College Park, Maryland

Last updated
College Park, Maryland
City of College Park
2010 02 12 - 6161-6162 - College Park - US 1 at Knox Rd (4360650658).jpg
Downtown College Park
Flag of College Park, Maryland.png
Flag
Seal of College Park, Maryland.png
Seal
Prince George's County Maryland Incorporated and Unincorporated areas College Park Highlighted.svg
USA Maryland location map.svg
Red pog.svg
College Park
Location within the state of Maryland
Usa edcp location map.svg
Red pog.svg
College Park
College Park (the United States)
Coordinates: 38°59′48″N76°55′39″W / 38.99667°N 76.92750°W / 38.99667; -76.92750 Coordinates: 38°59′48″N76°55′39″W / 38.99667°N 76.92750°W / 38.99667; -76.92750
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Maryland.svg  Maryland
County Flag of Prince George's County, Maryland (1963-present).svg Prince George's
Founded1856
Incorporated 1945
Government
  MayorPatrick L. Wojahn [1]
Area
[2]
  Total5.68 sq mi (14.72 km2)
  Land5.61 sq mi (14.53 km2)
  Water0.07 sq mi (0.18 km2)
Elevation
69 ft (21 m)
Population
 (2010) [3]
  Total30,413
  Estimate 
(2018) [4]
32,196
  Density5,757.08/sq mi (2,222.68/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (EST)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
ZIP Codes
20740–20742
Area code 301
FIPS code 24-18750
GNIS feature ID2390578
Website www.collegeparkmd.gov

The City of College Park is in Prince George's County, Maryland, United States, [5] and is approximately four miles (6.4 km) from the northeast border of Washington. The population was 30,413 at the 2010 United States Census. It is best known as the home of the University of Maryland, College Park, and since 1994 the city has also been home to the National Archives at College Park, a facility of the U.S. National Archives, as well as to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP). [6]

Contents

History

Development

College Park was developed beginning in 1889 near the Maryland Agricultural College (later the University of Maryland) and the College Station stop of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The suburb was incorporated in 1945 and included the subdivisions of College Park, Lakeland, Berwyn, Oak Spring, Branchville, Daniel's Park, and Hollywood.

The original College Park subdivision was first platted in 1872 by Eugene Campbell. The area remained undeveloped and was re-platted in 1889 by John O. Johnson and Samuel Curriden, Washington real estate developers. The original 125-acre (0.51 km2) tract was divided into a grid-street pattern with long, narrow building lots, with a standard lot size of 50 feet (15 m) by 200 feet (61 m). College Park developed rapidly, catering to those who were seeking to escape the crowded Washington, D.C., as well as to a rapidly expanding staff of college faculty and employees.

College Park originally included single-family residences constructed in the Shingle, Queen Anne, and Stick styles, as well as modest vernacular dwellings. Commercial development increased in the 1920s, aided by the increased automobile traffic and the growing campus along Baltimore Avenue / Route 1.

By the late 1930s, most of the original subdivision had been partially developed. Several fraternities and sororities from the University of Maryland built houses in the neighborhood. After World War II, construction consisted mostly of infill of ranch and split-level houses. After incorporation in 1945, the city continued to grow, and a municipal center was built in 1959. [7]

The Lakeland neighborhood was developed beginning in 1892 around the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, whose Branchville and Calvert Road depots were located approximately one mile to the north and south, respectively. Lakeland was created by Edwin Newman, who improved the original 238 acres (0.96 km2) located to the west of the railroad. He also built a number of the original homes, a small town hall, and a general store. The area was originally envisioned as a resort-type community. However, due to the flood-prone, low-lying topography, the neighborhood attracted a lower-income population and became an area for African-American settlement. Around 1900, the Baltimore Gold Fish Company built five artificial lakes in the area to spawn goldfish and rarer species of fish. A one-room school was built in 1903 for the African-American population; a new school was built in 1925. [7]

