of the remaining teams in the conference.

      For all non-College Football Playoff partners, the bowl partner will request a Big Ten team. The Big Ten will approve or assign another team based on internal selection parameters.

      When not hosting a semifinal, the Orange Bowl will select the highest-ranked team from the Big Ten, SEC or Notre Dame to face an ACC opponent. (However, in an 8-game cycle [12 years due to not counting when the Orange Bowl is a semifinal], the Big Ten must be selected at least three times and no more than four times; the SEC similarly will be selected between three and four times while Notre Dame may be selected up to two times.) [95] The Big Ten Champion cannot play in the Orange Bowl. If a Big Ten team is not selected by the Orange Bowl, the Citrus Bowl will submit a request for a Big Ten team.

      Head Coach Compensation

      Guaranteed compensation is due to the coaches regardless of performance. Though most of the pay is directed from the university, some also comes in the form of guaranteed endorsements and other income streams. Most coaches also have performance-based bonuses that can significantly raise their salaries. [96]

      In 2024, three Big Ten member schools—Northwestern and USC, private institutions, and Penn State, exempt from most open records laws due to its status as what Pennsylvania calls a "state-related" institution—are not obligated to provide salary information for their head coaches. Both Penn State and Northwestern typically choose to provide this information, although Northwestern has not announced the salary of its current coach.

      InstitutionHead coach2024 guaranteed pay
      Ohio State Ryan Day $9,960,000
      Oregon Dan Lanning $8,000,000
      Nebraska Matt Rhule $7,800,000
      Washington Jedd Fisch $7,750,000
      Wisconsin Luke Fickell $7,500,000
      Penn State James Franklin $7,500,000
      Iowa Kirk Ferentz $7,000,000
      Michigan Sherrone Moore $6,000,000
      Michigan State Jonathan Smith $6,000,000
      Illinois Bret Bielema $6,000,000
      Minnesota P. J. Fleck $5,100,000
      Purdue Ryan Walters $4,100,000
      Indiana Curt Cignetti $4,000,000
      Rutgers Greg Schiano $4,000,000
      Maryland Mike Locksley $4,000,000
      Northwestern David Braun NA
      USC Lincoln RIley NA
      UCLA DeShaun Foster TBA

      Marching bands

      All Big Ten member schools have marching bands which perform regularly during the football season. Ten of the member schools, as well as future member UCLA, have won the Sudler Trophy, [97] generally considered the most prestigious honor a collegiate marching band can receive. [98] The first three Sudler trophies were awarded to Big Ten marching bands—Michigan (1982), Illinois (1983) and Ohio State (1984). [97] The Big Ten has more Sudler Trophy recipients than any other collegiate athletic conference. [97]

      Conference individual honors

      Coaches and media of the Big Ten Conference award individual honors at the end of each football season.

      Men's basketball

      The Big Ten has participated in basketball since 1904, and has led the nation in attendance every season since 1978. [99] Although, they have slightly higher average capacity basketball venues, the attendance edge is largely because Big Ten Conference fans fill a higher percentage of seats than other conferences. [100] It has been a national powerhouse in men's basketball, having multiple championship winners and often sending four or more teams to the NCAA men's basketball tournament. Previous NCAA champions include Indiana with five titles, Michigan State with two, and Wisconsin, Michigan, and Ohio State with one each. Maryland, which joined the Big Ten in 2014, won one NCAA championship as a member of the ACC. [101] [102] Ohio State played in the first NCAA tournament national championship game in 1939, losing to Oregon. Despite this, Jimmy Hull of Ohio State was the first NCAA tournament MVP. The first three tournament MVPs came from the Big Ten (Marv Huffman of Indiana in 1940 and John Katz of Wisconsin in 1941).

      Big Ten teams have also experienced success in the postseason NIT. Since 1974, 13 Big Ten teams have played in the championship game, winning nine championships. Michigan, Ohio State, Penn State, and Minnesota have won two NIT championships, while Indiana and Purdue have won one each. Two other members, Maryland and Nebraska, won NIT titles before they joined the Big Ten. In addition, in 1943 the defunct Helms Athletic Foundation retrospectively awarded national titles to Northwestern for 1931 and Purdue for 1932; then in 1957, it selected Illinois for 1915, Minnesota for 1902 and 1919, and Wisconsin for 1912, 1914 and 1916. [103] Former member Chicago won a post-season national championship series in 1908.

