2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries

Last updated

2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries
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  2016 February 3 to August 11, 20202024 

  Joe Biden February 2020 crop.jpg Bernie Sanders March 2020 (cropped).jpg Elizabeth Warren by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg
Candidate Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren
Home state Delaware Vermont Massachusetts
Estimated delegate count1,566 [2] 1,007 [2] 58 [2]
Contests won2790
Popular vote12,110,973 [3] 8,426,458 [3] 2,605,580 [3]
Percentage43.65%30.37%9.39%

  Michael Bloomberg by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg Pete Buttigieg by Gage Skidmore 2 (cropped).jpg Amy Klobuchar by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg
Candidate Michael Bloomberg Pete Buttigieg Amy Klobuchar
Home state New York Indiana Minnesota
Estimated delegate count43 [2] 21 [2] 7 [2]
Contests won110
Popular vote2,420,660 [3] 854,378 [3] 494,695 [3]
Percentage8.72%3.08%1.78%

  Tulsi Gabbard (48011616441) (cropped).jpg
Candidate Tulsi Gabbard
Home state Hawaii
Estimated delegate count2 [2]
Contests won0
Popular vote190,933 [3]
Percentage0.69%

2020 California Democratic primary2020 Oregon Democratic primary2020 Washington Democratic primary2020 Idaho Democratic primary2020 Nevada Democratic caucuses2020 Utah Democratic primary2020 Arizona Democratic primary2020 Montana Democratic primary2020 Wyoming Democratic caucuses2020 Colorado Democratic primary2020 New Mexico Democratic primary2020 North Dakota Democratic caucuses2020 South Dakota Democratic primary2020 Nebraska Democratic primary2020 Kansas Democratic primary2020 Oklahoma Democratic primary2020 Texas Democratic primary2020 Minnesota Democratic primary2020 Iowa Democratic caucuses2020 Missouri Democratic primary2020 Arkansas Democratic primary2020 Louisiana Democratic primary2020 Wisconsin Democratic primary2020 Illinois Democratic primary2020 Michigan Democratic primary2020 Indiana Democratic primary2020 Ohio Democratic primary2020 Kentucky Democratic primary2020 Tennessee Democratic primary2020 Mississippi Democratic primary2020 Alabama Democratic primary2020 Georgia Democratic primary2020 Florida Democratic primary2020 South Carolina Democratic primary2020 North Carolina Democratic primary2020 Virginia Democratic primary2020 West Virginia Democratic primary2020 District of Columbia Democratic primary2020 Maryland Democratic primary2020 Delaware Democratic primary2020 Pennsylvania Democratic primary2020 New Jersey Democratic primary2020 New York Democratic primary2020 Connecticut Democratic primary2020 Rhode Island Democratic primary2020 Vermont Democratic primary2020 New Hampshire Democratic primary2020 Maine Democratic primary2020 Massachusetts Democratic primary2020 Alaska Democratic primary2020 Hawaii Democratic primary2020 Puerto Rico Democratic primary2020 United States Virgin Islands Democratic caucuses2020 Northern Mariana Islands Democratic caucuses2020 American Samoa Democratic caucuses2020 Guam Democratic caucuses2020 Democrats Abroad primary2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries
2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries
2020 California Democratic primary2020 Oregon Democratic primary2020 Washington Democratic primary2020 Idaho Democratic primary2020 Nevada Democratic caucuses2020 Utah Democratic primary2020 Arizona Democratic primary2020 Montana Democratic primary2020 Wyoming Democratic caucuses2020 Colorado Democratic primary2020 New Mexico Democratic primary2020 North Dakota Democratic caucuses2020 South Dakota Democratic primary2020 Nebraska Democratic primary2020 Kansas Democratic primary2020 Oklahoma Democratic primary2020 Texas Democratic primary2020 Minnesota Democratic primary2020 Iowa Democratic caucuses2020 Missouri Democratic primary2020 Arkansas Democratic primary2020 Louisiana Democratic primary2020 Wisconsin Democratic primary2020 Illinois Democratic primary2020 Michigan Democratic primary2020 Indiana Democratic primary2020 Ohio Democratic primary2020 Kentucky Democratic primary2020 Tennessee Democratic primary2020 Mississippi Democratic primary2020 Alabama Democratic primary2020 Georgia Democratic primary2020 Florida Democratic primary2020 South Carolina Democratic primary2020 North Carolina Democratic primary2020 Virginia Democratic primary2020 West Virginia Democratic primary2020 District of Columbia Democratic primary2020 Maryland Democratic primary2020 Delaware Democratic primary2020 Pennsylvania Democratic primary2020 New Jersey Democratic primary2020 New York Democratic primary2020 Connecticut Democratic primary2020 Rhode Island Democratic primary2020 Vermont Democratic primary2020 New Hampshire Democratic primary2020 Maine Democratic primary2020 Massachusetts Democratic primary2020 Alaska Democratic primary2020 Hawaii Democratic primary2020 Puerto Rico Democratic primary2020 United States Virgin Islands Democratic caucuses2020 Northern Mariana Islands Democratic caucuses2020 American Samoa Democratic caucuses2020 Guam Democratic caucuses2020 Democrats Abroad primary2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries
2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries

