Fulton County, Pennsylvania

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Fulton County, Pennsylvania
County
Fulton County
Courthouse-600px.jpg
The Fulton County Courthouse
County Seal 600 dpi transparent shadow 2.png
Seal
Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Fulton County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Pennsylvania
Map of USA PA.svg
Pennsylvania's location within the U.S.
FoundedApril 19, 1850
Named for Robert Fulton
Seat McConnellsburg
Largest boroughMcConnellsburg
Area
  Total438 sq mi (1,134 km2)
  Land438 sq mi (1,134 km2)
  Water0.5 sq mi (1 km2), 0.1%
Population (est.)
  (2018)14,523
  Density33/sq mi (13/km2)
Congressional district 13th
Time zone Eastern: UTC−5/−4
Website www.co.fulton.pa.us

Fulton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,845, [1] making it the fourth-least populous county in Pennsylvania. Its county seat is McConnellsburg. [2] The county was created on April 19, 1850, [3] from part of Bedford County and named for inventor Robert Fulton. [4]

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, a county is an administrative or political subdivision of a state that consists of a geographic region with specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs, respectively.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Pennsylvania State of the United States of America

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern, Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware to the southeast, Maryland to the south, West Virginia to the southwest, Ohio to the west, Lake Erie and the Canadian province of Ontario to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey to the east.

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 438 square miles (1,130 km2), of which 438 square miles (1,130 km2) is land and 0.5 square miles (1.3 km2) (0.1%) is water. [5] It is in the watershed of the Chesapeake Bay and, although most of the county is drained by the Potomac River, some northern and northeastern areas are drained by the Juniata River into the Susquehanna River.

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Chesapeake Bay An estuary in the U.S. states of Maryland and Virginia

The Chesapeake Bay is an estuary in the U.S. states of Maryland and Virginia. The Bay is located in the Mid-Atlantic region and is primarily separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the Delmarva Peninsula with its mouth located between Cape Henry and Cape Charles. With its northern portion in Maryland and the southern part in Virginia, the Chesapeake Bay is a very important feature for the ecology and economy of those two states, as well as others. More than 150 major rivers and streams flow into the Bay's 64,299-square-mile (166,534 km2) drainage basin, which covers parts of six states and all of Washington, D.C.

Potomac River river in the mid-Atlantic United States

The Potomac River is found within the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States and flows from the Potomac Highlands into the Chesapeake Bay. The river is approximately 405 miles (652 km) long, with a drainage area of about 14,700 square miles (38,000 km2). In terms of area, this makes the Potomac River the fourth largest river along the Atlantic coast of the United States and the 21st largest in the United States. Over 5 million people live within the Potomac watershed.

Adjacent counties

Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania County in the United States

Huntingdon County is a county located in the center of the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 45,913. Its county seat is Huntingdon. The county was created on September 20, 1787, mainly from the north part of Bedford County, plus an addition of territory on the east from Cumberland County.

Franklin County, Pennsylvania County in the United States

Franklin County is a county located in South Central Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 149,618. Its county seat is Chambersburg.

Washington County, Maryland County in the United States

Washington County is located in the western part of the U.S. state of Maryland. As of the 2010 census, the population was 147,430. Its county seat is Hagerstown. Washington County was the first county in the United States to be named for the Revolutionary War general George Washington. Washington County is one of three Maryland counties recognized by the Appalachian Regional Commission as being part of Appalachia.

Geology

Fulton County is situated within the Ridge and Valley physiographic province, which is characterized by folded and faulted sedimentary rocks of early to middle Paleozoic age. [6]

Ridge-and-Valley Appalachians Physiographic province of the larger Appalachian division

The Ridge-and-Valley Appalachians, also called the Ridge and Valley Province or the Valley and Ridge Appalachians, are a physiographic province of the larger Appalachian division and are also a belt within the Appalachian Mountains extending from southeastern New York through northwestern New Jersey, westward into Pennsylvania and southward into Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama. They form a broad arc between the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Appalachian Plateau physiographic province. They are characterized by long, even ridges, with long, continuous valleys in between.

