Jacob Marschak

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Jacob Marschak
Marschak.png
Born(1898-07-23)23 July 1898
Died27 July 1977(1977-07-27) (aged 79)
NationalityAmerican
Alma mater University of Heidelberg
Known for Elasticity of demand
Early econometrics
Choice under uncertainty
Scientific career
FieldsEconomics
Institutions Cowles Commission
University of Chicago
Doctoral advisor Emil Lederer
Doctoral students Leonid Hurwicz
Harry Markowitz
Franco Modigliani

Jacob Marschak (23 July 1898 – 27 July 1977) was an American economist.

Contents

Life

Born in a Jewish family of Kiev, Jacob Marschak (until 1933 Jakob) was the son of a jeweller. During his studies he joined the social democratic Menshevik Party, becoming a member of the Menshevik International Caucus. In 1918 he was the labor minister in the Terek Soviet Republic. In 1919 he emigrated to Germany, where he studied at the University of Berlin and the University of Heidelberg.

In 1922–1926 he was a journalist, and in 1928 he joined the new Kiel Institut für Weltwirtschaft . With the gathering Nazi storm, he emigrated to England, where he went to Oxford to teach at the Oxford Institute of Statistics, which was funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, allowing him to emigrate in 1940 to the United States. After teaching at the New School for Social Research, in 1943 he went to University of Chicago, where he led the Cowles Commission. He followed the commission's move to Yale University, then became emeritus at UCLA.

In 1972 he co-founded Team Theory with Roy Radner.

Marschak was fluent in approximately one dozen languages. Shortly before he was due to become president of the American Economic Association, he died from a cardiac arrest.

UCLA sponsors the recurring Jacob Marschak Interdisciplinary Colloquium on Mathematics in the Behavior Sciences.

Major publications

Books

Chapters in books

Translates as:Marschak, Jacob; Lederer, Emil, "New middle class", in Lederer, Jacob (ed.), New middle class, Isha Books, ISBN   9789332875661.

Journal articles

Honours

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