Previous Democratic nominee

Hillary Clinton

Presumptive Democratic nominee

Joe Biden

The 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries and caucuses are a series of electoral contests organized by the Democratic Party to select the approximately 3,979 [lower-alpha 1] pledged delegates to the 2020 Democratic National Convention. Those delegates will elect the Democratic nominee for president of the United States in the 2020 U.S. presidential election. [4] If a candidate amasses at least 1,991 [5] [6] pledged delegates by the DNC convention in August (formerly July), [7] they will be the nominee. The elections are taking place from February to August 2020 in all fifty U.S. states, the District of Columbia, five U.S. territories, and among Democrats Abroad.

Contents

Independent of the result of primaries and caucuses, the Democratic Party will, from its group of party leaders and elected officials, also appoint 771 [lower-alpha 2] unpledged delegates (superdelegates) to participate in its national convention. In contrast to all previous election cycles since superdelegates were introduced in 1984, superdelegates will no longer have the right to cast decisive votes at the convention's first ballot for the presidential nomination. They will be allowed to cast non-decisive votes if a candidate has clinched the nomination before the first ballot, or decisive votes on subsequent ballots in a contested convention. [4] [8] [9]

Overall, there were 29 major Democratic presidential candidates in the 2020 election, and for six weeks around July 2019, 25 of these had active campaigns simultaneously. On April 8, 2020, former Vice President Joe Biden became the presumptive nominee after Senator Bernie Sanders, the only other major candidate left, suspended his campaign. [10] Sanders endorsed Biden a few days later. [11]

Background

After Hillary Clinton's loss in the previous election, many felt the Democratic Party lacked a clear leading figure. [12] Divisions remained in the party following the 2016 primaries, which pitted Clinton against Bernie Sanders. [13] [14] Between the 2016 election and the 2018 midterm elections, Senate Democrats generally shifted to the political left in relation to college tuition, healthcare, and immigration. [15] [16] The 2018 elections saw the Democratic Party regain the House of Representatives for the first time in eight years, picking up seats in both urban and suburban districts. [17] [18]

The 2020 field of Democratic presidential candidates peaked at more than two dozen major candidates. [19] According to Politifact, this field is believed to be the largest field of presidential candidates for any American political party since 1972; [lower-alpha 3] it exceeds the field of 17 major candidates who sought the Republican presidential nomination in 2016. [21] In May 2019, CBS News referred to the field of 2020 Democratic presidential candidates as "the largest and most diverse Democratic primary field in modern history", including six major female presidential candidates and seven major candidates of African, Hispanic, Asian, or Pacific Islander ancestry. [22]

Reforms since 2016

On August 25, 2018, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) members passed reforms to the Democratic Party's primary process in order to increase participation [23] and ensure transparency. [24] State parties are encouraged to use a government-run primary whenever available and increase the accessibility of their primary through same-day or automatic registration and same-day party switching. Caucuses are required to have absentee voting, or to otherwise allow those who cannot participate in person to be included. [23]

The reforms mandate that automatic delegates ("superdelegates") refrain from voting on the first presidential nominating ballot, unless a candidate via the outcome of primaries and caucuses already has gained a majority of all delegates, including superdelegates. [25] In a contested convention where no majority of minimum pledged delegate votes is found for a single candidate on the first ballot, all superdelegates will then regain their right to vote on any subsequent ballot necessary in order for a presidential candidate to be nominated, wherein the number of votes required shall increase to a majority of pledged and superdelegates combined. [4] Superdelegates are not precluded from publicly endorsing a candidate of their choosing before the convention.