United States physiographic region classification system for landforms of the lower 48 United States by N. M. Fenneman

This list of physiographic regions of the contiguous United States identifies the 8 regions, 25 provinces, and 85 sections. The system dates to Nevin Fenneman's paper Physiographic Subdivision of the United States, published in 1917. Fenneman expanded and presented his system more fully in two books, Physiography of western United States (1931), and Physiography of eastern United States (1938). In these works Fenneman described 25 provinces and 85 sections of the United States physiography.

Fold (geology) fold in geology

In structural geology, folds occur when one or a stack of originally flat and planar surfaces, such as sedimentary strata, are bent or curved as a result of permanent deformation. Synsedimentary folds are those due to slumping of sedimentary material before it is lithified. Folds in rocks vary in size from microscopic crinkles to mountain-sized folds. They occur singly as isolated folds and in extensive fold trains of different sizes, on a variety of scales.

The stratigraphic record of sedimentary rocks within the county spans from the Cambrian Shadygrove Formation outcropping just south of McConnelsburg to the Pennsylvanian Allegheny Group at the northernmost tip of the county. No igneous or metamorphic rocks of any kind exist within Fulton county.

Stratigraphy The study of rock layers and their formation

Stratigraphy is a branch of geology concerned with the study of rock layers (strata) and layering (stratification). It is primarily used in the study of sedimentary and layered volcanic rocks. Stratigraphy has two related subfields: lithostratigraphy and biostratigraphy.

The Cambrian Period was the first geological period of the Paleozoic Era, and of the Phanerozoic Eon. The Cambrian lasted 55.6 million years from the end of the preceding Ediacaran Period 541 million years ago (mya) to the beginning of the Ordovician Period 485.4 mya. Its subdivisions, and its base, are somewhat in flux. The period was established by Adam Sedgwick, who named it after Cambria, the Latin name of Wales, where Britain's Cambrian rocks are best exposed. The Cambrian is unique in its unusually high proportion of lagerstätte sedimentary deposits, sites of exceptional preservation where "soft" parts of organisms are preserved as well as their more resistant shells. As a result, our understanding of the Cambrian biology surpasses that of some later periods.

The Pennsylvanian is, in the ICS geologic timescale, the younger of two subperiods of the Carboniferous Period. It lasted from roughly 323.2 million years ago to 298.9 million years ago Ma. As with most other geochronologic units, the rock beds that define the Pennsylvanian are well identified, but the exact date of the start and end are uncertain by a few hundred thousand years. The Pennsylvanian is named after the U.S. state of Pennsylvania, where the coal-productive beds of this age are widespread.

Mountain ridges within Fulton County include Rays Hill (along the western border with Bedford County), Town Hill, Sideling Hill, Scrub Ridge, and Meadow Grounds Mountain, and all these are held up by the Mississippian Pocono Formation, made of quartz sandstone and conglomerate. Rays Hill and Town Hill form a syncline, as do Scrub Ridge and Meadow Grounds Mountain, and Sideling Hill itself is a syncline. Dickeys Mountain and Tuscarora Mountain (along the eastern border with Franklin County) also form a syncline, but these ridges are held up by the Tuscarora Formation. Broad Top, located in the northeast corner of the county, is a plateau of relatively flat-lying rocks that are stratigraphically higher, and thus younger (Mississippian and Pennsylvanian), than most of the other rocks within the county. Broad Top extends into Huntingdon County to the north and Bedford County to the west.

Rays Hill mountain in United States of America

Rays Hill is a mountain ridge in Pennsylvania's Ridge and Valley Appalachians region. It is bordered to the east by Sideling Hill. About halfway along its run, the west side of Rays Hill ties into Broad Top Mountain, a large plateau. On its west it is bordered by Tussey Mountain south of Broad Top Mountain and Rocky Ridge north of Broad Top Mountain.

Town Hill is a mountain range located in Allegany County, Maryland and Bedford and Fulton Counties in Pennsylvania. Its southern end is 2.25 miles northwest of Kiefer in Allegany County. It trends northeasterly, and ends about 1.5 miles south of the town of Emmaville in Fulton County. Its highest elevation is 2000 feet.

