Frederick County, Maryland

Last updated

Frederick County, Maryland
Frederick city.jpg
Downtown Frederick in June 2014
Flag of Frederick County, Maryland.png
Flag
Seal of Frederick County, Maryland.png
Seal
Nicknames: 
"Frederick", "FredCo"
Map of Maryland highlighting Frederick County.svg
Location in the State of Maryland
Country Flag of the United States.svg United States
State Flag of Maryland.svg  Maryland
FoundedJune 10, 1748
County seat Frederick
Government
  County ExecutiveJan Gardner
  County CouncilPresident M.C. Keegan-Ayer (D-MD)
Vice President Michael Blue (R-MD)
Jerry Donald (D-MD)
Steve McKay (R-MD)
Jessica Fitzwater (D-MD)
Kai Hagen (D-MD)
Phil Dacey (R-MD) [1] [2]
Area
  Total1,730 km2 (667 sq mi)
  Land1,700 km2 (660 sq mi)
  Water19 km2 (7.2 sq mi)
Population
 (2010)
  Total240,336
  Estimate 
(2019)
259,547
  Density140/km2 (360/sq mi)
Time zone Eastern (EST)
  Summer (DST) EDT
ZIP
21701,21702,21703,21704,21705,21709
Area codes 301, 240
Congressional districts 6th, 8th
Website http://www.FrederickCountyMD.gov/

Frederick County is located in the northern part of the U.S. state of Maryland. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, the population was 240,336. [3] The county seat is Frederick. [4]

Contents

Frederick County is included in the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area. Like other outlying sections of the Washington metropolitan area, Frederick County has experienced a rapid population increase in recent years. [5] [6] It borders the southern border of Pennsylvania and the northeastern border of Virginia.

The county is home to Catoctin Mountain Park (encompassing the presidential retreat Camp David) and to the U.S. Army's Fort Detrick. Notable persons from here include Francis Scott Key, Chris Rose, Zach Taylor, Matt Bennett, Thomas Johnson, Roger B. Taney, and Barbara Fritchie.

Etymology

The namesake of Frederick County and its county seat is unknown, but it probably was either Frederick, Prince of Wales, or Frederick Calvert, 6th Baron Baltimore. [7]

History

Frederick County was created in 1748 by the Province of Maryland from parts of Prince George's County and Baltimore County.

In 1776 following Independence, Frederick County was divided into three parts. The westernmost portion became Washington County, named after George Washington, the southernmost portion became Montgomery County, named after another Revolutionary War general, Richard Montgomery. The northern portion remained Frederick County.

In 1837 a part of Frederick County was combined with a part of Baltimore County to form Carroll County which is east of current day Frederick County.

The county has a number of properties on the National Register of Historic Places. [8]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 667 square miles (1,730 km2), of which 660 square miles (1,700 km2) is land and 7.2 square miles (19 km2) (1.1%) is water. [10] It is the largest county in Maryland in terms of land area. [11]

Frederick County straddles the boundary between the Piedmont Plateau Region and the Appalachian Mountains. The county's two prominent ridges, Catoctin Mountain and South Mountain, form an extension of the Blue Ridge. The Middletown Valley lies between them.

Attractions in the Frederick area include the Clustered Spires, a monument to Francis Scott Key, the National Museum of Civil War Medicine, Monocacy National Battlefield and South Mountain battlefields, and the Schifferstadt Architectural Museum.

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Major highways

I-70 and US 40 in Frederick County 2019-07-24 11 33 44 View east along Interstate 70 and U.S. Route 40 (Baltimore National Pike) from the overpass for Mussetter Road in Linganore, Frederick County, Maryland.jpg
I-70 and US 40 in Frederick County

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1790 30,791
1800 31,5232.4%
1810 34,4379.2%
1820 40,45917.5%
1830 45,78913.2%
1840 36,405−20.5%
1850 40,98712.6%
1860 46,59113.7%
1870 47,5722.1%
1880 50,4826.1%
1890 49,512−1.9%
1900 51,9204.9%
1910 52,6731.5%
1920 52,541−0.3%
1930 54,4403.6%
1940 57,3125.3%
1950 62,2878.7%
1960 71,93015.5%
1970 84,92718.1%
1980 114,79235.2%
1990 150,20830.9%
2000 195,27730.0%
2010 233,38519.5%
2019 (est.)259,547 [12] 11.2%
U.S. Decennial Census [13]
1790-1960 [14] 1900-1990 [15]
1990-2000 [16] 2010–2018 [3]

Frederick County has experienced a rapid increase in population in recent years, including that of minority groups. [5] [6]

2000 census

The summary statistics for Frederick County from the 2000 U.S. Census are provided to compare and contrast with the more current data from the 2010 Census. The following table includes the total persons, sex and self-designated ethnicity based on 2000 Census; additional details are archived at the Maryland State Government website.