There were also a number of changes to the process of nomination at the state level. A decline in the number of caucuses occurred after 2016, with Democrats in Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, and Washington all switching from various forms of caucuses to primaries (with Hawaii, Kansas, and North Dakota switching to party-run "firehouse primaries"). This has resulted in the lowest number of caucuses in the Democratic Party's recent history, with only three states (Iowa, Nevada, and Wyoming) and four territories (American Samoa, Guam, Northern Marianas, and U.S. Virgin Islands) using them. In addition, six states were approved in 2019 by the DNC to use ranked-choice voting in the primaries: Alaska, Hawaii, Kansas, and Wyoming for all voters; Iowa and Nevada for absentee voters. [26] Rather than eliminating candidates until a single winner is chosen, voters' choices would be reallocated until all remaining candidates have at least 15%, the threshold to receive delegates to the convention. [27]

Several states which did not use paper ballots widely in 2016 and 2018, adopted them for the 2020 primary and general elections, [28] to minimize potential interference in vote tallies, a concern raised by intelligence officials, [29] election officials [30] and the public. [31] The move to paper ballots enabled audits to start where they had not been possible before, and in 2020 about half the states audit samples of primary ballots to measure accuracy of the reported results. [32] Audits of caucus results depend on party rules, and the Iowa Democratic party investigated inaccuracies in precinct reports, resolved enough to be sure the delegate allocations were correct, and decided it did not have authority or time to correct all errors. [33] [34] [35]

Rules for number of delegates

Number of pledged delegates per state

The number of pledged delegates from each state is proportional to the state's share of the electoral college, and to the state's past Democratic votes for president. [36] [37] Thus less weight is given to swing states and Republican states, while more weight is given to strongly Democratic states, in choosing a nominee.

Six pledged delegates are assigned to each territory, 44 to Puerto Rico, and 12 to Democrats Abroad. Each jurisdiction can also earn bonus delegates by holding primaries after March or in clusters of 3 or more neighboring states. [36]

Within states, a quarter of pledged delegates are allocated to candidates based on statewide vote totals, and the rest based on votes in each Congressional District, though some states use divisions other than congressional districts. For example, Texas uses state Senate districts. [38] [36] Districts which have voted Democratic in the past get more delegates, and fewer delegates are allocated for swing districts and Republican districts. [36] For example, House Speaker Pelosi's strongly Democratic district 12 has 7 delegates, or one per 109,000 people, and a swing district, CA-10, which became Democratic in 2018, has 4 delegates, or one per 190,000 people. [39] [40] [41]

Candidate threshold

Candidates who get under 15% of the votes in a state or district get no delegates from that area. Candidates who get 15% or more of the votes divide delegates in proportion to their votes. [39] [42] These rules apply at the state level to state delegates and within each district for those delegates. The 15% threshold was established in 1992 [43] to limit "fringe" candidates. [44] The threshold now means that any sector of the party (moderate, progressive, etc.) which produces many candidates, thus dividing supporters' votes, may win few delegates, even if it wins a majority of votes. [44] [45] [43]

Schedule and results

Several states below use Ranked-choice voting. In these, only the final result is given.

Date
(daily totals)
Total pledged
delegates
ContestDelegates won and popular vote [46]
Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren Michael Bloomberg Pete Buttigieg Amy Klobuchar Tulsi Gabbard
February 341 Iowa 14
23,291 (13.7%)
12
45,652 (26.5%)
5
34,909 (20.3%)
9
43,209 (25.1%)
1
21,100 (12.2%)

16 (0.0%)
February 1124 New Hampshire
24,911 (8.4%)
9
76,352 (25.6%)

27,427 (9.2%)

4,777 (1.6%)
9
72,445 (24.3%)
6
58,774 (19.7%)

9,655 (3.3%)
February 2236 Nevada 9
19,179 (18.9%)
24
41,075 (40.5%)

11,703 (11.5%)
3
17,598 (17.3%)

7,376 (7.3%)

32 (0.0%)
February 2954 South Carolina 39
262,336 (48.7%)
15
106,605 (19.8%)

38,120 (7.1%)

44,217 (8.2%)

16,900 (3.1%)

