Official Congressional Directory

Last updated
Official Congressional Directory
Author United States Congress Joint Committee on Printing
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Subject Political Reference
Genre Non-fiction
Publisher United States Government Printing Office
Publication date
1789
Media typePrint (Paperback)

The Official Congressional Directory (also known as Congressional Directory) is the official directory of the United States Congress, prepared by the Joint Committee on Printing (JCP) and published by the United States Government Printing Office (GPO) since 1887. Directories since the 104th Congress (1995–1997) are available online from the Government Publishing Office. Per federal statute (44 USC 721) the Directory is published and distributed during the first session of each new Congress. [1] It is a designated essential title distributed to Federal depository libraries and the current edition is available for purchase from GPO.

Contents

Description

The foreword notes: The Congressional Directory is one of the oldest working handbooks within the United States Government. While there were unofficial directories for Congress in one form or another beginning with the 1st Congress in 1789, the Congressional Directory published in 1847 for the 30th Congress is considered by scholars and historians to be the first official edition because it was the first to be ordered and paid for by Congress. With the addition of biographical sketches of legislators in 1867, the Congressional Directory attained its modern format. [2]

Each bi-annual edition includes:

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Massachusettss 3rd congressional district

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Massachusettss 4th congressional district

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Massachusettss 9th congressional district

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Massachusettss 5th congressional district

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References

  1. Congressional Directory: Main Page Archived 2009-04-30 at the Wayback Machine
  2. "govinfo". www.govinfo.gov.

Further reading

19th century

1860s-1870s

1880s

1890s

20th century

1900s-1910s

1920s-1930s

1940s-1950s

1960s-1970s

1980s-1990s

21st century