The Berwyn neighborhood was developed beginning about 1885 adjacent to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. It was created by Francis Shannabrook, a Pennsylvanian who purchased a tract of land between Baltimore Avenue and the railroad tracks. Shannabrook established a small depot, built a general store, and erected approximately 15 homes in the area to attract moderate-income families looking to move out of Washington. The neighborhood began to grow after 1900 when the City and Suburban Electric Railway entered the area. By 1925, approximately 100 single-family homes existed, mostly two-story, wood-frame buildings. The community housing continued to develop in the 1930s and 1940s with one story bungalows, Cape Cods, and Victorians and, later, raised ranches and split level homes. [7]

The Daniels Park neighborhood was developed, beginning in 1905 on the east and west sides of the City and Suburban Electric Railway in north College Park. Daniels Park was created by Edward Daniels on 47 acres (19 ha) of land. This small residential subdivision was improved with single-family houses arranged along a grid pattern of streets. The houses—built between 1905 and the 1930s—range in style from American Foursquares to bungalows. [7]

The Hollywood neighborhood was developed in the early 20th century along the City and Suburban Electric Railway. Edward Daniels, the developer of Daniels Park, planned the Hollywood subdivision as a northern extension of that earlier community. Development in Hollywood was slow until after World War II, when Albert Turner acquired large tracts of the northern part of the neighborhood in the late 1940s. Turner was able to develop and market brick and frame three-bedroom bungalows beginning in 1950. By 1952, an elementary school had been built. Hollywood Neighborhood Park, a 21-acre (8.5 ha) facility along the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad line, is operated by the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission. [7]

Later events

In 1943, due to World War II efforts to conserve rail transport, the Washington Senators relocated their spring training camp to College Park. The locations of 1943 Major League Baseball spring training camps were limited to an area east of the Mississippi River and north of the Ohio River. [8]

On September 24, 2001, a multiple-vortex F3 tornado hit the area. This storm moved at peak intensity through the University of Maryland College Park campus, and then moved north parallel to I-95 to the Laurel area, where F3 damage was also noted. The damage path from the storm was measured at 17.5 miles (28.2 km) in length. The tornado caused two deaths and 55 injuries and $101 million in property damage. The two deaths were sisters who died when their car was picked up and hurled over a building before being slammed to the ground. Both young women were University of Maryland students. [9] This tornado was part of the Maryland, Virginia, and Washington, D.C., tornado outbreak of 2001, one of the most dramatic recent tornado events to directly affect the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area.

Image produced at the Student Design Charrette for a new College Park. Pedestrian street.jpg
Image produced at the Student Design Charrette for a new College Park.

By the turn of the 21st century, College Park began experiencing significant development pressure. Both students and city residents acknowledged the city's lack of amenities and poor sense of place. In 2002, the city and county passed the Route 1 Sector Plan, which allowed and encouraged mixed use development along College Park's main roadway. Recent projects—like the East Campus Redevelopment Initiative, The University View, The Varsity, and Landmark student apartments and the Northgate Condos—give many in the community hope that the city, like other notable American college towns, might one day have a vibrant downtown and a diverse population.[ citation needed ] In 2004, College Park annexed 72 acres (29 ha) that were previously considered to be in Beltsville, an unincorporated area; this tract included a Holiday Inn and an IKEA. [10]

The University of Maryland's Student Government Association sponsored a design charrette in April 2006 to envision the future of College Park. In July 2006, a group of students created Rethink College Park—a community group providing a website to share information about development and to encourage public dialogue.