6,813 (1.3%)
March 3
(Super Tuesday)
(1,344)
52 Alabama 44
286,630 (63.2%)
8
75,326 (16.6%)

26,125 (5.8%)

52,844 (11.6%)

1,466 (0.3%)

914 (0.2%)

1,067 (0.2%)
6 American Samoa
31 (8.8%)

37 (10.5%)

5 (1.4%)
4
175 (49.9%)
2
103 (29.3%)
31 Arkansas 19
92,586 (40.5%)
9
51,117 (22.4%)

22,860 (10.0%)
3
38,213 (16.7%)

7,657 (3.4%)

7,014 (3.1%)

1,616 (0.7%)
415 California [lower-alpha 4] 172
1,567,898 (28.0%)
221
1,987,339 (35.5%)
12
745,409 (13.3%)
9
687,364 (12.3%)

246,972 (4.4%)

125,827 (2.2%)

32,861 (0.6%)
67 Colorado [lower-alpha 4] 28
232,183 (24.7%)
25
346,766 (36.8%)
3
165,677 (17.6%)
4
175,665 (18.7%)

9,853 (1.0%)
24 Maine 13
68,396 (34.1%)
9
65,894 (32.9%)
2
31,514 (15.7%)

24,131 (12.0%)

4,180 (2.1%)

2,744 (1.4%)

1,841 (0.9%)
91 Massachusetts 45
470,294 (33.6%)
29
373,173 (26.7%)
17
299,733 (21.4%)

164,689 (11.8%)

37,172 (2.7%)

16,862 (1.2%)

10,616 (0.8%)
75 Minnesota 43
287,464 (38.6%)
27
222,530 (29.9%)
5
114,754 (15.4%)

62,064 (8.3%)

7,627 (1.0%)

41,508 (5.6%)

2,507 (0.3%)
110 North Carolina 68
568,581 (43.0%)
37
318,872 (24.1%)
2
138,502 (10.5%)
3
171,823 (13.0%)

43,368 (3.3%)

30,641 (2.3%)

6,649 (0.5%)
37 Oklahoma 21
117,552 (38.7%)
13
77,302 (25.4%)
1
40,676 (13.4%)
2
42,243 (13.9%)

5,113 (1.7%)

6,728 (2.2%)

5,106 (1.7%)
64 Tennessee 38
215,390 (41.7%)
20
129,168 (25.0%)
1
53,732 (10.4%)
5
79,789 (15.5%)

17,102 (3.3%)

10,671 (2.1%)

2,278 (0.4%)
228 Texas 111
725,562 (34.6%)
102
626,339 (29.9%)
5
239,237 (11.4%)
10
300,608 (14.4%)

82,671 (4.0%)

43,291 (2.1%)

8,688 (0.4%)
29 Utah 7
38,999 (18.5%)
16
74,478 (35.3%)
3
34,398 (16.3%)
3
33,262 (15.8%)

18,543 (8.8%)

7,519 (3.6%)

1,621 (0.8%)
16 Vermont 5
34,734 (22.0%)
11
80,121 (50.8%)

19,816 (12.6%)

14,843 (9.4%)

3,714 (2.4%)

2,023 (1.3%)

1,298 (0.8%)
99 Virginia 66
705,800 (53.2%)
31
306,024 (23.1%)
2
142,470 (10.7%)

129,784 (9.8%)

11,190 (0.8%)

8,413 (0.6%)

11,279 (0.9%)
March 3–1013 Democrats Abroad 4
9,059 (22.7%)
9
23,139 (57.9%)

5,730 (14.3%) [lower-alpha 5]

892 (2.2%) [lower-alpha 6]

616 (1.5%)

224 (0.6%)

146 (0.4%)
March 10
(352)
20 Idaho 11
52,679 (48.9%)
9
45,815 (42.5%)

2,865 (2.7%)

2,589 (2.4%)

1,405 (1.3%)

769 (0.7%)

868 (0.8%)
125 Michigan 73
838,564 (52.9%)
52
576,916 (36.4%)

26,051 (1.6%)

73,175 (4.6%)

22,374 (1.4%)

10,969 (0.7%)

9,461 (0.6%)
36 Mississippi 34
222,160 (81.0%)
2
40,657 (14.8%)

1,550 (0.6%)

6,933 (2.5%)

562 (0.2%)

440 (0.2%)