Sideling Hill mountain in United States of America

Sideling Hill is a long, steep, narrow mountain ridge in the Ridge-and-Valley physiographic province of the Appalachian Mountains, located in Washington County in western Maryland and adjacent West Virginia and Pennsylvania, USA. The highest point on the ridge is Fisher Point, at 2,310 feet (700 m) in Fulton County, Pennsylvania.

All of Fulton County lies far to the south of the glacial boundary, and thus it was never glaciated. [7] However, during the Pleistocene epoch, or "Ice Age," periglacial (meaning "around glacier" or simply "cold") processes dominated. Most of the county was most likely a tundra during the Pleistocene.

The Broad Top Coal Field is located in Wells Township in the northwestern corner of the county. [8] The field contains bituminous coal. There are a few abandoned mines in the area, although acid mine drainage is not as much of an environmental problem in Fulton County as it is in adjacent Bedford and Huntingdon Counties.

Interesting geologic features within Fulton County include some of the following:

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1850 7,567
1860 9,13120.7%
1870 9,3602.5%
1880 10,1498.4%
1890 10,137−0.1%
1900 9,924−2.1%
1910 9,703−2.2%
1920 9,617−0.9%
1930 9,231−4.0%
1940 10,67315.6%
1950 10,387−2.7%
1960 10,5972.0%
1970 10,7761.7%
1980 12,84219.2%
1990 13,8377.7%
2000 14,2613.1%
2010 14,8454.1%
Est. 201814,523 [9] −2.2%
U.S. Decennial Census [10]
1790-1960 [11] 1900-1990 [12]
1990-2000 [13] 2010-2017 [1]

As of the census [14] of 2000, there were 14,261 people, 5,660 households, and 4,097 families residing in the county. The population density was 33 people per square mile (13/km²). There were 6,790 housing units at an average density of 16 per square mile (6/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.25% White, 0.66% Black or African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.04% from other races, and 0.72% from two or more races. 0.36% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 40.8% were of German, 20.4% American, 8.3% Irish and 6.9% English ancestry.

There were 5,660 households out of which 31.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.50% were married couples living together, 8.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.60% were non-families. 24.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the county, the population was spread out with 24.60% under the age of 18, 7.60% from 18 to 24, 28.40% from 25 to 44, 25.00% from 45 to 64, and 14.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 100.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.60 males.

Almost everyone who lives in Fulton County speaks English as their first language. The dominant form of speech in Fulton County is the Central Pennsylvania accent.

Politics

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [15]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 83.5%5,69413.4% 9123.2% 216
2012 77.4%4,81421.1% 1,3101.6% 97
2008 73.6%4,64225.0% 1,5761.4% 88
2004 76.1%4,77223.5% 1,4750.4% 24
2000 71.0%3,75327.0% 1,4252.0% 107
1996 54.8%2,66533.3% 1,62012.0% 583
1992 50.9%2,55831.6% 1,58817.5% 877
1988 66.4%3,08633.0% 1,5320.6% 28
1984 71.1%3,25428.6% 1,3090.2% 11
1980 64.9%2,74031.8% 1,3423.3% 140
1976 54.8%2,21942.9% 1,7372.4% 96
1972 66.2%2,51531.4% 1,1922.4% 90
1968 55.4%2,20029.6% 1,17415.1% 599
1964 44.4% 1,74755.4%2,1800.3% 10
1960 61.6%2,69838.2% 1,6720.2% 9
1956 56.5%2,37043.4% 1,8190.1% 6
1952 55.1%2,12744.5% 1,7180.4% 14
1948 50.7%1,76048.5% 1,6840.9% 31
1944 54.0%2,08445.6% 1,7580.4% 15
1940 51.5%2,10848.4% 1,9820.2% 6
1936 46.0% 2,08553.7%2,4310.3% 15
1932 41.8% 1,41057.0%1,9211.2% 40
1928 66.8%2,17932.3% 1,0540.9% 28
1924 47.6% 1,16049.6%1,2072.8% 68
1920 50.2%1,29247.8% 1,2312.0% 51
1916 39.6% 80259.2%1,1991.1% 23
1912 15.3% 31752.3%1,08032.4% 670
1908 45.5% 97451.2%1,0983.3% 71
1904 48.5% 1,10050.1%1,1371.4% 32
1900 45.3% 1,03953.3%1,2241.4% 32
1896 45.8% 1,08352.7%1,2461.4% 34
1892 42.7% 91856.3%1,2100.9% 20
1888 42.9% 95155.5%1,2301.5% 34

