Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee

Last updated
Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee
DCCC Logo-RGB.png
Founded1866
PurposeTo elect Democrats to the United States House of Representatives
Location
Chair
Sean Patrick Maloney
Website https://dccc.org

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC, sometimes spoken of as "D triple-C" or "D-trip") is the Democratic Hill committee for the United States House of Representatives, working to elect Democrats to that body. [1] The DCCC recruits candidates, raises funds, and organizes races in districts that are expected to yield politically notable or close elections. The structure of the committee consists, essentially, of the Chairperson (who according to current Democratic Caucus rules is a fellow member of the Caucus appointed by the party leader in the House), their staff, and other Democratic members of Congress that serve in roles supporting the functions of the committee.

Contents

The Chairperson of the DCCC is the sixth-ranking position among House Democrats, after the Speaker, the Majority Leader, the Majority Whip, the House Assistant Democratic Leader, and the Democratic Caucus Chairperson. The current chair is Sean Patrick Maloney of New York, who assumed the position in 2021. [2]

History

The DCCC originated in 1866 as the Democratic National Congressional Committee.

Due to the reform of campaign finance legislation that took effect in the 2004 election cycle, the DCCC splits into two organizations a few months before each Election Day:

  1. One organization (the "Coordinated" campaign) can continue to stay in contact with the individual congressional campaigns, offering advice and suggestions to candidates and their staffs in each race.
  2. The other organization (the "Independent Expenditure" campaign), which makes independent expenditures in congressional districts on behalf of the campaigns, is not allowed to coordinate activities with the campaigns.

In recent elections, the DCCC has played an expansive role in supporting Democratic candidates with independently produced television ads and mail pieces.

Rahm Emanuel assumed the position of DCCC committee chair after the death of the previous chair, Bob Matsui, at the end of the 2004 election cycle. Emanuel led the Democratic Party's successful effort to capture the majority in the House of Representatives in the 2006 elections. After Emanuel's election as chair of the Democratic Caucus, Chris Van Hollen became committee chair for the 110th Congress and the 2008 elections. He continued through the 2010 elections. For the 2014 election cycle, Democratic Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi appointed congressman Ben Ray Luján to serve as the committee's chair.

Alleged Russian hacking

In July 2016, the DCCC said it was hacked. [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] Subsequently, a person described as a hacker and known as "Guccifer 2.0" (Russian Main Intelligence Directorate persona) reportedly released documents and information that were obtained from the cyberattack on the DCCC. [8]

List of chairs

Name State Term of service
James Rood Doolittle Wisconsin 1868
Joseph Clay Stiles Blackburn Kentucky 1878
William A. Wallace Pennsylvania 1880
William Rosecrans California 1882
Arthur Pue Gorman Maryland 1884
John E. Kenna West Virginia 1886
James T. Jones Alabama 1888
Roswell P. Flower New York 1890
John L. Mitchell Wisconsin 1892
Charles James Faulkner West Virginia 1894–1896
Stephen M. White California 1898
James D. Richardson Tennessee 1900
James M. Griggs Georgia 1902–1908
James Tilghman Lloyd Missouri 1909–1913
Frank Ellsworth Doremus Michigan 1913–1917
Scott Ferris Oklahoma 1917–1921
Arthur B. Rouse Kentucky 1921–1924
William Allan Oldfield Arkansas 1925–1928
Joseph W. Byrns Sr. Tennessee 1928–1935
Patrick H. Drewry Virginia 1935–1947
Michael J. Kirwan Ohio 1947–1969
Michael A. Feighan Ohio 1969–1971
Tip O'Neill Massachusetts 1971–1973
Wayne Hays Ohio 1973–1976
James C. Corman California 1976–1981
Tony Coelho California 1981–1987
Beryl Anthony Jr. Arkansas 1987–1991
Victor H. Fazio California 1991–1995
Martin Frost Texas 1995–1999
Patrick J. Kennedy Rhode Island 1999–2001
Nita Lowey New York 2001–2003
Bob Matsui California 2003–2005
Rahm Emanuel Illinois 2005–2007
Chris Van Hollen Maryland 2007–2011
Steve Israel New York 2011–2014
Ben Ray Luján New Mexico 2014–2019
Cheri Bustos Illinois 2019–2020
Sean Patrick Maloney New York 2021–present

See also

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References

  1. Bowden, John (March 30, 2019). "Progressives hammer DCCC over blacklist targeting primary challenges". The Hill.
  2. Marans, Daniel (3 December 2020). "Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney Elected To Run House Democrats' Campaign Arm". www.huffpost.com. Retrieved 3 December 2020.
  3. Neidig, Harper (29 July 2016). "House Dem campaign arm says it was hacked". The Hill . Retrieved 3 August 2016.
  4. "Exclusive: FBI probes hacking of Democratic congressional group - sources". Reuters. 29 July 2016. Retrieved 3 August 2016 via Reuters.
  5. "Fundraising Nonprofit Says It Wasn't Compromised In DCCC Hack". Talking Points Memo . Retrieved 3 August 2016.
  6. "Democratic Party's congressional fundraising committee was also hacked". Ars Technica . Retrieved 3 August 2016.
  7. King, Bob; Starks, Tim (2016-07-28). "Hackers suspected in new attack on Democrats". Politico.Com. Retrieved 2016-08-13.
  8. Diaz, Daniella (2016-08-13). "Hacker releases cell phone numbers, personal emails of House Democrats". CNN. Retrieved 2016-08-13.