1,003 (0.4%)
68 Missouri 44
399,439 (60.1%)
24
229,638 (34.6%)

8,115 (1.2%)

9,853 (1.5%)

3,301 (0.5%)

2,677 (0.4%)

4,879 (0.7%)
14 North Dakota 6
5,742 (39.8%)
8
7,682 (53.3%)

366 (2.5%)

113 (0.8%)

164 (1.1%)

223 (1.5%)

89 (0.6%)
89 Washington 46
591,403 (37.9%)
43
570,039 (36.6%)

142,652 (9.2%)

122,530 (7.9%)

63,344 (4.1%)

33,383 (2.1%)

13,199 (0.9%)
March 146 Northern Mariana Islands 2
48 (36.4%)
4
84 (63.6%)
March 17
(441)
67 Arizona 39
260,608 (44.4%)
28
193,448 (32.9%)

35,353 (6.0%)

54,123 (9.2%)

24,782 (4.2%)

9,447 (1.6%)

2,934 (0.5%)
219 Florida 162
1,075,807 (61.9%)
57
396,506 (22.8%)

32,805 (1.9%)

146,446 (8.4%)

39,870 (2.3%)

17,267 (1.0%)

8,708 (0.5%)
155 Illinois [lower-alpha 4] 94
924,771 (59.0%)
60
565,762 (36.1%)

22,067 (1.4%)

23,809 (1.5%)

9,080 (0.6%)

0 (0%)

9,118 (0.6%)
April 784 Wisconsin 56
581,611 (62.9%)
28
293,652 (31.8%)

14,055 (1.5%)

8,965 (1.0%)

4,992 (0.5%)

6,063 (0.7%)

5,661 (0.6%)
April 1015 Alaska [lower-alpha 7] 8
10,834 (55.3%)
7
8,755 (44.7%)
April 1714 Wyoming [lower-alpha 7] 10
10,912 (72.2%)
4
4,206 (27.8%)
April 28136 Ohio [lower-alpha 7] 115
623,186 (72.4%)
21
142,906 (16.6%)

29,614 (3.4%)

28,247 (3.3%)

14,648 (1.7%)

11,710 (1.4%)

4,504 (0.5%)
May 239 Kansas [lower-alpha 7] 29
110,041 (76.9%)
10
33,142 (23.1%)
May 1229 Nebraska 29
119,138 (77.4%)

20,921 (13.6%)

9,531 (6.2%)

4,318 (2.8%)
May 1961 Oregon [lower-alpha 4] 46
401,732 (66.2%)
15
123,686 (20.4%)

58,045 (9.6%)

10,498 (1.7%)
May 2224 Hawaii [lower-alpha 7] 16
21,215 (63.2%)
8
12,337 (36.8%)
June 2
(479)
20 District of Columbia
82 Indiana
96 Maryland
19 Montana
34 New Mexico
186 Pennsylvania
26 Rhode Island
16 South Dakota
June 67 US Virgin Islands
June 9
(133)
105 Georgia
28 West Virginia
June 23
(328)
54 Kentucky
274 New York
July 7
(147)
21 Delaware
126 New Jersey
July 1154 Louisiana
July 1251 Puerto Rico
August 1160 Connecticut
TBA7 Guam
Total
3,979 pledged delegates
1,5661,00758432172

Election day postponements and cancellations

2020 Democratic presidential primary and caucus calendar.svg

  February  March 3 (Super Tuesday)  March 10  March 14–17  March 24–29  April 4–7  April 28  May  June

2020 Democratic presidential primary and caucus calendar rescheduled.svg

  February  March 3 (Super Tuesday)  March 10  March 14–17  April 7–17  April 26–28  May  June–August

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, a number of presidential primaries were rescheduled. Some have also cancelled in-person voting entirely. On April 27, New York cancelled its voting by mail as well on the grounds that there was only one candidate left with an active campaign. Andrew Yang responded with a lawsuit, arguing that the decision infringes on voting rights, [52] and in early May, the judge ruled in favor of Yang. [53]