Since 2009, other notable architectural additions to College Park have been: a parking garage (with The Ledo Restaurant on ground level) in downtown near the intersection of Route 1 and Knox Road; The University View and The Varsity student apartment towers with ground floor retail businesses; graduate school apartment towers adjacent to The View apartments; and The Hotel at the University of Maryland.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1950 11,170
1960 18,48265.5%
1970 26,15641.5%
1980 23,614−9.7%
1990 21,927−7.1%
2000 24,65712.5%
2010 30,41323.3%
Est. 201832,196 [11] 5.9%
U.S. Decennial Census [12]

The median income for a household in the city was $50,168, and the median income for a family was $62,759 (these figures had risen to $66,953 and $82,295 respectively as of a 2007 estimate [13] ). Males had a median income of $40,445 versus $31,631 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,026. About 4.2% of families and 19.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.9% of those under age 18 and 9.2% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the census [3] of 2010, there were 30,413 people, 6,757 households, and 2,852 families residing in the city. The population density was 5,392.4 inhabitants per square mile (2,082.0/km2). There were 8,212 housing units at an average density of 1,456.0 per square mile (562.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 63.0% White, 14.3% African American, 0.3% Native American, 12.7% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 6.0% from other races, and 3.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.9% of the population.

There were 6,757 households of which 18.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 30.6% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 57.8% were non-families. 24.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.18.

The median age in the city was 21.3 years. 7.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 60.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 15.7% were from 25 to 44; 11% were from 45 to 64; and 5.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 53.1% male and 46.9% female.

2000 census

As of the census [14] of 2000, there were 24,657 people, 6,030 households, and 3,039 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,537.5 people per square mile (1,753.2/km²). There were 6,245 housing units at an average density of 1,149.2 per square mile (444.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 68.82% White, 15.93% Black or African American, 0.33% Native American, 10.03% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 2.57% from other races, and 2.31% from two or more races. 5.54% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 6,030 households out of which 19.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.6% were married couples living together, 8.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 49.6% were non-families. 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the city, the age distribution of the population shows 10.5% under the age of 18, 51.3% from 18 to 24, 19.8% from 25 to 44, 11.3% from 45 to 64, and 7.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 22 years. For every 100 females, there were 110.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 111.2 males.

Government

College Park has a Council-Manager form of government. The city manager is appointed by the city council and the mayor elected every two years. The council has eight members, representing four districts in the city. City Council meetings are held once a week at the College Park City Hall.

The current Mayor of College Park is Patrick L. Wojahn, who took office in 2015. Previous mayors were: [15]

College Park has six government departments:

Prince George's County Police Department District 1 Station in Hyattsville serves College Park. [16]

The U.S. Postal Service operates the College Park Post Office and the North College Park Post Office. [17] [18]

As of September 2011, College Park belongs to Maryland's 5th congressional district.

Geography

College Park is located at 38°59′48″N76°55′39″W / 38.99667°N 76.92750°W / 38.99667; -76.92750 (38.996560, -76.927509). [19]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.68 square miles (14.71 km2), of which 5.64 square miles (14.61 km2) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km2) is water. [20]

Climate

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen climate classification system, College Park has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps. [21]

Neighborhoods

Adjacent areas

Economy

According to the City's 2017 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, [22] the top employers in the city are:

#EmployerEmployees
1 University of Maryland, College Park 17,072
2 University of Maryland University College 2,000
3 National Archives and Records Administration 1,700
4 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 817
5 Food and Drug Administration 800
6 IKEA 450
7 The Home Depot 177
8College Park Hyundai 162
9The Hotel at the University of Maryland150
10 American Center for Physics 125

Transportation

I-95/I-495 northbound in College Park 2019-06-03 11 49 56 View north along the outer loop of the Capital Beltway (Interstate 95 and Interstate 495) between Exit 23 and Exit 25 in College Park, Prince George's County, Maryland.jpg
I-95/I-495 northbound in College Park

Roads and highways

The most prominent highway serving College Park is Interstate 95/Interstate 495, the Capital Beltway. I-495 encircles Washington, D.C. via the Capital Beltway, providing access to the city and its many suburbs. I-95 only follows the eastern portion of the beltway, diverging away from the beltway near both its north and south ends. To the north, I-95 passes through Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York City and Boston on its way to Canada, while to the south, it traverses Richmond on its way to Florida.