2000 Census total population: 195,277

Male: 96,079 (49.2%) Female: 99,198 (50.8%)

Ethnicity as percent total population: White: 176,965 (90.6%) Black or African American: 13,605 (7.0%) American Indian and Alaskan: 1,083 (0.6%) Asian: 4,066 (2.1%) Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 156 (0.1%) Some other ethnicity: 2,434 (1.2%) The total (all races) of those self-identifying as Hispanic or Latino origin made up 2.4%, and those persons who were white alone made up 88.1%.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 233,385 people, 84,800 households, and 61,198 families residing in the county. [17] The population density was 353.5 inhabitants per square mile (136.5/km2). There were 90,136 housing units at an average density of 136.5 per square mile (52.7/km2). [18] The racial makeup of the county was 81.5% white, 8.6% black or African American, 3.8% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 2.9% from other races, and 2.8% from two or more races. The total (all races) of those self-identifying as Hispanic or Latino origin made up 7.3%, and those persons who were white alone made up 77.8% of the population. [17] In terms of ancestry, 26.3% were German, 17.4% were Irish, 12.1% were English, 7.2% were Italian, and 6.3% were American. [19]

Of the 84,800 households, 37.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.8% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 27.8% were non-families, and 22.0% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.17. The median age was 38.6 years. [17]

The median income for a household in the county was $81,686 and the median income for a family was $95,036. Males had a median income of $62,494 versus $46,720 for females. The per capita income for the county was $35,172. About 3.2% of families and 4.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.8% of those under age 18 and 5.6% of those age 65 or over. [20]

2014

The United States Census Bureau estimates Frederick County's population at 245,322, marking a 5.1% increase since 2010. [3] The racial makeup was estimated to be the following in 2014: 75% White (67.0% Non-Hispanic White), 9.7% Black, 4.6% Asian, 0.5% Native American, 0.1% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.8% Two or more races, and 8.7% were Hispanic or Latino, of any race. [3]

Law, government, and politics

Charter government

Effective December 1, 2014, Frederick County transitioned to a "charter home rule government". [21] The voters approved this governmental change on November 6, 2012 election with 62,469 voting for the transition and 37,368 voting against. [22]

Previously, Frederick County had been governed by a five-member county commission that could only legislate in local matters with the prior consent of the Maryland General Assembly. Even that authority was limited to areas authorized by the General Assembly, enabling legislation, or public local laws. As a charter county, Frederick County is now governed by a seven-member county council, with five elected from districts and two elected at-large. A popularly elected county executive is responsible for providing direction, supervision, and administrative oversight of all executive departments, agencies, and offices. The council has broad power to act on most local matters. [22]

Jan H. Gardner was elected the first Frederick County Executive in 2014. [23] Gardner was reelected in 2018. [24]

County Executive
 NameAffiliationTerm
 Jan H. Gardner Democrat 2014—

The members of the second Frederick County Council for the term beginning 2018 are: [25] [26]

County Council
 NameAffiliationDistrictRegionFirst elected
  Kai Hagen Democrat At-largeAt-large2018
  Phil Dacey Republican At-largeAt-large2018
 Jerry Donald [27] Democrat 1 Braddock Heights, Middletown, Brunswick 2014
 Steve McKay Republican 2 Monrovia, Urbana, New Market, Mount Airy 2018
 M.C. Keegan-Ayer Democrat 3 Frederick, Clover Hill 2014
 Jessica Fitzwater Democrat 4 Frederick, Ballenger Creek, Linganore 2014
 Michael Blue Republican 5 Myersville, Emmitsburg, Thurmont 2018

The Frederick County State's Attorney, elected November 2, 2010, is Republican Charlie Smith. Smith was reelected in 2018. [25]

The sheriff of Frederick County is Republican Chuck Jenkins. [25]

The Executive Director for the Frederick County Office of Economic Development is Helen Propheter. The Office of Economic Development is located at 118 North Market Street, Suite 300, Frederick, MD 21701.

