Northampton County, Pennsylvania

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Northampton County
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Northampton County, Pennsylvania seal.png
Seal
Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Northampton County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania in United States.svg
Pennsylvania's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 40°45′N75°19′W / 40.75°N 75.31°W / 40.75; -75.31
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Pennsylvania.svg  Pennsylvania
FoundedMarch 11, 1752
Named for Northamptonshire
Seat Easton
Largest city Bethlehem
Area
  Total377 sq mi (980 km2)
  Land370 sq mi (1,000 km2)
  Water7.7 sq mi (20 km2)  2.0%%
Population
  Estimate 
(2018)
304,807
  Density813/sq mi (314/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district 7th
Website www.northamptoncounty.org

Northampton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 297,735. [1] Its county seat is Easton. [2] The county was formed in 1752 from parts of Bucks County. Its namesake was Northamptonshire and the county seat of Easton is named for the country house Easton Neston.

Contents

Northampton County is included in the Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the New York-Newark, NY-NJ-CT-PA Combined Statistical Area. Its northern edge borders The Poconos, and its eastern section borders the Delaware River, which divides Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

Northampton County also borders the Delaware Valley and is included in Philadelphia's Media Market

The county is industrially-oriented, producing cement, and other industrial products. Bethlehem Steel, once one of the world's largest manufacturers of steel, was located there prior to its closing in 2003.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 377 square miles (980 km2), of which 370 square miles (960 km2) is land and 7.7 square miles (20 km2) (2.0%) is water. [3] The climate is humid continental (mostly Dfa with a little Dfb in higher northern areas) and the hardiness zones are 6b and 6a. Average monthly temperatures in downtown Bethlehem average from 29.1° F in January to 74.1° F in July, while in Wind Gap they average from 27.0° F in January to 71.7° F in July.

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1790 24,220
1800 30,06224.1%
1810 38,14526.9%
1820 31,765−16.7%
1830 39,48224.3%
1840 40,9963.8%
1850 40,235−1.9%
1860 47,90419.1%
1870 61,43228.2%
1880 70,31214.5%
1890 84,22019.8%
1900 99,68718.4%
1910 127,66728.1%
1920 153,50620.2%
1930 169,30410.3%
1940 168,959−0.2%
1950 185,2439.6%
1960 201,4128.7%
1970 214,3686.4%
1980 225,4185.2%
1990 247,1059.6%
2000 267,0668.1%
2010 297,73511.5%
Est. 2018304,807 [4] [5] [6] 2.4%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]
1790-1960 [8] 1900-1990 [9]
1990-2000 [10] 2010-2017 [1]

As of the 2010 census, the county was 81.0% White Non-Hispanic, 5.0% Black or African American, 0.2% Native American or Alaskan Native, 2.4% Asian, 0.0% Native Hawaiian, 2.2% were two or more races, and 3.8% were some other race. 10.5% of the population were of Hispanic or Latino ancestry.

As of the census [11] of 2000, there were 267,066 people, 101,541 households, and 71,078 families residing in the county. The population density was 714 people per square mile (276/km2). There were 106,710 housing units at an average density of 286 per square mile (110/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 91.23% White, 2.77% Black or African American, 0.15% Native American, 1.37% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 3.06% from other races, and 1.39% from two or more races. 6.69% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 24.0% were of German, 14.0% Italian, 8.8% Irish, 5.1% English and 5.1% American ancestry. 89.3% spoke English and 5.5% Spanish as their first language.

There were 101,541 households out of which 31.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.40% were married couples living together, 9.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.00% were non-families. 24.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out with 23.30% under the age of 18, 9.20% from 18 to 24, 28.30% from 25 to 44, 23.40% from 45 to 64, and 15.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 94.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.70 males.

Government

Northampton is one of the seven counties in Pennsylvania which has adopted a home rule charter. Instead of being run by a Board of Commissioners and several Row Officers, voters elect an Executive, a nine-person Council, a Controller, and a District Attorney. The Executive, Controller and District Attorney are elected by all voters in the County, as are five members of the Council. The other four Councilmen are elected by districts. The Row Officers are nominated by the county executive and approved by county council.