Primary access to College Park from I-95/I-495 is provided via an interchange with U.S. Route 1, which traverses downtown College Park along Baltimore Avenue. Maryland State Route 193 also passes through the city, following University Boulevard and Greenbelt Road from west to east.

Airport

College Park Airport is the oldest continuously operating airport in the United States and is one of the oldest airports in the world, having been in continuous operation since 1909. It originated as the site where the U.S. government began to train pilots, under the tutelage of Wilbur Wright, for military purposes. Its future status is uncertain, as it lies just a few miles outside the restricted airspace of Washington, D.C. In 1977, the airport was added to the National Register of Historic Places. [23]

Area commercial airports include Baltimore-Washington International Airport, Reagan National Airport, and Washington Dulles International Airport.

Public transportation

College Park has a station on Washington Metro's Green Line. CollegeParkMetroStationEast.jpg
College Park has a station on Washington Metro's Green Line.

College Park–University of Maryland Station on the Washington Metro's Green Line is in College Park; a large commuter parking garage was completed in 2004 adjacent to the Metro station. MARC trains run on CSX tracks adjacent to the Green Line and stop at a small station next to the College Park Metro station. The Metro station lies at what had been the historic junction of Calvert Road and the CSX tracks.

College Park had streetcar service from 1903 to 1962 along what is now Rhode Island Avenue and the College Park Trolley Trail.

College Park will also have three Purple Line light rail stations when the system opens in 2023. These will be the Campus Center station, East Campus station, and a station connected to the existing College Park-University of Maryland Metro station.

Historic sites

The following is a list of historic sites in College Park identified by the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission. [24] Part of the city is located within the Calvert Hills Historic District; listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2002. [25]

Site nameImageLocationM-NCPPC Inventory
Number
Comment
1 Baker-Holliday House 5005 Huron Street66-027-24Located in Daniels Park.
2 Bowers-Sargent House 9312 Rhode Island Avenue66-027-28Located in Daniels Park.
3 College Park Airport College Park to Laurel Tornado.jpg 6709 Corporal Frank S. Scott Drive66-004Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, September 23, 1977
4 College Park Woman's Club 4711 Knox Road66-021-09Owned by the City of College Park.
5 Cory House Cory house.jpg 4710 College Avenue66-021-08
6 Holbrook House 4618 College Avenue66-021-31
7 Lake House (Presbyterian Parsonage) 8524 Potomac Avenue66-018Located in Berwyn.
8 LaValle House 5013 Huron Street66-027-25Located in Daniels Park.
9 McDonnell House 7400 Dartmouth Avenue66-021-10
10 National Archives Archeological Site Address Restricted66-036Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, August 22, 1996
11 The Rossborough Inn UMD Rossborough Inn.JPG Baltimore Avenue (US 1)66-035-02Located on the University of Maryland campus.
12 Taliaferro House 7406 Columbia Avenue66-021-30

Media

The city is part of the Washington, D.C. television market (DMA #9). The city of College Park and the campus of the University of Maryland are the setting for the 2016 novel, "Journey" {Sunfall, book 1} by D. Gideon.

Education

University Hills Park pond, College Park, Maryland University Hills park.jpg
University Hills Park pond, College Park, Maryland
HJ Patterson Hall, University of Maryland, College Park HJ Patterson building at UMCP, main entrance, morning, August 21, 2006.jpg
HJ Patterson Hall, University of Maryland, College Park
McKeldin Library, University of Maryland, College Park McKeldin Library, front view, mid-afternoon light, August 21, 2006.jpg
McKeldin Library, University of Maryland, College Park

Colleges and universities

The University of Maryland, College Park, the flagship institution of the University System of Maryland, is located within the College Park city limits.