2020 Democratic primaries altered due to coronavirus
PrimaryOriginal
schedule
Altered
schedule
Vote in
person?
Last
changed
Ref.
Ohio March 17April 28 [lower-alpha 8] CancelledMarch 25 [54] [55]
Georgia March 24June 9ScheduledApril 9 [56] [57]
Puerto Rico March 29July 12TBAMay 21 [58] [59] [60]
Alaska April 4April 10 [lower-alpha 9] CancelledMarch 23 [61]
Wyoming April 4April 17 [lower-alpha 10] CancelledMarch 22 [62]
Hawaii April 4May 22 [lower-alpha 11] CancelledMarch 27 [63] [64] [65]
Louisiana April 4July 11 [lower-alpha 12] ScheduledApril 14 [66] [67]
Maryland April 28June 2ScheduledMarch 17 [68]
Pennsylvania April 28June 2ScheduledMarch 27 [69]
Rhode Island April 28June 2ScheduledMarch 23 [70]
New York April 28June 23ScheduledApril 27 [71] [72] [73]
Delaware April 28July 7ScheduledMay 7 [74] [75]
Connecticut April 28August 11ScheduledApril 17 [76]
Kansas May 2May 2 [lower-alpha 13] CancelledMarch 30 [77]
Guam May 2TBD [lower-alpha 14] TBAMay 2 [78] [ better source needed ]
Indiana May 5June 2ScheduledMarch 20 [79]
West Virginia May 12June 9ScheduledApril 1 [80]
Kentucky May 19June 23ScheduledMarch 16 [81]
New Jersey June 2July 7 [lower-alpha 15] ScheduledApril 8 [82]

In addition, the DNC elected to delay the 2020 Democratic National Convention from July 13–16 to August 17–20. [83]

Candidates

Major candidates in the 2020 Democratic presidential primaries have either: (a) served as vice president, a member of the cabinet, a U.S. senator, a U.S. representative, or a governor, (b) been included in a minimum of five independent national polls, or (c) received substantial media coverage. As of April 8,2020, one major candidate is still in the race.

Nearly 300 candidates who did not meet the criteria to be deemed "major" also filed with the Federal Election Commission to run for president in the Democratic Party primary. [84]

Presumptive nominee

CandidateBornExperienceStateCampaign announcedPledged delegates [85] Popular vote [86] Contests wonArticleRef.
November 20, 1942
(age 77)
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Vice President of the United States (2009–2017)
U.S. senator from Delaware (1973–2009)
Candidate for President in 1988 and 2008
April 25, 20191,56612,110,973
(43.65%)
27
(AL, AK, AZ, AR, FL, HI, ID, IL, KS, ME, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, NE, NC, OH, OK, OR, SC, TN, TX, VA, WA, WI, WY)
[87]

Withdrew during the primaries

CandidateBornExperienceStateCampaign announcedCampaign suspendedDelegates won [85] Popular voteContests wonArticleRef.
September 8, 1941
(age 78)
Brooklyn, New York
U.S. senator from Vermont (2007–present)
U.S. representative from VT-AL (1991–2007)
Candidate for President in 2016
February 19, 2019April 8, 2020
(endorsed Biden) [88]
1,0078,426,458
(30.37%)
9
(CA, CO, DA, NV, NH, ND, MP, UT, VT)
[89] [90]
April 12, 1981
(age 39)
Leloaloa, American Samoa
U.S. representative from HI-02 (2013–present)January 11, 2019March 19, 2020
(endorsed Biden) [91]
2190,933
(0.69%)
0 [92] [93]
June 22, 1949
(age 70)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
U.S. senator from Massachusetts (2013–present)February 9, 2019
Exploratory committee: December 31, 2018
March 5, 2020
(endorsed Biden) [94]
582,605,580
(9.39%)
0 [95] [96]
February 14, 1942
(age 78)
Boston, Massachusetts
Mayor of New York City, New York (2002–2013)
CEO of Bloomberg L.P.
November 24, 2019
Exploratory committee: November 21, 2019
March 4, 2020
(endorsed Biden) [97]
432,420,660
(8.72%)
1
(AS)
Mike Bloomberg 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[98] [99]
May 25, 1960
(age 60)
Plymouth, Minnesota
U.S. senator from Minnesota (2007–present)February 10, 2019March 2, 2020
(endorsed Biden) [100]
7494,695
(1.78%)
0 [101] [100]
January 19, 1982
(age 38)
South Bend, Indiana
Mayor of South Bend, Indiana (2012–2020)April 14, 2019
Exploratory committee: January 23, 2019
March 1, 2020
(endorsed Biden) [102]
21854,378
(3.08%)
1
(IA)
Pete for America logo (Strato Blue).svg
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[103] [104]
June 27, 1957
(age 62)
Manhattan, New York
Hedge fund manager
Founder of Farallon Capital and Beneficial State Bank
July 9, 2019February 29, 2020
(endorsed Biden) [105]
0248,807
(0.90%)
0 Tom Steyer 2020 logo (black text).svg
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[106] [107]
July 31, 1956
(age 63)
Chicago, Illinois
Governor of Massachusetts (2007–2015)November 14, 2019February 12, 2020
(endorsed Biden) [108]
019,574
(0.07%)
0 Devallogo2020.png
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[109] [110]
November 28, 1964
(age 55)
New Delhi, India
U.S. senator from Colorado (2009–present)May 2, 2019February 11, 2020
(endorsed Biden) [111]
042,261
(0.15%)
0 Michael Bennet 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[112] [113]
January 13, 1975
(age 45)
Schenectady, New York
Entrepreneur
Founder of Venture for America
November 6, 2017February 11, 2020
(endorsed Biden) [114]
0108,086
(0.39%)
0 Andrew Yang 2020 logo.svg
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[115] [116]

