Salaries of members of the United States Congress

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This chart shows historical information on the salaries that members of the United States Congress have been paid. [1] The Government Ethics Reform Act of 1989 provides for an automatic increase in salary each year as a cost of living adjustment that reflects the employment cost index. [2] Since 2010 Congress has annually voted not to accept the increase, keeping it at the same nominal amount since 2009. The Twenty-seventh Amendment to the United States Constitution, ratified in 1992, prohibits any law affecting compensation from taking effect until after the next election.

YearSalary Per diem/annum Percent adjustmentIn 2019 dollars
1789$50per annum
1795$1per diem only Representatives
$7per diem only Senators
1796$6per diem
1815$1,500per annum$20,954
1817$6per diem only Representatives$96
$7per diem only Senators$112
1818$8per diem$134
1855$3,000per annum$82,318
1865$5,000per annum$83,511
1871$7,500per annum$160,063
1874$5,000per annum$112,985
1907$7,500per annum$205,795
1925$10,000per annum$145,787
1932$9,000per annum$168,651
1933$8,500per annum$167,880
1934 (2/1)$9,000per annum$172,007
1934 (7/1)$9,500per annum$181,563
1935$10,000per annum$186,481
1947$12,500per annum$143,126
1955$22,500per annum$214,742
1965$30,000per annum$243,390
1969$42,500per annum$296,304
1975$44,600per annum$211,912
1977$57,500per annum$242,599
1979$60,662.50per annum$213,696
1982$69,800per annum only Representatives$184,922
1983$69,800per annum only Senators$179,176
1984$72,600per annum$178,663
1985$75,100per annum$178,525
1987 (1/1)$77,400per annum$174,184
1987 (2/4)$89,500per annum$201,414
1990 (2/1)$96,600per annum only Representatives$189,042
1990 (2/1)$98,400per annum only Senators$192,564
1991 (1/1)$125,100per annum only Representatives$234,826
1991 (1/1)$101,900per annum only Senators$191,277
1991 (8/14)$125,100per annum only Senators$234,826
1992$129,500per annum3.5%$235,938
1993$133,600per annum3.2%$236,454
1998$136,700per annum2.3%$214,428
2000$141,300per annum3.4%$209,779
2001$145,100per annum2.7%$209,510
2002$150,000per annum3.4%$213,219
2003$154,700per annum3.1%$215,007
2004$158,100per annum2.2%$214,003
2005$162,100per annum2.5%$212,202
2006$165,200per annum1.9%$209,513
2008$169,300per annum2.5%$201,040
2009$174,000per annum2.8%$207,359
Salaries, shown for US Senators and US Representatives. Also shown: salaries adjusted to 2014 US Dollars. Salaries of Members of the United States Congress.png
Salaries, shown for US Senators and US Representatives. Also shown: salaries adjusted to 2014 US Dollars.

Additional pay schedule for the Senate and House positions:

SCHEDULE 6—VICE PRESIDENT AND MEMBERS OF CONGRESS [3]

PositionSalary
Vice President$230,700
Senators and House Representatives$174,000
Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico$174,000
President pro tempore of the Senate$193,400
Majority leader and minority leader of the Senate$193,400
Majority leader and minority leader of the House of Representatives$193,900
Speaker of the House of Representatives$223,500

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References

  1. Brudnick, Ida A. (April 11, 2018). Salaries of Members of Congress: Recent Actions and Historical Tables (PDF). Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  2. "Do Members of Congress get Automatic Pay Hikes (COLAs)?". National Taxpayers Union. Retrieved 2018-08-02.
  3. Executive Order 13655 of December 23, 2013, Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay. Office of Personnel Management – Pay & Leave – SALARIES & WAGES – Executive Order for 2014 Pay Schedules

https://www.senate.gov/CRSpubs/9c14ec69-c4e4-4bd8-8953-f73daa1640e4.pdf