Primary and secondary schools

Public schools

College Park is served by Prince George's County Public Schools. The city is zoned to several different schools. [27]

Elementary school students are zoned to: [28]

  • Hollywood Elementary School (in College Park)
  • Paint Branch Elementary School (in College Park)
  • Berwyn Heights Elementary School (in Berwyn Heights)
  • University Park Elementary School (in University Park)
  • Cherokee Lane Elementary School (Adelphi CDP)

Middle school students are zoned to: [29]

  • Greenbelt Middle School (in Greenbelt)
  • Hyattsville Middle School (in Hyattsville)
  • Buck Lodge Middle School (Adelphi CDP)

High school students are zoned to: [30]

Other area public high schools include: Eleanor Roosevelt High School (Greenbelt). [31]

PGCPS previously operated College Park Elementary School. For a period Friends Community School occupied the building, but it moved out in 2007. The nascent College Park Academy attempted to lease the previous College Park elementary building, but there was community opposition. [32] The grade 6-12 charter school currently is located in Riverdale Park. [33]

Prior to the Civil Rights Movement of the mid-20th Century, white and black students attended schools that were racially segregated by law. Lakeland Elementary School, a school for black children, opened in 1925, and after Lakeland and other area communities asked for a high school for black students, Lakeland High School opened in 1928. [34] The latter became one of two senior high schools in Prince George's County for black people, the other being Frederick Douglass High School, then in Upper Marlboro. [35] Lakeland High and Elementary were financed by the Rosenwald Fund and therefore were Rosenwald Schools. [36] In 1950, Lakeland High was replaced by Fairmont Heights High School near Fairmount Heights. [37] In turn, Lakeland Elementary School moved into the former high school building. [38] Circa 1964, legal racial segregation ended in Prince George's County schools. [37]

Private schools

Private schools include: [31]

  • Dar-us-Salaam/Al Huda School, K–12 (College Park) [39] [40]
  • Berwyn Baptist School, PreK–8
  • Friends Community School, K–8
  • Holy Redeemer School, K–8
  • Saint Francis International School St. Mark Campus, K–8, Hyattsville [41]  – formerly St. Mark the Evangelist School, [42] closed and merged into Saint Francis International, which opened in 2010. [43]

Museums

City-student politics

Like many college towns, College Park has had its share of political controversy. Occasionally, University of Maryland students plan voter registration drives and seek to elect one of their own to the city council. City residents, including students living within the city are eligible [44] to run for city council if they are at least 18 years of age. Over the past twenty years there have been multiple attempts, none of which were successful until Marcus Afzali won a seat in 2009.

Related Research Articles

Prince Georges County, Maryland County in Maryland

Prince George's County is located in the U.S. state of Maryland, bordering the eastern portion of Washington, D.C. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, the population was 863,420, making it the second-most populous county in Maryland, behind Montgomery County. Its county seat is Upper Marlboro. It is one of the richest African American-majority counties in the United States, with five of its communities identified in a 2015 top ten list.

Accokeek, Maryland Census-designated place in Maryland, United States of America

Accokeek, "at the edge of the hill" in Algonquin, is a census-designated place (CDP) located in Prince George's County, Maryland, United States. The CDP is located on the Potomac River, borders Charles County and is approximately 17 miles from Washington. It is a part of the Washington metropolitan area. The population of the CDP, as of the 2010 United States Census was 10,573, making it the 118th most populous place in the state of Maryland.

Adelphi, Maryland Census-designated place in Maryland

Adelphi is an unincorporated area and census-designated place in Prince George's County, Maryland, United States. The population was 15,086 at the 2010 United States Census. Adelphi includes the following subdivisions; Adelphi, Adelphi Park, Adelphi Hills, Adelphi Terrace, Adelphi Village, Buck Lodge, Chatham, Cool Spring Terrace, Hillandale Forest, Holly Hill Manor, Knollwood, Lewiston, and White Oak Manor.

Beltsville, Maryland CDP in Maryland

Beltsville is a census-designated place (CDP) in northern Prince George's County, Maryland, United States. The community was named for Truman Belt, a local landowner. The population was 16,772 at the 2010 census. Beltsville includes the unincorporated community of Vansville.