      Conference Challenges

      From 1999 to 2022, the Big Ten took part in the ACC–Big Ten Challenge with the Atlantic Coast Conference. The ACC held a 13–8–3 record against the Big Ten; Minnesota, Nebraska, Penn State, Purdue, and Wisconsin are the only Big Ten schools without losing records in the challenge.

      From 2015 to 2023, the Big Ten took part in the Gavitt Tipoff Games with the Big East Conference. The Big Ten did well in the challenge, holding a 3-1-4 record against the Big East, only losing the challenge in 2021.

      All-time school records

      This list is updated through March 1, 2022 and is listed by win percentage in NCAA Division I men's college basketball.

        Members joining in 2024.

      #Big TenOverall
      record
      Pct.Big Ten
      Tournament
      Championships
      Big Ten
      Regular Season
      Championships
      NCAA National
      Championships
      Claimed
      Pre-Tournament
      Championships
      1 UCLA 1968–888.68900110
      2 Purdue 1855–1045.64022601
      3 Illinois 1833–1031.64031701
      4 Indiana 1865–1080.63502250
      5 Ohio State 1810–1138.6144†20†10
      6 Michigan State 1754–1114.61261620
      7 Michigan 1659–1060.6102†1510
      8 Maryland 1604–1056.6030110
      9 Washington 1812–1203.6010000
      10 Iowa 1695–1193–1.5872800
      11 USC 1701–1241.5780000
      12 Minnesota 1677–1248–2.57308†03†
      13 Wisconsin 1653–1237.57232013
      14 Penn State 1508–1211–1.5550000
      15 Oregon 1753–1408.5540010
      16 Nebraska 1529–1410.5200000
      17 Rutgers 1276–1235.5080000
      18 Northwestern 1105–1557–1.4150201

      † Minnesota vacated its 1997 Big Ten Conference regular season title, Michigan vacated its 1998 Big Ten tournament title, and Ohio State vacated its 2002 Big Ten tournament, as well as 2000 and 2002 regular season titles, due to NCAA sanctions. Minnesota was the champion for both the Premo-Porretta Power Poll and the Helms Athletic Foundation in 1902, but was only the Premo-Porretta champion in 1903 and only the Helms champion in 1919.

      National championships, Final Fours, and NCAA tournament appearances

      Big Ten Conference basketball programs have combined to win 10 NCAA men's basketball championships as Big Ten members, with another current member having won a national championship before joining the conference. Indiana has won five, Michigan State has won two, while Michigan, Ohio State and Wisconsin have won one national championship each as Big Ten members. Maryland won one national championship while a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference. Two future members have won at least one national championship—UCLA has won 11 championships, matching the total of all pre-2024 Big Ten members, and Oregon won the first NCAA tournament in 1939. Eleven teams have advanced to the Final Four at least once in their history, as have all four future members. Nine Big Ten schools (Indiana, Michigan State, Illinois, Purdue, Ohio State, Maryland, Iowa, Michigan, and Wisconsin) plus future member UCLA are among the national top 50 in all-time NCAA tournament appearances.

        Members joining in 2024.