Other notable individuals who did not meet the criteria to become major candidates also terminated their campaigns during the primaries:

Other notable individuals who did not meet the criteria to become major candidates but still have active campaigns include:

Withdrew before the primaries

CandidateBornExperienceStateCampaign
announced
Campaign
suspended
Popular voteArticleRef.
April 16, 1963
(age 57)
Wood-Ridge, New Jersey
U.S. representative from MD-06 (2013–2019)July 28, 2017January 31, 2020
(endorsed Biden) [121]
15,919 John Delaney 2020 logo.svg
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[122] [123]
April 27, 1969
(age 51)
Washington, D.C.
U.S. senator from New Jersey (2013–present)
Mayor of Newark, New Jersey (2006–2013)
February 1, 2019January 13, 2020
(running for re-election) [124]
(endorsed Biden) [125]
28,811 Cory Booker 2020 Logo.svg
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[126] [127]
July 8, 1952
(age 67)
Houston, Texas
Author
Founder of Project Angel Food
Independent candidate for U.S. House from CA-33 in 2014
January 28, 2019
Exploratory committee:
November 15, 2018
January 10, 2020
(endorsed Sanders) [128]
21,437 Marianne Williamson 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[129] [130]
September 16, 1974
(age 45)
San Antonio, Texas
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (2014–2017)
Mayor of San Antonio, Texas (2009–2014)
January 12, 2019
Exploratory committee: December 12, 2018
January 2, 2020
(endorsed Warren, then Biden) [131] [132]
36,277 [133] [134]
October 20, 1964
(age 55)
Oakland, California
U.S. senator from California (2017–present)
Attorney General of California (2011–2017)
January 21, 2019December 3, 2019
(endorsed Biden) [135]
844 Kamala Harris 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[136] [137]
April 11, 1966
(age 54)
Missoula, Montana
Governor of Montana (2013–present)
Attorney General of Montana (2009–2013)
May 14, 2019December 2, 2019
(running for U.S. Senate) [138]
549 Steve Bullock 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[139] [140]
December 12, 1951
(age 68)
Secane, Pennsylvania
U.S. representative from PA-07 (2007–2011)
Former Vice Admiral of the United States Navy
June 23, 2019December 1, 2019
(endorsed Klobuchar) [141]
5,251 Campaign
FEC filing
[142] [143]
June 7, 1974
(age 45)
South Bay, Florida
Mayor of Miramar, Florida (2015–present)March 28, 2019
Exploratory committee: March 13, 2019
November 19, 20190 [lower-alpha 16] [144] [145]
September 26, 1972
(age 47)
El Paso, Texas
U.S. representative from TX-16 (2013–2019)March 14, 2019November 1, 2019
(endorsed Biden) [146]
1 [lower-alpha 16] [147] [148] [149]
July 16, 1973
(age 46)
Niles, Ohio
U.S. representative from OH-13 (2013–present)
U.S. representative from OH-17 (2003–2013)
April 4, 2019October 24, 2019
(running for re-election) [150]
(endorsed Biden)
[151]
0 [lower-alpha 16] Timryan2020.png
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[152] [153]
May 8, 1961
(age 59)
Manhattan, New York
Mayor of New York City, New York (2014–present)May 16, 2019September 20, 2019
(endorsed Sanders) [154]
0 [lower-alpha 16] [155] [156]
December 9, 1966
(age 53)
Albany, New York
U.S. senator from New York (2009–present)
U.S. representative from NY-20 (2007–2009)
March 17, 2019
Exploratory committee: January 15, 2019
August 28, 2019
(endorsed Biden) [157]
0 [lower-alpha 16] Gillibrand 2020 logo.png
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[158] [159]
October 24, 1978
(age 41)
Salem, Massachusetts
U.S. representative from MA-06 (2015–present)April 22, 2019August 23, 2019
(running for re-election) [160]
(endorsed Biden) [161]
0 [lower-alpha 16] Seth Moulton 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[162] [163]
February 9, 1951
(age 69)
Seattle, Washington
Governor of Washington (2013–present)
U.S. representative from WA-01 (1999–2012)
U.S. representative from WA-04 (1993–1995)
March 1, 2019August 21, 2019
(running for re-election) [164]
(endorsed Biden) [165]
1 [lower-alpha 16] [166] Jay Inslee 2020 logo3.png
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[167] [168]
February 7, 1952
(age 68)
Narberth, Pennsylvania
Governor of Colorado (2011–2019)
Mayor of Denver, Colorado (2003–2011)
March 4, 2019August 15, 2019
(running for U.S. Senate) [169]
(endorsed Bennet) [170]
1 [lower-alpha 16] [166] John Hickenlooper 2020 presidential campaign logo.png
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[171] [172]
May 13, 1930
(age 90)
Springfield, Massachusetts
U.S. senator from Alaska (1969–1981)
Candidate for President in 2008
Candidate for Vice President in 1972
April 2, 2019
Exploratory committee: March 19, 2019
August 6, 2019
(endorsed Gabbard and Sanders, then Howie Hawkins) [173] [174] [ better source needed ]
0 [lower-alpha 16] Gravel Mg web logo line two color.svg
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[175] [173]
November 16, 1980
(age 39)
Sac City, Iowa
U.S. representative from CA-15 (2013–present)April 8, 2019July 8, 2019 [176]
(running for re-election)
0 [lower-alpha 16] Eric Swalwell 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
__________
Campaign
FEC filing
[177] [178]
September 25, 1970
(age 49)
Rochester, Minnesota
West Virginia state senator from WV-SD07 (2016–2019)November 11, 2018January 25, 2019
(running for U.S. Senate) [179]
(endorsed Biden) [180]
0 [lower-alpha 16]