Berwyn Heights, Maryland Town in Maryland

Berwyn Heights is a town in Prince George's County, Maryland, United States. The population was 3,123 at the 2010 United States Census. It is bordered by College Park to the west, Greenbelt to the northeast, and Riverdale Park to the south.

Bladensburg, Maryland Town in Maryland

Bladensburg is a town in Prince George's County, Maryland, United States. The population was 9,148 at the 2010 census. Areas in Bladensburg are located within ZIP code 20710. Bladensburg is 8.6 miles (13.8 km) from central Washington.

Greenbelt, Maryland City in Maryland, United States

Greenbelt is a city in Prince George's County, Maryland, United States, and a suburb of Washington. Greenbelt is notable for being the first and the largest of the three experimental and controversial New Deal Greenbelt Towns, planned and built by the Federal government. The cooperative community was conceived in 1935 by Undersecretary of Agriculture Rexford Guy Tugwell, whose perceived collectivist ideology attracted opposition to the Greenbelt Towns project throughout its short duration. The project came into legal existence in the spring of 1935. On April 8, 1935, Congress passed the Emergency Relief Appropriation Act of 1935. Under the authority granted to him by this legislation, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued an executive order, on May 1, 1935, establishing the United States Resettlement Administration (RA/RRA).

Hyattsville, Maryland City in Maryland

Hyattsville is a city in Prince George's County, Maryland, United States, and also a close, urban suburb of Washington. The population was 17,557 at the 2010 United States Census.

Langley Park, Maryland Census-designated place in Maryland

Langley Park is an unincorporated area and census-designated place (CDP) in Prince George's County, Maryland, United States. It is located inside the Capital Beltway, on the northwest edge of Prince George's County, bordering Montgomery County. Langley Park is contained between University Boulevard to the south, the Northwest Branch Anacostia River to the north, Phelps Road to the east, and the Prince Georges County / Montgomery County line to the west. An extremely small stretch of Piney Branch Road which goes into Prince George's County, goes into the Langley Park neighborhood as well, just before it crosses the Northwest Branch Anacostia River and intersects New Hampshire Avenue. While most of the Langley Park neighborhood contains the Hyattsville postal zip code of 20783, there is a small portion of Langley Park located west of New Hampshire Avenue, but east of the Prince George's County/ Montgomery County Line, which contains the Silver Spring postal zip code of 20903. Langley Park is surrounded by the communities of Adelphi, Silver Spring, Takoma Park, Carole Highlands, and Lewisdale. As of the 2010 census, it had a population of 18,755.

Laurel, Maryland City in Maryland, United States

Laurel is a city in Maryland, United States, located almost midway between Washington and Baltimore on the banks of the Patuxent River. While the city limits are entirely in northern Prince George's County, outlying developments extend into Anne Arundel, Montgomery and Howard counties. Founded as a mill town in the early 19th century, Laurel expanded local industry and was later able to become an early commuter town for Washington and Baltimore workers following the arrival of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in 1835. Largely residential today, the city maintains a historic district centered on its Main Street, highlighting its industrial past.

Mount Rainier, Maryland City in Maryland

Mount Rainier is a city in Prince George's County, Maryland, United States, bordering Washington. The population was 8,080 at the 2010 census. Mount Rainier is contained between the Northwest Branch Anacostia River, Cedar Lane Alley, and 34th Street to the north, 37th Street and 37th Place to the northeast, Upshur Street and Queens Chapel Road to the west, the Cargo Train/ the former 82 Streetcar tracks to the east, and Eastern Avenue NE to the south. Mount Rainier got its start as a streetcar suburb. According to local tradition, surveyors from the Pacific Northwest named the town, giving the streets names such as "Shasta" and "Cascade". Historic U.S. 1 runs through the center of the town and serves as the main street and central business district.

North Brentwood, Maryland Town in Maryland

North Brentwood is a town in Prince George's County, Maryland, United States. The population was 517 at the 2010 census. The municipality of North Brentwood is located north of Washington and is surrounded by the communities of Brentwood, Hyattsville, and Cottage City, and the nearby Mount Rainier. The Town of North Brentwood was incorporated in 1924, and was the first African-American-majority municipality in Maryland.

