Northumberland County, Pennsylvania

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Northumberland County
Northumberland County Courthouse - Sunbury, PA.jpg
Northumberland County Courthouse
Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Northumberland County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania in United States.svg
Pennsylvania's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 40°51′N76°43′W / 40.85°N 76.71°W / 40.85; -76.71
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Pennsylvania.svg  Pennsylvania
FoundedMarch 21, 1772
Named for Northumberland
Seat Sunbury
Largest citySunbury
Area
  Total478 sq mi (1,240 km2)
  Land458 sq mi (1,190 km2)
  Water19 sq mi (50 km2)  4.0%%
Population
 (2020)
  Total91,647 Decrease2.svg
  Density204/sq mi (79/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional districts 9th, 12th
Website www.northumberlandco.org

Northumberland County is a county in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It is part of Northeastern Pennsylvania. As of the 2020 census, the population was 91,647. [1] Its county seat is Sunbury. [2]

Contents

The county was formed in 1772 from parts of Lancaster, Berks, Bedford, Cumberland, and Northampton Counties and named for the county of Northumberland in northern England. Northumberland County is a fifth class county according to the Pennsylvania's County Code. [3] Northumberland County comprises the Sunbury, Pennsylvania Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Bloomsburg-Berwick-Sunbury, PA Combined Statistical Area. Among its notable residents, are Thomas L. Hamer a prior democratic congressman and Joseph Priestley, the Enlightenment chemist and theologian, left England in 1796 due to religious persecution and settled on the Susquehanna River. His former house, originally purchased by chemists from Pennsylvania State University after a colloquium that founded the American Chemical Society, [4] is a historical museum. [5]

History

Before European settlement the area was inhabited by the Akhrakouaeronon or Atrakouaehronon, a subtribe of the Susquehannock. By 1813 the area once comprising the sprawling county of Northumberland had been divided over time and allotted to other counties such that lands once occupied by Old Northumberland at its greatest extent are now found in Centre, Columbia, Luzerne, Lycoming, Mifflin, Union, Clearfield, Clinton, Montour, Bradford, Lackawanna, Susquehanna, Wyoming, Tioga, Potter, McKean, Warren, Venango, Snyder, and Schuylkill Counties.

Geography

Susquehanna River from the Shikellamy State Park overlook, looking upriver. The West Branch Susquehanna River is in the foreground. Susquehanna River from the Shikellamy State Park overlook.JPG
Susquehanna River from the Shikellamy State Park overlook, looking upriver. The West Branch Susquehanna River is in the foreground.
View looking northeast from the Shikellamy State Park overlook View from the Shikellamy State Park overlook (July 2015).JPG
View looking northeast from the Shikellamy State Park overlook

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 478 square miles (1,240 km2), of which 458 square miles (1,190 km2) is land and 19 square miles (49 km2) (4.0%) is water. [6]

The county has a humid continental climate (Dfa/Dfb). Average temperatures in Sunbury range from 27.3 °F in January to 72.7 °F in July, while in Mount Carmel they range from 25.0 °F in January to 70.2 °F in July. [7]

The main river in Northumberland County is the Susquehanna River and the divergence of the 977 miles (1,572 km) long river into its two branches of navigable river and former divisions of the Pennsylvania Canal System. The Susquehanna River's tributaries in the county include the West Branch Susquehanna River, Chillisquaque Creek, Shamokin Creek, and the west flowing Mahanoy Creek, whose valley is a rail and road transportation corridor to Tamaqua and points thereafter either east, north, or south such that: east along rail or US 209 through Nesquehoning and historic Jim Thorpe; else northeast via Beaver Meadows leading north into Hazleton and the lower Wyoming Valley, or into the central Wyoming Valley skirting along the western Poconos via White Haven and Mountain Top; or otherwise head south through the Schuylkill Gap into Port Carbon and thence west to the Lancaster County or east via the greater Reading area into the lower Schuylkill Valley and Philadelphia. The county has mountains in the south and north, with the rest being mostly rolling hills.

Mountains

NameHeight
Mahanoy Mountain433 meters
Big Mountain402 meters

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
1790 17,147
1800 27,79762.1%
1810 36,32730.7%
1820 15,424−57.5%
1830 18,13317.6%
1840 20,02710.4%
1850 23,27216.2%
1860 28,92224.3%
1870 41,44443.3%
1880 53,12328.2%
1890 74,69840.6%
1900 90,91121.7%
1910 111,42022.6%
1920 122,0799.6%
1930 128,5045.3%
1940 126,887−1.3%
1950 117,115−7.7%
1960 104,138−11.1%
1970 99,190−4.8%
1980 100,3811.2%
1990 96,771−3.6%
2000 94,556−2.3%
2010 94,5280.0%
2020 91,647−3.0%
U.S. Decennial Census [8]
1790–1960 [9] 1900–1990 [10]
1990–2000 [11] 2010–2017 [12] 2010-2020 [13]