      SchoolMen's NCAA ChampionshipsMen's NCAA
      Final Fours
      Men's NCAA
      Elite Eights
      Men's NCAA
      Sweet Sixteens
      Men's NCAA tournament appearances
      Illinois5
      (1949, 1951, 1952, 1989, 2005)
      9
      (1942, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1963, 1984, 1989, 2001, 2005)
      12
      (1951, 1952, 1963, 1981, 1984, 1985, 1989, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2024)
      34
      (1942, 1949, 1951–52, 1963, 1981, 1983–90, 1993–95, 1997, 1998, 2000–07, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2021, 2022, 2023, 2024)
      Indiana5
      (1940, 1953, 1976, 1981, 1987)
      8
      (1940, 1953, 1973, 1976, 1981, 1987, 1992, 2002)
      11
      (1940, 1953, 1973, 1975, 1976, 1981, 1984, 1987, 1992, 1993, 2002)
      22
      (1953, 1954, 1958, 1967, 1973, 1975, 1976, 1978, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1987, 1989, 1991–94, 2002, 2012, 2013, 2016)
      41
      (1940, 1953, 1954, 1958, 1967, 1973, 1975, 1976, 1978, 1980–84, 1986–2003, 2006–08, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2016, 2022, 2023)
      Iowa3
      (1955, 1956, 1980)
      4
      (1955, 1956, 1980, 1987)
      8
      (1955, 1956, 1970, 1980, 1983, 1987, 1988, 1999)
      29
      (1955, 1956, 1970, 1979–83, 1985–89, 1991–93, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2005, 2006, 2014–16, 2019, 2021, 2022, 2023)
      Maryland1
      (2002)
      2
      (2001, 2002)
      4
      (1973, 1975, 2001, 2002)
      14
      (1958, 1973, 1975, 1980, 1984, 1985, 1994, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2001–03, 2016)
      29
      (1958, 1973, 1975, 1980, 1981, 1983–86, 1994–2004, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2015–17, 2019, 2021, 2023)
      Michigan1
      (1989)
      6
      (1964, 1965, 1976, 1989, 2013, 2018)
      14
      (1948, 1964–66, 1974, 1976, 1977, 1989, 1992, 1994, 2013, 2014, 2018, 2021)
      17
      (1964–66, 1974, 1976–77, 1988, 1989, 1992, 1994, 2013, 2014, 2017–19, 2021, 2022)
      28
      (1948, 1964–66, 1974–77, 1985–90, 1992, 1994, 1995, 2009, 2011–14, 2016–19, 2021, 2022)
      Michigan State2
      (1979, 2000)
      10
      (1957, 1979, 1999–01, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2015, 2019)
      14
      (1957, 1959, 1978, 1979, 1999–01, 2003, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2014, 2015, 2019)
      21
      (1957, 1959, 1978, 1979, 1986, 1990, 1998–2001, 2003, 2005, 2008–10, 2012–15, 2019, 2023)
      36
      (1957, 1959, 1978, 1979, 1985, 1986, 1990–92, 1994, 1995, 1998–2019, 2021, 2022, 2023)
      Minnesota1
      (1990)
      3
      (1982, 1989, 1990)
      10
      (1982, 1989, 1990, 1999, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2013, 2017, 2019)
      Nebraska7
      (1986, 1991–94, 1998, 2014)
      Northwestern2
      (2017, 2023)
      Ohio State1
      (1960)
      10
      (1939, 1944–46, 1960–62, 1968, 2007, 2012)
      14
      (1939, 1944–46, 1950, 1960–62, 1968, 1971, 1992, 2007, 2012, 2013)
      14
      (1960–62, 1968, 1971, 1980, 1983, 1991, 1992, 2007, 2010–13)
      31
      (1939, 1944–46, 1950, 1960–62, 1968, 1971, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1987, 1990–92, 2006, 2007, 2009–15, 2018, 2019, 2021, 2022)
      Oregon1
      (1939)
      2
      (1939, 2017)
      7
      (1939, 1945, 1960, 2002, 2007, 2016, 2017)
      8
      (1960, 2002, 2007, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2019, 2021)
      17
      (1939, 1945, 1960, 1961, 1995, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2019, 2021)
      Penn State1
      (1954)
      2
      (1942, 1954)
      4
      (1952, 1954, 1955, 2001)
      10
      (1942, 1952, 1954, 1955, 1965, 1991, 1996, 2001, 2011, 2023)
      Purdue3
      (1969, 1980, 2024)
      6
      (1969, 1980, 1994, 2000, 2019, 2024)
      14
      (1969, 1980, 1988, 1994, 1998–2000, 2009, 2010, 2017–19, 2022, 2024)
      34
      (1969, 1977, 1980, 1983–88, 1990, 1991, 1993–95, 1997–2000, 2003, 2007–12, 2015–19, 2021–24)
      Rutgers1
      (1976)
      1
      (1976)
      2
      (1976, 1979)
      8
      (1975, 1976, 1979, 1983, 1989, 1991, 2021, 2022)
      UCLA11
      (1964–1965, 1967–1973, 1975, 1995)
      19
      (1962, 1964–1965, 1967–1976, 1976, 1980*, 1995, 2006–2008, 2021)
      23
      (1950, 1962, 1964–1965, 1967–1976, 1979–1980*, 1992, 1995, 1997, 2006–2008, 2021)
      36
      (1952, 1956, 1962–1965, 1967–1980*, 1990, 1992, 1995, 1997–1998, 2000–2002, 2006–2008, 2014–2015, 2017, 2021–2022)
      46
      (1950, 1952, 1956, 1962–1965, 1967–1981, 1983, 1987, 1989–2002, 2005–2009, 2011, 2013–2015 , 2017–2018, 2021–2022, 2023)
      USC2
      (1940, 1954)
      4
      (1940, 1954, 2001, 2021)
      5
      (1954, 1961, 2001, 2007*, 2021)
      21
      (1940, 1954, 1960–1961, 1979, 1982, 1985, 1991–1992, 1997, 2001–2002, 2007*–2009, 2011, 2016–2017, 2021–2022, 2023)
      Washington1
      (1953)
      4
      (1943, 1948, 1951, 1953)
      6
      (1951, 1953, 1984, 1998, 2005, 2006, 2010)
      17
      (1943, 1948, 1951, 1953, 1976, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1998, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2019)
      Wisconsin1
      (1941)
      4
      (1941, 2000, 2014, 2015)
      6
      (1941, 1947, 2000, 2005, 2014, 2015)
      10
      (2000, 2003, 2005, 2008, 2011, 2012, 2014–17)
      26
      (1941, 1947, 1994, 1997, 1999–2017, 2019, 2021, 2022)