Elected Officials

Politics

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [12]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 49.6%71,73645.8% 66,2724.5% 6,558
2012 46.9% 61,44651.6%67,6061.5% 1,992
2008 43.1% 58,55155.4%75,2551.6% 2,148
2004 49.0% 62,10250.0%63,4461.0% 1,301
2000 45.3% 47,39650.7%53,0974.0% 4,197
1996 39.3% 35,72648.3%43,95912.4% 11,317
1992 35.3% 34,42943.3%42,20321.4% 20,893
1988 51.5%42,74847.3% 39,2641.2% 966
1984 53.5%44,64845.5% 37,9791.0% 840
1980 47.1%35,78742.0% 31,92011.0% 8,330
1976 42.8% 32,92655.2%42,5142.0% 1,521
1972 56.3%41,82243.5% 32,3350.2% 124
1968 41.0% 32,03354.5%42,5544.5% 3,543
1964 26.2% 21,04873.1%58,8180.8% 619
1960 49.4% 40,68350.5%41,5520.1% 71
1956 55.8%43,37543.4% 33,7490.7% 573
1952 51.0%39,13148.2% 36,9930.8% 614
1948 44.0% 27,03054.0%33,2092.1% 1,265
1944 44.8% 26,64354.8%32,5840.5% 292
1940 43.1% 25,38556.5%33,3040.5% 269
1936 37.3% 22,82760.3%36,8712.4% 1,438
1932 45.0% 20,77952.0%24,0092.9% 1,345
1928 71.1%37,40328.1% 14,7680.8% 404
1924 58.4%20,45932.7% 11,4598.9% 3,104
1920 58.8%14,22737.5% 9,0863.7% 891
1916 44.4% 9,61050.8%11,0004.9% 1,050
1912 17.9% 3,89347.5%10,32534.6% 7,518
1908 46.9% 10,85749.1%11,3654.0% 923
1904 51.2%11,03946.0% 9,9142.8% 604
1900 45.1% 9,84952.3%11,4122.6% 556
1896 47.6% 9,76248.9%10,0323.5% 717
1892 39.2% 6,89258.7%10,3202.1% 367
1888 39.7% 6,78558.6%10,0271.7% 291

as of December 2019, there were 208,650 registered voters in Northampton County: [13]

In recent decades, Northampton has been identified as one of Pennsylvania's "swing counties," with statewide winners carrying it in most cases; since 1952, it has gone to the statewide winner in the presidential election. [14] All five statewide winners carried it in November 2004 and all four statewide Democratic candidates carried it in November 2008, with District Attorney John Morganelli doing well there despite losing statewide to incumbent Attorney General Tom Corbett. The Democratic Party has been dominant most of the time in county-level politics in recent decades. In 2016, Donald Trump ended that streak when he became the first Republican presidential candidate to win Northampton County since 1988.


Voting Machine Problems

Municipal elections were held across Pennsylvania in November, 2019, and results in Northampton County were plagued with problems caused by newly-purchased machines, The ExpressVoteXL, sold by the manufacturer Election Systems & Software (ES&S) as "a luxury “one-stop” voting system." According to the New York Times and other publications, it was a few minutes after the polls closed on Election Day when panic began to spread through the Northampton county election offices. Vote totals in one judge’s race showed one candidate, Abe Kassis, a Democrat, had just 164 votes out of 55,000 ballots across more than 100 precincts. Some machines reported zero votes for him.

The voting system, used in numerous Pennsylvania jurisdictions, combines a touch screen with a paper ballot backup. County officials determined the results by counting the paper ballots, which showed Mr. Kassis had won by 1,054 votes. Unofficial results were announced at 6AM on November 6th. The election results were certified following a canvass and audit. No challenges to the election results were filed.