As of the census [14] of 2000, there were 94,556 people, 38,835 households, and 25,592 families residing in the county. The population density was 206 people per square mile (79/km2). There were 43,164 housing units at an average density of 94 per square mile (36/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.09% White, 1.52% Black or African American, 0.10% Native American, 0.22% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.47% from other races, and 0.58% from two or more races. 1.10% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 32.5% were of German, 12.9% Polish, 9.9% American, 8.2% Italian, 8.1% Irish and 5.8% Dutch ancestry. 95.8% spoke English and 1.5% Spanish as their first language.

There were 38,835 households, out of which 27.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.40% were married couples living together, 9.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.10% were non-families. 30.20% of all households were made up of individuals, and 15.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.89.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 21.90% under the age of 18, 7.00% from 18 to 24, 27.70% from 25 to 44, 24.40% from 45 to 64, and 19.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 96.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.80 males.

2020 census

Northumberland County Racial Composition [15]
RaceNum.Perc.
White (NH)81,68989%
Black or African American (NH)2,3922.61%
Native American (NH)1100.12%
Asian (NH)4440.5%
Pacific Islander (NH)240.03%
Other/Mixed (NH)2,8373.1%
Hispanic or Latino 4,1514.52%

Micropolitan Statistical Area

Map of the Bloomsburg-Berwick-Sunbury, PA Combined Statistical Area (CSA), composed of the following parts:
.mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}
Bloomsburg-Berwick, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA)
Sunbury, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area (mSA)
Lewisburg, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area (mSA)
Selinsgrove, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area (mSA) BloomsburgBerwickSunburyCSA2014.jpg
Map of the Bloomsburg–Berwick-Sunbury, PA Combined Statistical Area (CSA), composed of the following parts:
  Sunbury, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area (μSA)

The United States Office of Management and Budget [16] has designated Northumberland County as the Sunbury, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area (µSA). As of the 2010 census [17] the micropolitan area ranked 2nd most populous in the State of Pennsylvania and the 37th most populous in the United States with a population of 94,528. Northumberland County is also a part of the Bloomsburg–Berwick–Sunbury, PA Combined Statistical Area (CSA), which combines the population of Northumberland County as well as the Columbia, Montour, Snyder and Union County areas. The Combined Statistical Area ranked 8th in the State of Pennsylvania and 115th most populous in the United States with a population of 264,739.

Politics and government

United States presidential election results for Northumberland County, Pennsylvania [18]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.%No.%No.%
2020 28,97568.28%12,70329.94%7571.78%
2016 25,42768.89%9,78826.52%1,6924.58%
2012 19,51858.51%13,07239.19%7662.30%
2008 19,01855.75%14,32942.00%7672.25%
2004 22,26259.95%14,60239.32%2700.73%
2000 18,14254.56%13,67041.11%1,4424.34%
1996 13,55141.82%13,41841.41%5,43116.76%
1992 15,05742.07%12,81435.80%7,92122.13%
1988 20,20758.07%14,25540.96%3380.97%
1984 22,10961.13%13,74838.01%3080.85%
1980 20,60856.79%13,75037.89%1,9325.32%
1976 19,28349.60%18,93948.72%6541.68%
1972 25,91264.16%13,88534.38%5881.46%
1968 22,36653.38%17,01340.60%2,5206.01%
1964 17,04637.68%28,08262.07%1160.26%
1960 27,56855.31%22,23344.61%400.08%
1956 28,58362.46%17,14137.45%410.09%
1952 28,86161.71%17,78938.04%1190.25%
1948 23,53558.13%16,47840.70%4721.17%
1944 21,99551.81%20,33347.90%1220.29%
1940 22,91446.41%26,31553.30%1390.28%
1936 21,75840.06%31,84958.63%7111.31%
1932 17,98242.25%23,11454.30%1,4683.45%
1928 30,94961.30%19,24938.12%2920.58%
1924 17,51656.18%7,57124.28%6,09019.53%
1920 17,28858.44%9,85433.31%2,4398.25%
1916 8,72245.00%9,33348.15%1,3296.86%
1912 2,37112.39%6,80235.53%9,97152.08%
1908 10,43951.97%8,59042.76%1,0585.27%
1904 11,21962.41%5,93633.02%8224.57%
1900 8,36649.35%7,98947.13%5963.52%
1896 8,65951.68%7,36743.97%7304.36%
1892 6,17044.95%6,94250.57%6154.48%
1888 6,28848.96%6,25748.72%2972.31%

As of November 7, 2022, there are 58,632 registered voters in Northumberland County. [19]

While county-level politics tend to be competitive, Northumberland is a Republican county in most statewide elections. The margins of victory in the county for the Republican presidential candidate in 2000, 2004, and 2008 have been 13, 21, and 14 percentage points, respectively. Governor Ed Rendell narrowly carried it against Lynn Swann while Republican Rick Santorum narrowly carried it against Bob Casey in 2006. The only Democratic statewide candidate to carry the county in 2008 was incumbent Auditor General Jack Wagner. In 2011, the election of Stephen Bridy resulted in a three-way split among the county commissioners.

