David M. Kreps

Last updated
David M. Kreps
Alma mater Stanford University
Awards John Bates Clark Medal
Scientific career
Fields Game theory
Institutions Stanford University
Doctoral advisor Evan Lyle Porteus
Doctoral students Chi-fu Huang
Robert Gibbons

David Marc "Dave" Kreps (born 1950 in New York City) is a game theorist and economist and professor at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University. He is known for his analysis of dynamic choice models and non-cooperative game theory, particularly the idea of sequential equilibrium, which he developed with Stanford Business School colleague Robert B. Wilson.

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He earned his A.B. from Dartmouth College in 1972 and his Ph.D. from Stanford in 1975. Kreps won the John Bates Clark Medal in 1989. He was awarded an honorary Ph.D. by the Université Paris-Dauphine in 2001. With colleagues Paul Milgrom and Robert B. Wilson, he was awarded the 2018 John J. Carty Award for the Advancement of Science. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

He has also written many books, including Microeconomics for Managers, [1] A Course in Microeconomic Theory, and Game Theory and Economic Modeling. [2]

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References

  1. David M. Kreps (2004). Microeconomics for Managers. Norton. ISBN   978-0-393-97678-6.
  2. David M. Kreps (1990). Game Theory and Economic Modelling. Oxford University Press. ISBN   978-0-19-828381-2.