Frederick County's fire and rescue service is handled by a combination career and volunteer service delivery system. Frederick County employs over 450 career firefighters. Volunteers of the 26 volunteer fire and rescue corporations number approximately 300 active operational members. Fire, Rescue, and Emergency Medical Services, including Advanced Life Support are handled by career staffing supplemented by volunteers. Frederick County has a Maryland State Police Medevac located at the Frederick Municipal Airport and is designated "Trooper 3". Trooper 3 handles calls all throughout the state, but provides immediate assistance to local police, fire and rescue services.

Politics

Historically a strong Republican county, Frederick County has trended toward the Democratic Party in recent elections. No Democratic presidential candidate had carried Frederick County since Lyndon Johnson's 1964 landslide until Joe Biden won the county in 2020, although it just narrowly voted for Republicans John McCain in 2008, Mitt Romney in 2012, and Donald Trump in 2016. McCain edged out Barack Obama by only 1,157 votes out of over one hundred thousand cast in the 2008 election.

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment of Frederick County [28]
PartyTotalPercentage
Democratic 71,36438.66%
Republican 68,45937.09%
Independents, unaffiliated, and other44,77524.25%
Total184,598100.00%
Presidential election results
Presidential election results [29]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 43.7% 63,68253.3%77,6752.9% 4,258
2016 47.4%59,52245.0% 56,5227.7% 9,633
2012 50.2%58,79847.1% 55,1462.7% 3,171
2008 49.6%55,17048.6% 54,0131.8% 2,003
2004 59.6%59,93439.3% 39,5031.2% 1,157
2000 57.7%45,35039.1% 30,7253.3% 2,586
1996 52.8%34,49438.4% 25,0818.8% 5,728
1992 48.4%31,29033.8% 21,84817.9% 11,553
1988 65.3%32,57534.2% 17,0610.5% 231
1984 68.7%29,60631.1% 13,4110.2% 96
1980 56.3%22,03334.8% 13,6298.9% 3,468
1976 55.2%17,94144.8% 14,542
1972 69.5%19,90728.7% 8,2351.8% 509
1968 51.9%13,64931.6% 8,31616.5% 4,348
1964 38.9% 9,26461.1%14,548
1960 57.5%13,40842.5% 9,9100.0% 1
1956 65.4%14,38734.6% 7,619
1952 64.9%14,56235.0% 7,8510.2% 38
1948 57.8%9,93441.5% 7,1420.7% 121
1944 57.1%11,36742.9% 8,528
1940 48.0% 10,48551.6%11,2550.4% 93
1936 46.8% 9,50052.9%10,7220.3% 64
1932 39.6% 7,14459.3%10,6861.1% 194
1928 62.6%12,56936.9% 7,4060.6% 114
1924 49.4%8,44145.3% 7,7405.4% 925
1920 54.6%9,55944.2% 7,7471.2% 212
1916 47.6% 5,72550.7%6,0941.7% 207
1912 24.8% 2,81348.8%5,54526.4% 3,002
1908 52.7%5,96645.6% 5,1581.7% 192
1904 52.8%5,78845.7% 5,0041.5% 164
1900 51.3%6,39146.7% 5,8202.0% 246
1896 53.2%6,35243.6% 5,2143.1% 374
1892 48.1% 5,50249.3%5,6432.5% 289

In state-level elections, Republicans in Frederick rebounded to more historical levels in the 2010 Maryland Gubernatorial & Senatorial Elections, giving the Republican Ehrlich/Kane ticket 55% to Democrat O'Malley/Brown's 45. Frederick voters also supported Republican Senate challenger Eric Wargotz over incumbent Democratic Senator Barbara Mikulski by a margin of 51–46, even as Mikulski was winning statewide by a landslide 61–37. Despite its conservative reputation, Frederick County voted in favor of Maryland Question 6, which legalized same-sex marriage in Maryland. In the 2014 Maryland Gubernatorial race Republican Larry Hogan won Frederick County strongly with 63 percent of the vote compared to Democrat Anthony Brown's 35 percent. [30] In the 2018 elections, despite increased support for Hogan, the Democrats experienced significant gains, securing a majority on the County Council and winning District 3B in the House of Delegates. [31] [32] [33] The election also saw incumbent U.S. Senator Ben Cardin win Frederick County with 51.7% of the vote. [34]