County commissioners

Other county offices

State House of Representatives [20]

State Senator [20]

United States Representative

United States Senate

Education

Map of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania Public School Districts Map of Northumberland County Pennsylvania School Districts.png
Map of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania Public School Districts

Public school districts

Career Tech school

Northumberland County Career Technology Center located in Coal Township

Intermediate Unit

Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit 16 – The primary service area consists of: Columbia, Montour, Northumberland, Snyder and Union counties in central Pennsylvania. Provides a wide variety of education related services to school districts, private and parochial schools and hame schooled students.

Independent schools

Communities

Map of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania with Municipal Labels showing Cities and Boroughs (red), Townships (white), and Census-designated places (blue). Map of Northumberland CountyPennsylvania With Municipal and Township Labels.png
Map of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania with Municipal Labels showing Cities and Boroughs (red), Townships (white), and Census-designated places (blue).

Under Pennsylvania law, there are four types of incorporated municipalities: cities, boroughs, townships, and, in one case, a town. The following cities, boroughs, and townships are located in Northumberland County:

Cities

Boroughs

Townships

Census-designated places

Census-designated places are geographical areas designated by the U.S. Census Bureau for the purposes of compiling demographic data. They are not actual jurisdictions under Pennsylvania law. Other unincorporated communities, such as villages, may be listed here as well.

Unincorporated communities

Population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Northumberland County. [26]

county seat

RankCity/Town/etc.Municipal typePopulation (2010 Census)
1 Sunbury City9,905
2 Shamokin City7,374
3 Milton Borough7,042
4 Mount Carmel Borough5,893
5 Northumberland Borough3,804
6 Kulpmont Borough2,924
7 Paxinos CDP2,467
8 Edgewood CDP2,384
9 Watsontown Borough2,351
10 Elysburg CDP2,194
11 Fairview-Ferndale CDP2,139
12 Riverside Borough1,932
13 Trevorton CDP1,834
14 Dewart CDP1,471
15 Marshallton CDP1,441
16 Montandon CDP903
17 Kapp Heights CDP863
18 Atlas CDP809
19 Turbotville Borough705
20 Marion Heights Borough611
21 Ranshaw CDP510
22 Tharptown (Uniontown) CDP498
23 Dalmatia CDP488
24 Snydertown Borough339
25 Herndon Borough324
26 McEwensville Borough279
27 Strong CDP147

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Northumberland County, Pennsylvania". Census.gov. Retrieved July 20, 2022.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. "PA County Code Newspaper Handbook". Pennsylvania Newspaper Association. 2005. Archived from the original on February 25, 2017.
  4. Archived March 23, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  5. Joseph Priestley House Archived July 21, 2011, at the Wayback Machine . Joseph Priestley House. Retrieved on July 23, 2013.
  6. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 9, 2015.
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  12. "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved November 20, 2013.
  13. "Census 2020".
  14. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  15. "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE – 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) – Northumberland County, Pennsylvania".
  16. "Office of Management and Budget". The White House. Archived from the original on April 29, 2018. Retrieved August 5, 2015.
  17. Center for New Media and Promotions(C2PO). "2010 Census". census.gov. Retrieved August 5, 2015.
  18. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Archived from the original on March 23, 2018. Retrieved May 3, 2018.
  19. "Voter registration statistics by county". November 7, 2022.. Dos.state.pa.us. Retrieved on November 7, 2022.
  20. 1 2 Center, Legislativate Data Processing. "Find Your Legislator". The official website for the Pennsylvania General Assembly. Archived from the original on April 28, 2017. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  21. "Our Lady of Lourdes ONLINE!". Archived from the original on August 6, 2007.
  22. "St Louis de Montfort Academy". Archived from the original on December 26, 2013.
  23. "Sunbury Christian Academy". Archived from the original on February 4, 2014.
  24. Daily Item.com, New tutoring center opens, April 10, 2016
  25. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 Other Populated Places in Northumberland County (Map). PA HomeTownLocator. 2021. Retrieved March 4, 2021.
  26. Promotions, Center for New Media and. "US Census Bureau 2010 Census".

Coordinates: 40°51′N76°43′W / 40.85°N 76.71°W / 40.85; -76.71