Riverdale Park, Maryland Town in Maryland

Riverdale Park, formerly known and often referred to as Riverdale, Maryland is a semi-urban town in Prince George's County, Maryland, United States, a suburb in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area. The population was 6,956 as of the 2010 U.S. Census. The population as of 2018 is approximately 7,225, according to the US Census Bureau and other entities.

University Park, Maryland Town in Maryland

University Park is a town in Prince George's County, Maryland, United States. The population was 2,548 at the 2010 census.

Bladensburg High School Public secondary school in Bladensburg, Maryland, U.S.

Bladensburg High School is a public high school located in Bladensburg, Maryland. The school, which serves grades 9 through 12, is a part of the Prince George's County Public Schools district.

Prince Georges County Public Schools public school district for Prince George’s County, Maryland, United States

Prince George's County Public Schools (PGCPS) is a large public school district administered by the government of Prince George's County, Maryland, United States, and is overseen by the Maryland State Department of Education. The school system is headquartered in Upper Marlboro and the district serves Prince George's County. The district is headed by Monica Goldson and a 14-member Board of Education.

Avondale, Maryland Unincorporated community in Maryland

Avondale is an unincorporated community in Prince George's County Maryland, United States. It is contained between Eastern Avenue NE to the south, Queens Chapel Road (MD-500) to the east, and the Northwest Branch Anacostia River to the north and west.

Summerfield, Maryland Census-designated place in Maryland

Summerfield is a census-designated place near Landover in Prince George's County, Maryland, United States. The population of the CDP was 10,898 at the 2010 census. It is a suburb of Washington

College Park Academy School in the United States

College Park Academy is a charter school middle and high school located in Riverdale Park, Maryland. The school is a joint collaboration project with the University of Maryland, College Park. This will provide benefits such as interaction with college students and allow students to take college prep classes.

Lakeland High School was a high school for black children in the Lakeland community of Prince George's County, Maryland, now a part of College Park. It was the second high school for black children in the county. The building is currently used as a church.