County executives

Northampton County executives
NamePartyTerm startTerm end
Glenn F. Reibman Democratic 19982006
John StoffaDemocratic20062014
John Brown Republican 20142018
Lamont McClure Democratic 2018Incumbent

County Council members

State representatives [15]

State senators [15]

United States House of Representatives

United States Senate

Education

Colleges and universities

Map of Northampton County, Pennsylvania school districts Map of Northampton County Pennsylvania School Districts.png
Map of Northampton County, Pennsylvania school districts

Public school districts

Public charter schools

The Lehigh Valley Charter High School for the Performing Arts, Bethlehem

Private high schools

Transportation

Air transportation

Air transport to and from Northampton County is available through Lehigh Valley International Airport ( IATA : ABE, ICAO : KABE).

Bus transportation

Public bus service in Northampton County is available through the Lehigh and Northampton Transportation Authority, known as LANTA. A shuttle bus service, The Bethlehem Loop, also operates in Bethlehem. NJ Transit provides service from Easton's Centre Square to the Phillipsburg area.

Major highways

Telecommunications

Northampton County was once served only by the 215 area code from 1947 (when the North American Numbering Plan of the Bell System went into effect) until 1994. With the county's growing population, however, Northampton County was afforded area code 610 in 1994. Today, Northampton County is covered by 610 except for the Portland exchange which uses 570. An overlay area code, 484, was added to the 610 service area in 1999. [16] A plan to introduce area code 835 as an additional overlay was rescinded in 2001. [17]

Recreation

There are 2 Pennsylvania state parks in Northampton County.

Communities

Map of Northampton County, Pennsylvania with labels showing cities and boroughs (red), townships (white), and census-designated places (blue) Map of Northampton County Pennsylvania With Municipal and Township Labels.png
Map of Northampton County, Pennsylvania with labels showing cities and boroughs (red), townships (white), and census-designated places (blue)

Under Pennsylvania law, there are four types of incorporated municipalities: cities, boroughs, townships, and two towns. The following cities, boroughs and townships are located in Northampton County:

Cities

Boroughs

Townships

Census-designated places

Census-designated places are geographical areas designated by the U.S. Census Bureau for the purposes of compiling demographic data. They are not actual jurisdictions under Pennsylvania law. Other unincorporated communities, such as villages, may be listed here as well.

Population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Northampton County. [18]

county seat

RankCity/borough/township/etc.Municipal typePopulation (2010 Census)

1 Bethlehem (partially in Lehigh County )City74,982
2 Easton City26,800
3 Bethlehem Township Township23,730
4 Palmer Township Township20,691
5 Forks Township Township14,721
6 Hanover Township Township10,866
7 Lower Saucon Township Township10,772
8 Lehigh Township Township10,527
9 Northampton Borough9,926
10 Moore Township Township9,198
11 Bushkill Township Township8,178
12 Wilson Borough7,896
13 Middletown CDP7,441
14 Upper Mount Bethel Township Township6,706
15 Upper Nazareth Township Township6,231
16 Plainfield Township Township6,138
17 Hellertown Borough5,898
18 Williams Township Township5,884
19 Nazareth Borough5,746
20 Lower Nazareth Township Township5,674
21 Bangor Borough5,273
22 Washington Township Township5,122
23 East Allen Township Township4,930
24 Allen Township Township4,269
25 Palmer Heights CDP3,762
26 Pen Argyl Borough3,595
27 Eastlawn Gardens CDP3,307
28 Lower Mount Bethel Township Township3,101
29 North Catasauqua Borough2,849
30 Wind Gap Borough2,720
31 Bath Borough2,693
32 Freemansburg Borough2,636
33 Old Orchard CDP2,434
34 Walnutport Borough2,070
35 Cherryville CDP1,580
36 Roseto Borough1,567
T-37 Belfast CDP1,257
T-37 West Easton Borough1,257
39 Tatamy Borough1,203
40 East Bangor Borough1,172
41 Raubsville CDP1,088
42 Stockertown Borough927
43 Martins Creek CDP631
44 Ackermanville CDP610
45 Portland Borough519
46 Glendon Borough440
47 Chapman Borough199

Notable people

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

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Further reading

Coordinates: 40°45′N75°19′W / 40.75°N 75.31°W / 40.75; -75.31