Public safety

The Frederick County Sheriff's Office provides court protection, jail management, and morgue operation for the entire county. It provides police patrol and detective services within the unincorporated areas of Frederick County. The entire county entails a population of 222,938 residents within 662.88 square miles (1,717 km2). Frederick City, Brunswick, Mt.Airy, Emmitsburg, and Thurmont have municipal police departments. Middletown contracts with the Sheriff's Office for its policing. [35]

Crime

The following table includes the number of incidents reported for each type of offense from 2012-2019. [36]

YearHomicideForcible sex offenseAssaultRobberyBurglaryTheftMotor vehicle theftFraudArson
201207145915319854111
2013Increase Negative.svg4Decrease Positive.svg50Decrease Positive.svg36Increase Negative.svg23Decrease Positive.svg139Decrease Positive.svg85Increase Negative.svg10Increase Negative.svg46Increase Negative.svg17
2014Decrease Positive.svg0Increase Negative.svg61Decrease Positive.svg30Steady2.svg23Increase Negative.svg169Increase Negative.svg161Decrease Positive.svg3Decrease Positive.svg42Decrease Positive.svg9
2015Increase Negative.svg4Decrease Positive.svg56Increase Negative.svg32Steady2.svg23Decrease Positive.svg150Decrease Positive.svg124Increase Negative.svg4Increase Negative.svg47Increase Negative.svg10
2016Decrease Positive.svg1Decrease Positive.svg53Decrease Positive.svg31Increase Negative.svg26Decrease Positive.svg134Increase Negative.svg142Increase Negative.svg12Increase Negative.svg62Decrease Positive.svg4
2017Increase Negative.svg3Increase Negative.svg64Increase Negative.svg35Decrease Positive.svg24Steady2.svg134Increase Negative.svg145Increase Negative.svg18Decrease Positive.svg57Increase Negative.svg8
2018Decrease Positive.svg1Decrease Positive.svg52Decrease Positive.svg33Decrease Positive.svg16Decrease Positive.svg103Increase Negative.svg158Decrease Positive.svg7Increase Negative.svg85Decrease Positive.svg4
2019Steady2.svg1Increase Negative.svg56Increase Negative.svg45Increase Negative.svg17Decrease Positive.svg97Decrease Positive.svg147Increase Negative.svg18Decrease Positive.svg77Increase Negative.svg9

Economy

The United States Census Bureau has reported the following data for Frederick County. [37]

MetricFrederick CountyMaryland
Per capita money income in past 12 months (2013 dollars), 2009-2013$36,917$36,354
Median household income, 2009-2013$84,570$73,538
Persons below poverty level, percent, 2009-20136.1%9.8%
Private nonfarm establishments, 20135,955135,4211
Private nonfarm employment, 201383,7992,182,2601
Private nonfarm employment, percent change, 2012-20131.1%1.4%
Nonemployer establishments, 201216,843442,314
Total number of firms, 200721,430528,112
Black-owned firms, percent5.9%19.3%
Asian-owned firms, percent3.3%6.8%
Hispanic-owned firms, percent, 20073.6%4.9%
Women-owned firms31.1%32.6%
Manufacturers shipments, 2007 ($1000)3,003,69641,456,097
Merchant wholesaler sales, 2007 ($1000)1,252,14251,276,797
Retail sales, 2007 ($1000)3,066,28175,664,186
Retail sales per capita, 2007$13,629$13,429
Accommodation and food services sales, 2007 ($1000)356,48210,758,428
Building permits, 20131,22017,918

According to the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development, the following are the principal employers in Frederick County. This list excludes U.S. post offices and state and local governments, but includes public institutions of higher education. [38]