      Seasons are listed by the calendar years in which they ended. Italics indicate honors earned before the school competed in the Big Ten.

      Big Ten NCAA tournament champions, runners-up and locations

      † denotes overtime games. Multiple †'s indicate more than one overtime.

      YearChampionRunner-upVenue and city
      1939 Oregon 46 Ohio State 33 Patten Gymnasium Evanston, Illinois
      1940 Indiana 60 Kansas 42 Municipal Auditorium Kansas City, Missouri
      1941 Wisconsin 39 Washington State 34Municipal AuditoriumKansas City, Missouri (2)
      1953 Indiana (2)69 Kansas 68Municipal AuditoriumKansas City, Missouri (4)
      1956 San Francisco (2)83 Iowa 71 McGaw Hall Evanston, Illinois (2)
      1960 Ohio State 75 California 55 Cow Palace Daly City, California
      1961 Cincinnati 70 Ohio State 65Municipal AuditoriumKansas City, Missouri (8)
      1962 Cincinnati (2)71 Ohio State 59 Freedom Hall Louisville, Kentucky (3)
      1965 UCLA (2)91 Michigan 80 Memorial Coliseum Portland, Oregon
      1969 UCLA (5)92 Purdue 72Freedom HallLouisville, Kentucky (6)
      1976 Indiana (3)86 Michigan 68 The Spectrum Philadelphia
      1979 Michigan State 75 Indiana State 64 Special Events Center Salt Lake City
      1981 Indiana (4)63 North Carolina 50SpectrumPhiladelphia (2)
      1987 Indiana (5)74 Syracuse 73 Louisiana Superdome New Orleans (2)
      1989 Michigan 80 Seton Hall 79 Kingdome Seattle (4)
      1992 Duke (2)71 Michigan [a 1] 51 Metrodome Minneapolis
      1993 North Carolina (3)77 Michigan [a 1] 71Louisiana SuperdomeNew Orleans (3)
      2000 Michigan State (2)89 Florida 76 RCA Dome Indianapolis (4)
      2002 Maryland 64 Indiana 52 Georgia Dome Atlanta (2)
      2005 North Carolina (4)75 Illinois 70 Edward Jones Dome St. Louis (3)
      2007 Florida (2)84 Ohio State 75Georgia DomeAtlanta (3)
      2009 North Carolina (5)89 Michigan State 72 Ford Field Detroit
      2013 Louisville [a 2] 82 Michigan 76Georgia DomeAtlanta (4)
      2015 Duke (5)68 Wisconsin 63Lucas Oil StadiumIndianapolis (7)
      2018 Villanova (3)79 Michigan 62 Alamodome San Antonio (4)
      2024 UConn (5)75 Purdue 60 State Farm Stadium Glendale (2)
      1. 1 2 Participation vacated due to major NCAA violations.
      2. Participation and title vacated due to major NCAA violations.