References

  1. "College Park, Prince George's County, Maryland". Maryland Manual On-Line. Maryland State Archives. January 31, 2017. Retrieved May 15, 2017.
  2. "2017 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jan 2, 2019.
  3. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 25, 2013.
  4. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  5. "College Park". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey.
  6. "NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction" (PDF). National Weather Service. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 11 October 2016.
  7. 1 2 3 4 5 "Community Summary Sheet, Prince George's County" (PDF). College Park, Maryland. Maryland State Highway Administration, 1999. May 10, 2008.
  8. Suehsdorf, A. D. (1978). The Great American Baseball Scrapbook, p. 103. Random House. ISBN   0-394-50253-1.
  9. "NWS Sterling, VA – Sept 24 tornado report". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Archived from the original on 2003-03-10. Retrieved 2014-06-03.
  10. Mullan, Meghan (2004-01-08). "Annexation of IKEA, Holiday Inn is finalized". The Gazette . Retrieved 2018-09-09.
  11. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved July 23, 2019.
  12. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  13. "College Park, MD Factsheet". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2009-09-15.
  14. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  15. "College Park Mayors". Maryland Manual On-Line. Maryland State Archives. December 7, 2015. Retrieved May 15, 2017.
  16. "District 1 Station - Hyattsville. Prince George's County Police Department. Retrieved on September 9, 2018. Beat map.
  17. "COLLEGE PARK." U.S. Postal Service. Retrieved on September 11, 2018. "4815 CALVERT RD COLLEGE PARK, MD 20740-9997"
  18. "NORTH COLLEGE PARK." U.S. Postal Service. Retrieved on September 11, 2018. "9591 BALTIMORE AVE COLLEGE PARK, MD 20740-9996"
  19. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  20. "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 1, 2012. Retrieved January 25, 2013.
  21. "College Park, Maryland Köppen Climate Classification (Weatherbase)". Weatherbase.
  22. "Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2017". City of College Park, Maryland. p. 71. Retrieved April 20, 2019.
  23. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. April 15, 2008.
  24. M-NCPPC Illustrated Inventory of Historic Sites: Prince George's County, Maryland (Prince George's County, Maryland), 2006 Archived 2008-07-25 at the Wayback Machine .
  25. "Calvert Hills Historic District". Maryland Historical Trust. Retrieved October 29, 2008.
  26. www.wmucradio.com.
  27. "District_BIG_WALL_MAP_2009d_36x48_July_2013.pdf." City of College Park. Retrieved on January 31, 2018. See also: City's listing of area schools, neighborhood map
  28. "NEIGHBORHOOD ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS AND BOUNDARIES SCHOOL YEAR 2017-2018." Prince George's County Public Schools. Retrieved on January 31, 2018.
  29. "NEIGHBORHOOD MIDDLE SCHOOLS AND BOUNDARIES SCHOOL YEAR 2017-2018." Prince George's County Public Schools. Retrieved on January 31, 2018.
  30. "NEIGHBORHOOD HIGH SCHOOLS AND BOUNDARIES SCHOOL YEAR 2017-2018." Prince George's County Public Schools. Retrieved on January 31, 2018.
  31. 1 2 "Local Schools." Prince George's County Public Schools. Retrieved on January 31, 2018.
  32. Weaver, Rosanna Landis (2013-01-15). "Charter school to open in Hyattsville". Hyattsville Life & Times. Retrieved 2018-09-06.
  33. "Contact Us." College Park Academy Public Charter School. Retrieved on September 6, 2018. "5751 Rivertech Court Riverdale Park, MD 20737"
  34. Lakeland Community Heritage Project Inc. Lakeland: African Americans in College Park. Arcadia Publishing, September 18, 2012. ISBN   1439622744, 9781439622742. Google Books PT32.
  35. Meyer, Eugene K. (2000-09-28). "Douglass High: A School of Their Own". Washington Post . Retrieved 2018-09-06.
  36. Lakeland Community Heritage Project Inc. Lakeland: African Americans in College Park. Arcadia Publishing, September 18, 2012. ISBN   1439622744, 9781439622742. Google Books PT31-PT32.
  37. 1 2 "Fairmont Heights High School History". Fairmont Heights High School. 2018-09-04. Archived from the original on 2005-10-04. Retrieved 2018-09-04.
  38. African-American Historic and Cultural Resources in Prince Georges County, Maryland . The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, February 2012. p. 66 (PDF p. 15/152). Also available on Issuu, on document page 70.
  39. "Contact Us." Al Huda School. Retrieved on February 1, 2018. "5301 Edgewood Road, College Park, MD 20740"
  40. "About Al-Huda School." Al Huda School. Retrieved on February 1, 2018.
  41. "Contact Us." Saint Francis International School. Retrieved on January 31, 2018. "St. Mark Campus 7501 Adelphi Road Hyattsville, MD 20783"
  42. "St. Mark's School in Hyattsville holds reunion to marks its 50th year ." Catholic Standard', Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington. Wednesday, October 15, 2008. Retrieved on January 31, 2018. "St. Mark Campus 7501 Adelphi Road Hyattsville, MD 20783"
  43. Roberts, Tom. "Maryland Catholic school finds its footing amid demographic shifts." Catholic Standard', Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington. Wednesday, October 15, 2008. Retrieved on February 1, 2018.
  44. Maryland State Board of Elections. "Voter Registration Introduction".
  45. Michael Mann Archived 2007-09-27 at the Wayback Machine
  46. "Student Government Association (SGA)".
  47. "- The Diamondback". Archived from the original on 27 February 2012. Retrieved 27 July 2016.
  48. "Marcus D. Afzali (I)". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on September 30, 2012.

Further reading