EmployerEmployees
(Nov. 2014) [38]
Fort Detrick
(including Frederick National Laboratory
for Cancer Research)
4,600
Frederick Memorial Healthcare System2,696
Wells Fargo Home Mortgage 1,881
Leidos Biomedical Research 1,836
Bechtel 1,578
Frederick Community College 1,055
State Farm Insurance 900
Walmart/Sam's Club 700
AstraZeneca 595
Lonza Walkersville520
Hood College 519
Mount St. Mary's University 511
UnitedHealthcare 500
McDonald's 499
Giant Food 490
Way Station480
Costco Wholesale 452
Life Technologies 450
NVR 450
Wegmans Food Markets 445
Home Depot 444
Plamondon Companies400
Stulz Air Technology Systems375
Weis Markets 363
RR Donnelley 359
YMCA of Frederick County350
Canam Steel333
Giant Eagle 330
Homewood Retirement Centers300
Toys "R" Us 260
Trans-Tech260

Frederick County leads Maryland in milk production; the county's dairy herds account for one-third of the state's total. [39] However, the dairy market is unstable, and the Frederick County, like the state more broadly, has lost dairy farms. [40]

Communities

Map of urban areas in Frederick County Fred ua.png
Map of urban areas in Frederick County
Brunswick Downtown Brunswick 009.jpg
Brunswick
Burkittsville Burkittsville street.JPG
Burkittsville
Emmitsburg Emmitsburg Pano.jpg
Emmitsburg
Frederick, the county seat and largest community in Frederick County. 2008 03 28 - Frederick - City Hall 2.jpg
Frederick, the county seat and largest community in Frederick County.
Middletown Middletown, Maryland Main Street.jpg
Middletown

Cities

Towns

Village

Census-designated places

The Census Bureau recognizes the following census-designated places in the county:

Unincorporated communities

Notable people

See also

Notes

  1. "Frederick County Council". frederickcountymd.gov. Retrieved May 3, 2021.
  2. "2018 Frederick County Election Results". elections.maryland.gov. Retrieved May 3, 2021.
  3. 1 2 3 4 "Frederick County QuickFacts". U.S. Census Bureau. 2010. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved August 1, 2011.
  4. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  5. 1 2 "Population Change in Suburban Maryland" (PDF). George Mason University. Retrieved February 16, 2014.
  6. 1 2 "Metropolitan sprawl puts urban in suburban". 2012. Retrieved February 16, 2014.
  7. "Frederick County, Maryland – Government". Maryland State Archives. March 5, 2008. Retrieved August 16, 2008.
  8. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. April 15, 2008.
  9. "Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV". U.S. Census Bureau. U.S. Department of Commerce. Retrieved April 12, 2017.
  10. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 13, 2014. Retrieved September 12, 2014.
  11. "Frederick News-Post Local Section". The Frederick News-Post. Archived from the original on March 16, 2007. Retrieved March 16, 2007.
  12. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved April 26, 2019.
  13. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 12, 2014.
  14. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved September 12, 2014.
  15. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 12, 2014.
  16. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 12, 2014.
  17. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 22, 2016.
  18. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 22, 2016.
  19. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 22, 2016.
  20. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 22, 2016.
  21. "Charter Government Transition". Frederick County, MD Government. Archived from the original on March 7, 2014. Retrieved March 7, 2014.
  22. 1 2 Depies, Lori (March 18, 2013). "Charter Government and Transition: What it means to you and to Frederick County" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on March 7, 2014. Retrieved March 7, 2014.
  23. McManus, Kevin (November 5, 2014). "Gardner Elected Frederick County's First Executive". WFMD-AM. Frederick, Maryland: Aloha Station Trust, LLC. Archived from the original on November 8, 2014.
  24. "2018 county election results in Maryland". WTOP. November 7, 2018.
  25. 1 2 3 "Election Summary Report Gubernatorial General Election, Frederick County, Maryland, November 4, 2014: Summary For Jurisdiction Wide, All Counters, All Races, Unofficial Results, Early Voting, Polling Place, and Absentee 1 Canvass" (PDF). Frederick County Board of Elections. November 6, 2014. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 8, 2014.
  26. "2014 Council Districts" (PDF). Frederick County Board of Elections. November 19, 2013. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 5, 2014.
  27. Rodgers, Bethany (November 15, 2014). "Donald takes County Council seat by 25 votes". Frederick News-Post. Retrieved November 15, 2014.
  28. "Summary of Voter Activity Report" (PDF). Maryland State Board of Elections. August 2020. Retrieved October 4, 2020.
  29. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved June 11, 2018.
  30. http://www.frederickcountymd.gov/DocumentCenter/View/277460
  31. "2018 Maryland Election Results: Governor's race, statewide offices". WTOP. November 6, 2018. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  32. "2018 county election results in Maryland". WTOP. November 7, 2018. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  33. "2018 Maryland House of Delegates Election Results". WTOP. November 6, 2018. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  34. "Maryland Election Results 2018: Live Midterm Map by County & Analysis". www.politico.com. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  35. Frederick County Sheriff office website
  36. "2019 Frederick County Sheriff's Office Annual Report". WTOP. November 6, 2018. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  37. State & County QuickFacts, Frederick County Archived June 6, 2011, at the Wayback Machine , Maryland, United States Census Bureau.
  38. 1 2 Major Employers in Frederick County, Maryland, Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development.
  39. Maryland at a Glance: Agriculture, Maryland Manual (April 2015).
  40. Associated Press, Frederick County Dairy Farm Closes Its Doors (October 1, 2012).