      Big Ten Post-season NIT championships and runners-up

      YearChampionRunner-upMVPVenue and city
      1972 Maryland 100 Niagara 69 Tom McMillen, Maryland Madison Square Garden New York City
      1974 Purdue 87 Utah 81 Mike Sojourner, UtahMadison Square GardenNew York City
      1979 Indiana 53 Purdue 52 Butch Carter and Ray Tolbert, IndianaMadison Square GardenNew York City
      1980 Virginia 58 Minnesota 55 Ralph Sampson, VirginiaMadison Square GardenNew York City
      1982 Bradley 68 Purdue 61Mitchell Anderson, BradleyMadison Square GardenNew York City
      1984 Michigan 83 Notre Dame 63 Tim McCormick, MichiganMadison Square GardenNew York City
      1985 UCLA 65 Indiana 62 Reggie Miller, UCLAMadison Square GardenNew York City
      1986 Ohio State 73 Wyoming 63 Brad Sellers, Ohio StateMadison Square GardenNew York City
      1988 Connecticut 72 Ohio State 67Phil Gamble, UConnMadison Square GardenNew York City
      1993 Minnesota 62 Georgetown 61 Voshon Lenard, MinnesotaMadison Square GardenNew York City
      1996 Nebraska 60 Saint Joseph's 56 Erick Strickland, NebraskaMadison Square GardenNew York City
      1997 Michigan [b 1] 82 Florida State 73 Robert Traylor, MichiganMadison Square GardenNew York City
      1998 Minnesota [b 2] 79 Penn State 72Kevin Clark, MinnesotaMadison Square GardenNew York City
      2004 Michigan 62 Rutgers 55 Daniel Horton, MichiganMadison Square GardenNew York City
      2006 South Carolina 76 Michigan 64 Renaldo Balkman, South CarolinaMadison Square GardenNew York City
      2008 Ohio State 92 Massachusetts 85 Kosta Koufos, Ohio StateMadison Square GardenNew York City
      2009 Penn State 69 Baylor 63Jamelle Cornley, Penn StateMadison Square GardenNew York City
      2012 Stanford 75 Minnesota 51Aaron Bright, StanfordMadison Square GardenNew York City
      2013 Baylor 74 Iowa 54 Pierre Jackson, BaylorMadison Square GardenNew York City
      2014 Minnesota 65 SMU 63Austin Hollins, MinnesotaMadison Square GardenNew York City
      2018 Penn State 82 Utah 66Lamar Stevens, Penn StateMadison Square GardenNew York City
      1. Participation and title vacated due to major NCAA violations.
      2. Participation and title vacated due to major NCAA violations.
      1. Affiliate member: Johns Hopkins

      Head Coach Compensation

      Guaranteed compensation is due to the coaches regardless of performance. Though most of the pay is directed from the university, some also comes in the form of guaranteed endorsements and other income streams. Most coaches also have performance-based bonuses that can significantly raise their salaries. [96]

      In 2024, three Big Ten member schools—Northwestern and USC, private institutions, and Penn State, exempt from most open records laws due to its status as what Pennsylvania calls a "state-related" institution—are not obligated to provide salary information for their head coaches. Despite this, both Penn State and Northwestern typically choose to provide this information.