Fulton County has displayed strong tendencies to vote for Republican candidates in past elections. In the 2004 U.S. Presidential election, George W. Bush carried the county by a massive 52.6% margin over John Kerry, making it Bush's strongest county in the slightly Democratic state, which Kerry won by a 2.5% margin over Bush. Furthermore, in 2008, John McCain carried Fulton by a 48.6% margin over Barack Obama, McCain's best showing in the Keystone State, which Obama won by a 10.3% margin over McCain. [15] The county voted for Donald Trump in 2016 by a 70.8% margin, the highest in the state. The county has voted for the Republican in every presidential election since 1964. In 2006, Rick Santorum and Lynn Swann received more than 60% of the Fulton County vote despite their defeats statewide. In the 2012 U.S. Presidential election, Fulton County was the only county in Pennsylvania where Barack Obama won less than 20% of the white vote. [16]

Law and government

State Senate [17]

State House of Representatives [17]

United States House of Representatives

United States Senate

Education

Map of Fulton County, Pennsylvania Public School Districts Map of Fulton County Pennsylvania School Districts.png
Map of Fulton County, Pennsylvania Public School Districts

Public school districts

Transportation

Major Highways

Other

Fulton County is one of only two counties in Pennsylvania with no known active railroad lines of any kind, the other being Sullivan County. [18]

Communities

Map of Fulton County, Pennsylvania with Municipal Labels showing Boroughs (red) and Townships (white). Map of Fulton County Pennsylvania With Municipal and Township Labels.png
Map of Fulton County, Pennsylvania with Municipal Labels showing Boroughs (red) and Townships (white).

Under Pennsylvania law, there are four types of incorporated municipalities: cities, boroughs, townships, and, in at most two cases, towns. The following boroughs and townships are located in Fulton County:

Boroughs

Townships

Census-designated places

Population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Fulton County. [19]

county seat

RankCity/Town/etc.Municipal typePopulation (2010 Census)

1 McConnellsburg Borough1,220
2 Needmore CDP170
3 Valley-Hi Borough15

See also

Related Research Articles

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Sullivan County, Pennsylvania County in the United States

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Somerset County, Pennsylvania County in the United States

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Cameron County, Pennsylvania County in the United States

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McConnellsburg, Pennsylvania Borough in Pennsylvania, United States

McConnellsburg is a borough in Fulton County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 1,220 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Fulton County.

U.S. Route 522 is a spur route of US 22 in the U.S. states of Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. The U.S. Highway runs 308.59 miles (496.63 km) from US 60 near Powhatan, Virginia, north to US 11 and US 15 near Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania. US 522 serves many small cities and towns in the Piedmont, Blue Ridge Mountains, and northern Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. The highway serves the Virginia communities of Goochland, Mineral, Culpeper, the town of Washington, and Front Royal and the independent city of Winchester. US 522 then follows the Ridge-and-Valley Appalachians north and then east through the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia, a 2-mile-wide (3.2 km) stretch of Western Maryland, and South Central Pennsylvania to its terminus in the Susquehanna Valley. The highway serves Berkeley Springs, West Virginia; Hancock, Maryland; and the communities of McConnellsburg, Mount Union, Lewistown, and Middleburg in Pennsylvania.

Pennsylvania Route 26 highway in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Route 26 is a 125 12-mile (202.0 km) highway in the south-central area of Pennsylvania. Its northern terminus is at Pennsylvania Route 150 northwest of Howard, Pennsylvania; its southern terminus is at the Maryland state line near Barnes Gap in Union Township. Two major destinations along this route are Raystown Lake near Huntingdon and the Pennsylvania State University at State College.