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Wicomico County is located in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Maryland, on the Delmarva Peninsula. As of the 2010 census, the population was 98,733. The county seat is Salisbury. The county was named for the Wicomico River, which in turn derives from Algonquian language words wicko mekee, meaning "a place where houses are built," apparently referring to a Native American town on the banks.

Piscataquis County, Maine County in Maine, US

Piscataquis County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maine. As of the 2010 census, its population was 17,535, making it Maine's least-populous county. Its county seat is Dover-Foxcroft. The county was incorporated on 23 March 1838, taken from the western part of Penobscot County and the eastern part of Somerset County, and is named for an Abenaki word meaning "branch of the river" or "at the river branch."

Mount Airy, Maryland Town in Maryland

Mount Airy is a town in Carroll and Frederick counties in the U.S. state of Maryland. It is part of both the Washington Metropolitan Area and Baltimore Metropolitan Area. As of the 2010 census the population was 9,288.

Linganore, Maryland Census-designated place in Maryland

Linganore is a census-designated place (CDP) in Frederick County, in the U.S. state of Maryland. It consists of the area around Lake Linganore, a residential community governed by a homeowners association, located east of the city of Frederick. As of the 2010 census the CDP had a population of 8,543. Prior to 2010, the area was part of the Linganore-Bartonsville CDP. The mailing address for the area is Lake Linganore, with a ZIP code of 21774.

Bartonsville, Maryland Census-designated place in Maryland, United States

Bartonsville is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Frederick County, in the U.S. state of Maryland. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 1,451. Prior to 2010, the area was part of the Linganore-Bartonsville CDP.

Washington metropolitan area Metropolitan area in the United States

The Washington metropolitan area is the metropolitan area centered on Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. The area includes all of the federal district and parts of the U.S. states of Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia. It is part of the larger Baltimore–Washington metropolitan area.

Monrovia, Maryland Census-designated place in Maryland

Monrovia is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Frederick County, in the U.S. state of Maryland. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 416. The ZIP code for the area is 21770.

Linganore Creek

Linganore Creek is a 13.5-mile-long (21.7 km) tributary of the Monocacy River in Frederick County, Maryland. The stream is formed from the confluence of the north and south forks of the Linganore, about 10 miles (16 km) east-northeast of the city of Frederick. The creek runs roughly southwest to the Monocacy River, which drains to the Potomac River. The watershed area of the creek is 83.1 square miles (215 km2). High water in the creek can result in flooding of Gas House Pike, an east-west road running between Monocacy Boulevard and Green Valley Road.

Spring Ridge, Maryland Census-designated place in Maryland

Spring Ridge is census-designated place (CDP) and suburban housing community in Frederick County, in the U.S. state of Maryland, just outside the city of Frederick. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 5,795. Before 2010, it was part of the Linganore-Bartonsville, Maryland census-designated place, which was split into three for the 2010 census.

References

Coordinates: 39°28′N77°24′W / 39.47°N 77.40°W / 39.47; -77.40