      InstitutionHead coach2023-2024 guaranteed pay
      Michigan State Tom Izzo $6,200,000
      Illinois Brad Underwood $4,600,000
      Indiana Mike Woodson $4,200,000
      UCLA Mick Cronin $4,100,000
      Maryland Kevin Willard $4,000,000
      Oregon Dana Altman $3,775,000
      Purdue Matt Painter $3,550,000
      Wisconsin Greg Gard $3,550,000
      Ohio State Jake Diebler $2,500,000
      Michigan Dusty May $3,750,000
      Rutgers Steve Pikiell $3,250,000
      Nebraska Fred Hoiberg $3,250,000
      Iowa Fran McCaffery $3,200,000
      Washington Mike Hopkins $3,200,000
      Penn State Mike Rhoades $2,900,000
      Minnesota Ben Johnson $1,950,000
      Northwestern Chris Collins $2,893,064
      USC Andy Enfield NA

      Women's basketball

      Big Ten women's basketball teams have played a total of 16 championship games of the three most prominent national postseason tournaments—six in the NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament (since 1982), one in the Women's Basketball Invitation Tournament (since 2024), and nine in the Women's National Invitation Tournament Championship (since 1998). Three other championship game appearances (two in the NCAA, one in the WNIT) were made by current Big Ten members before they joined the conference. Purdue is the only Big Ten member to have won the NCAA women's basketball national title while a member of the conference. Both schools that joined in 2014, Maryland and Rutgers, won national titles before joining the Big Ten—Rutgers won the final AIAW championship in 1982, when it was a member of the Eastern 8, and Maryland won the NCAA title in 2006 as a member of the ACC. Big Ten women's basketball led conference attendance from 1993 to 1999. [104]

      Like the men's teams, the women's basketball teams in the Big Ten participated in the Big Ten–ACC Women's Challenge, which was founded in 2007 and ended in 2022. The Big Ten's record in the challenge was 1-11-3, with Indiana, Maryland, and Michigan being the only Big Ten teams without a losing record in the challenge.

      National championships, Final Fours, and NCAA tournament appearances

      Seasons are listed by the calendar years in which they ended. Italics indicate seasons before the school competed in the Big Ten.

      SchoolWomen's AIAW/NCAA
      Championships
      Women's AIAW/NCAA
      Final Fours
      Women's AIAW/NCAA
      Elite Eights
      Women's AIAW/NCAA
      Sweet Sixteens
      Women's AIAW/NCAA
      Tournament Appearances
      Illinois 2
      (1997, 1998)
      8
      (1982, 1986, 1987, 1997–2000, 2003)
      Indiana 1
      (1973)
      3
      (1972, 1974, 2021)
      2
      (2021, 2022)
      8
      (1983, 1994, 1995, 2002, 2016, 2019, 2021, 2022)
      Iowa 3
      (1993, 2023-24)
      6
      (1987, 1988, 1993, 2019, 2023-24)
      10
      (1987, 1988, 1989, 1993, 1996, 2015, 2019, 2021, 2023-24)
      29
      (1986–94, 1996–98, 2001, 2002, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010–15, 2018-19, 2021-24)
      Maryland 1
      (2006)
      6
      (1978, 1982, 1989, 2006, 2014, 2015)
      15
      (1978–82, 1988, 1989, 1992, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2023)
      20
      (1978–83, 1988, 1989, 1992, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2012–14, 2015, 2017, 2021, 2022, 2023)
      34
      (1978–84, 1986, 1988–93, 1997, 2001, 2004–09, 2011–14, 2015–19, 2021, 2022, 2023)
      Michigan 1
      (2022)
      2
      (2021, 2022)
      9
      (1990, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2012, 2013, 2018, 2019, 2021, 2022)
      Michigan State 1
      (2005)
      1
      (2005)
      3
      (2005, 2006, 2009)
      19
      (1977, 1991, 1996, 1997, 2003–07, 2009–14, 2016, 2017, 2019, 2021)
      Minnesota 1
      (2004)
      1
      (2004)
      4
      (1977, 2003, 2004, 2005)
      13
      (1977, 1981, 1982, 1994, 2002–06, 2008, 2009, 2015, 2018)
      Nebraska 2
      (2010, 2013)
      15
      (1988, 1993, 1996, 1998–2000, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2012–15, 2018, 2022)
      Northwestern 18
      (1982, 1987, 1990, 1991, 1993, 1997, 2015, 2021)
      Ohio State 1
      (1993)
      5
      (1975, 1985, 1987, 1993, 2023)
      13
      (1985–89, 1993, 2005, 2009, 2011, 2016, 2017, 2022, 2023)
      28
      (1975, 1978, 1984–90, 1993, 1996, 1999, 2003–12, 2015–18, 2022, 2023)
      Penn State 1
      (2000)
      4
      (1983, 1994, 2000, 2004)
      13
      (1982, 1983, 1985, 1986, 1992, 1994, 1996, 2000, 2002-04, 2012, 2014)
      26
      (1976, 1982-88, 1990, 1991, 1992–96, 1999–2005, 2011–14)
      Purdue 1
      (1999)
      3
      (1994, 1999, 2001)
      8
      (1994, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2007, 2009)
      12
      (1990, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2009)
      26
      (1989–92, 1994–2009, 2011–14, 2016, 2017)
      Rutgers 1
      (1982)
      3
      (1982, 2000, 2007)
      7
      (1986, 1987, 1999, 2000, 2005, 2007, 2008)
      11
      (1986–88, 1998–2000, 2005–09)
      27
      (1982, 1986–94, 1998–2001, 2003–12, 2015, 2019, 2021)
      Wisconsin 8
      (1982, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2010)

