Roger Myerson

Last updated
Roger Myerson
Myerson roger b print.jpg
Born (1951-03-29) March 29, 1951 (age 69)
Nationality United States
Career information
Field Game theory
Institution University of Chicago
Northwestern University
Alma mater Harvard University (AB, SM, PhD)
Doctoral
advisor
Kenneth Arrow
Doctoral
students
Scott E. Page
Contributions Mechanism design
Awards
Awards Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (2007)
Information at IDEAS / RePEc

Roger Bruce Myerson (born 1951) is an American economist and professor at the University of Chicago. He holds the title of the David L. Pearson Distinguished Service Professor of Global Conflict Studies at The Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts in the Harris School of Public Policy, the Griffin Department of Economics, and the College. [1] Previously, he held the title The Glen A. Lloyd Distinguished Service Professor of Economics. [2] In 2007, he was the winner of the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel with Leonid Hurwicz and Eric Maskin for "having laid the foundations of mechanism design theory." [3] He was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 2019. [4]

Contents

Biography

Roger Myerson was born in 1951 in Boston. He attended Harvard University, where he received his A.B., summa cum laude , and S.M. in applied mathematics in 1973. He completed his Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Harvard University in 1976. [5] His doctorate thesis was A Theory of Cooperative Games. [6]

From 1976 to 2001, Myerson was a professor of economics at Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management, where he conducted much of his Nobel-winning research. [7] From 1978 to 1979, he was Visiting Researcher at Bielefeld University. He was Visiting Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago from 1985–86 and from 2000–01. He became Professor of Economics at Chicago in 2001. Currently, he is the inaugural David L. Pearson Distinguished Service Professor of Global Conflict Studies at the University of Chicago. [8]

Awards and Honors

Bank of Sweden Nobel Memorial Prize

Myerson was one of the three winners of the 2007 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, the other two being Leonid Hurwicz of the University of Minnesota, and Eric Maskin of the Institute for Advanced Study. He was awarded the prize for his contributions to mechanism design theory. [9]

Myerson made a path-breaking contribution to mechanism design theory when he discovered a fundamental connection between the allocation to be implemented and the monetary transfers needed to induce informed agents to reveal their information truthfully. Mechanism design theory allows for people to distinguish situations in which markets work well from those in which they do not. The theory has helped economists identify efficient trading mechanisms, regulation schemes, and voting procedures. Today, the theory plays a central role in many areas of economics and parts of political science. [9]

Memberships and Honors

Myerson is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the American Philosophical Society. [6] He is a Fellow of the Game Theory Society [10] and serves as an advisory board member on the International Journal of Game Theory. [11] Myerson holds an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Basel in 2002 [12] and received the Jean-Jacques Laffont Prize in 2009. [13]

Personal life

In 1980, Myerson married Regina (née Weber) and the couple had two children, Daniel and Rebecca. [14]

Publications

Game theory and mechanism design

He wrote a general textbook on game theory in 1991, and has also written on the history of game theory, including his review of the origins and significance of noncooperative game theory. [15] He also served on the editorial board of the International Journal of Game Theory for ten years.

Myerson has worked on economic analysis of political institutions and written several major survey papers:

His recent work on democratization has raised critical questions about American policy in occupied Iraq:

Books

Concepts named after him

See also

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References

  1. "Roger Myerson Pearson Institute Faculty Profile".
  2. "Prof. Myerson's University of Chicago Department of Economics Profile".
  3. "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2007" (Press release). Nobel Foundation. October 15, 2007. Retrieved 2008-08-15.
  4. "APS Announces 2019 Class of New Members".
  5. "Front & Center with John Callaway: The Global Economic Crisis | Pritzker Military Museum & Library | Chicago".
  6. 1 2 "Curriculum Vitae of Roger Myerson" (PDF). Retrieved 2008-08-15.
  7. JUF News: Nobel Prize winners have Jewish, Chicago connections
  8. "Roger Myerson appointed inaugural David L. Pearson Distinguished Service Professor" . Retrieved 2019-12-23.
  9. 1 2 "Roger Myerson wins 2007 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics". University of Chicago. 2007-10-17. Retrieved 2008-08-16.
  10. "Game Theory Society - People".
  11. "International Journal of Game Theory Editors".
  12. "Honorary Awards Faculty of Business and Economics".
  13. "Jean Jacques Laffont Prize Former Laureates".
  14. "Roger B. Myerson – Autobiography". Nobelprize.org.
  15. Myerson, Roger B. (1999). "Nash Equilibrium and the History of Economic Theory". Journal of Economic Literature . 37 (3): 1067–1082. CiteSeerX   10.1.1.130.7955 . doi:10.1257/jel.37.3.1067. JSTOR   2564872.
Awards
Preceded by
Edmund S. Phelps
Laureate of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics
2007
Served alongside: Leonid Hurwicz, Eric S. Maskin
Succeeded by
Paul Krugman