Kevin M. Murphy

Last updated

Kevin M. Murphy
Born1958 (age 6162)
NationalityUnited States
Institution University of Chicago
Field Social economics
School or
tradition
Chicago School of Economics
Alma materUniversity of Chicago
UCLA
Doctoral
advisor
Sherwin Rosen
Doctoral
students
Luis Garicano
Influences Armen Alchian
Gary Becker
Robert Topel
Finis Welch
Awards John Bates Clark Medal (1997)
MacArthur Fellows Program (2005)
John von Neumann Award (2008)
Information at IDEAS / RePEc

Kevin Miles Murphy (born 1958) is the George J. Stigler Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution. [1]

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In 1997 Murphy was awarded the prestigious John Bates Clark Medal by the American Economic Association, given once every two years to the most outstanding American economist under the age of forty, and widely considered to be the second most prestigious prize in economics (after the Nobel Prize in Economics). Murphy was cited for his study of the causes of growing income inequality between white-collar and blue-collar workers in the United States and his research linking the growth in income inequality to growth in the demand for skilled labor. His other research has covered such topics as economic growth, income inequality, valuing medical research, rational addiction, and unemployment.

Murphy has authored over 50 published articles on a variety of topics including a cost–benefit analysis of the war in Iraq. [2]

On September 20, 2005, he was named as one of the 2005 recipients of the MacArthur Fellowship, often referred to as the "genius grant."

Education: B.A. (economics, Phi Beta Kappa ), University of California, Los Angeles, 1981; PhD, University of Chicago, 1986 (thesis: Specialization and Human Capital).

Major works

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References