Strictly determined game

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In game theory, a strictly determined game is a two-player zero-sum game that has at least one Nash equilibrium with both players using pure strategies. The value of a strictly determined game is equal to the value of the equilibrium outcome. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] Most finite combinatorial games, like tic-tac-toe, chess, draughts, and go, are strictly determined games.

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Notes

The study and classification of strictly determined games is distinct from the study of Determinacy, which is a subfield of set theory.

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Game without a value

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References

  1. Waner, Stefan (1995–1996). "Chapter G Summary Finite" . Retrieved 24 April 2009.
  2. Steven J. Brams (2004). "Two person zero-sum games with saddlepoints". Game Theory and Politics. Courier Dover Publications. pp. 5–6. ISBN   9780486434971.
  3. Saul Stahl (1999). "Solutions of zero-sum games". A gentle introduction to game theory. AMS Bookstore. p.  54. ISBN   9780821813393.
  4. Abraham M. Glicksman (2001). "Elementary aspects of the theory of games". An Introduction to Linear Programming and the Theory of Games. Courier Dover Publications. p. 94. ISBN   9780486417103.
  5. Czes Kośniowski (1983). "Playing the Game". Fun mathematics on your microcomputer. Cambridge University Press. p. 68. ISBN   9780521274517.