      Big Ten NCAA tournament champions, runners-up and locations

      Bold type indicates teams that competed as Big Ten members. Bold italics indicates teams that later became Big Ten members.

      YearChampionRunner-upVenue and city
      1993 Texas Tech 84 Ohio State 82 The Omni Atlanta
      1999 Purdue 62 Duke 45 San Jose Arena San Jose, California
      2001 Notre Dame 68 Purdue 66 Savvis Center St. Louis
      2005 Baylor 84 Michigan State 62 RCA Dome Indianapolis
      2006 Maryland 78 Duke 75 TD Banknorth Garden Boston
      2007 Tennessee 59 Rutgers 46 Quicken Loans Arena Cleveland
      2023 LSU 102 Iowa 85 American Airlines Center Dallas
      2024 South Carolina 87 Iowa 75 Rocket Mortgage Fieldhouse Cleveland

      Big Ten Women's Basketball Invitation Tournament championship games

      YearChampionRunner-upVenueCity
      2024 Illinois 71 Villanova 57 Hinkle Fieldhouse Indianapolis

      Big Ten Women's National Invitation Tournament championship games

      Bold type indicates teams that competed as Big Ten members. Bold italics indicates teams that later became Big Ten members.

      YearChampionRunner-upVenueCity
      1998 Penn State 59 Baylor 56 Ferrell Center Waco, Texas
      1999 Arkansas 67 Wisconsin 64 Bud Walton Arena Fayetteville, Arkansas
      2000 Wisconsin 75 Florida 74 Kohl Center Madison, Wisconsin
      2001 Ohio State 62 New Mexico 61 University Arena Albuquerque, New Mexico
      2007 Wyoming 72 Wisconsin 56 Arena-Auditorium Laramie, Wyoming
      2008 Marquette 81 Michigan State 66 Breslin Center East Lansing, Michigan
      2014 Rutgers 56 UTEP 54 Don Haskins Center El Paso, Texas
      2017 Michigan 89 Georgia Tech 79 Calihan Hall Detroit, Michigan
      2018 Indiana 65 Virginia Tech 57 Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall Bloomington, Indiana
      2019 Arizona 56 Northwestern 42 McKale Center Tucson, Arizona

      Field hockey

      Big Ten field hockey programs have won 11 NCAA Championships, although only three of these titles were won by schools as Big Ten members. Maryland won eight national championships as a member of the ACC, second most in the sport all-time. Penn State's two AIAW championships were also won before it became a Big Ten member and before the NCAA sponsored women's sports.

      SchoolNCAA national championshipNCAA runner-upNCAA Final FoursNCAA tournament appearances
      Indiana 2