Pennsylvania Route 16 highway in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Route 16 is a 43-mile-long (69 km) east–west state route located in southern Pennsylvania, United States. The western terminus of the route is at U.S. Route 522 in McConnellsburg. The eastern terminus is at the Mason–Dixon line in Liberty Township, where the road continues into Maryland as Maryland Route 140. PA 16 is a two-lane road that runs through rural areas in Fulton, Franklin, and Adams counties. The route heads east from McConnellsburg and crosses Tuscarora Mountain into Franklin County, where it continues east into the agricultural Cumberland Valley. Here, the passes through Mercersburg, Greencastle, and Waynesboro. PA 16 heads east through the South Mountain range, where it heads into Adams County and passes through Carroll Valley before coming to the Maryland border. PA 16 intersects several roads including PA 456 in Cove Gap, PA 75 and PA 416 in Mercersburg, PA 995 in Upton, US 11 and Interstate 81 (I-81) in Greencastle, PA 316 and PA 997 in Waynesboro, and PA 116 in Carroll Valley. The road's main name is Buchanan Trail in honor of former President James Buchanan, who was born near the road in Cove Gap.

Laurel Mountain State Park State park in Pennsylvania, United States

Laurel Mountain State Park is a 493-acre (200 ha) Pennsylvania state park in Ligonier Township, Westmoreland County and Jenner Township, Somerset County, Pennsylvania in the United States.

Pennsylvania Route 484 highway in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Route 484 is a 14.5-mile-long (23.3 km) state highway located in Fulton County in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The western terminus is at Pennsylvania Route 26 in Union Township. The eastern terminus is at Pennsylvania Route 655 near Warfordsburg.

Pennsylvania Route 643 highway in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Route 643 is a 7.3-mile-long (11.7 km) state highway located in Fulton County, Pennsylvania. The eastern terminus is at US 522 in Bethel Township. The western terminus is at I 70 in Brush Creek Township.

Pennsylvania Route 829 highway in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Route 829 is a 17.04-mile-long (27.42 km) state highway located in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. The southern terminus is at Route 655 in Cass Township. The northern terminus is at U.S. Route 22 in Mill Creek.

Pennsylvania Route 913 highway in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Route 913 is a 17.7-mile-long (28.5 km) state highway located in Bedford, Huntingdon and Fulton Counties in Pennsylvania. The western terminus is at PA 26 in Saxton. The eastern terminus is at PA 655 in Taylor Township.

Pennsylvania Route 915 highway in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Route 915 is a 22-mile-long (35 km) state highway located in Fulton and Bedford Counties in Pennsylvania. The southern terminus is at I 70 in Brush Creek Township. The northern terminus is at PA 26 in Hopewell.

Broad Top

Broad Top is a plateau located in south-central Pennsylvania. It extends into Huntingdon County to the north, Fulton County to the southeast, and Bedford County to the southwest. It is bounded to the west by Saxton Mountain and Terrace Mountain, and to the east by Sideling Hill. In Bedford County, Harbor Mountain forms the southern boundary. Trough Creek Valley lies between the mountains.

Needmore, Pennsylvania Census-designated place in Pennsylvania, United States

Needmore is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Fulton County, Pennsylvania, United States. As of the 2010 census the population was 170. Needmore was created on April 27, 1954.

References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 10, 2011. Retrieved November 17, 2013.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. Fulton County, Pennsylvania Chamber of Commerce and Tourism Website Archived 2011-07-05 at the Wayback Machine
  4. Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 133.
  5. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 7, 2015.
  6. "Geology, Map 13". www.dcnr.state.pa.us. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  7. "Geology, Map 59" (PDF). www.dcnr.state.pa.us. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  8. "Geology, Map 11" (PDF). www.dcnr.state.pa.us. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  9. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved October 14, 2018.
  10. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved March 7, 2015.
  11. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved March 7, 2015.
  12. Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 24, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 7, 2015.
  13. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved March 7, 2015.
  14. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  15. 1 2 Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  16. Cohn, Nate (23 April 2014). "Southern Whites' Loyalty to G.O.P. Nearing That of Blacks to Democrats (Map)". The New York Times . Retrieved 27 April 2014.
  17. 1 2 Center, Legislativate Data Processing. "Find Your Legislator". The official website for the Pennsylvania General Assembly. Retrieved 2017-05-11.
  18. "Penndot Railroad Map January 2015" (PDF). penndot.gov. Retrieved 5 December 2016.
  19. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on December 21, 2013. Retrieved February 10, 2013.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)

Coordinates: 39°55′N78°07′W / 39.92°N 78.11°W / 39.92; -78.11