Campaign
FEC filing

[181] [182]

The following notable individuals who did not meet the criteria to become major candidates also terminated their campaigns before the primaries:

Political positions

Debates and forums

In December 2018, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) announced the preliminary schedule for 12 official DNC-sanctioned debates, set to begin in June 2019, with six debates in 2019 and the remaining six during the first four months of 2020. Candidates are allowed to participate in forums featuring multiple other candidates as long as only one candidate appears on stage at a time; if candidates participate in any unsanctioned debate with other presidential candidates, they will lose their invitation to the next DNC-sanctioned debate. [191] [192]

The DNC also announced that it would not partner with Fox News as a media sponsor for any debates. [193] [194] Fox News had last held a Democratic debate in 2003. [195] All media sponsors selected to host a debate will as a new rule be required to appoint at least one female moderator for each debate, to ensure there will not be a gender-skewed treatment of the candidates and debate topics. [196]

Debate schedule
DebateDateTime
(ET)
ViewersLocationSponsor(s)Moderator(s)
1A June 26, 20199–11 p.m.~24.3 million
(15.3m live TV; 9m streaming) [197]
Arsht Center,
Miami, Florida [198]
NBC News
MSNBC
Telemundo
Jose Diaz-Balart
Savannah Guthrie
Lester Holt
Rachel Maddow
Chuck Todd [199]
1BJune 27, 20199–11 p.m.~27.1 million
(18.1m live TV; 9m streaming) [200]
2A July 30, 20198–10:30 p.m.~11.5 million
(8.7m live TV; 2.8m streaming)
Fox Theatre,
Detroit, Michigan [201]
CNN Dana Bash
Don Lemon
Jake Tapper [202]
2BJuly 31, 2019 [203] 8–10:30 p.m.~13.8 million
(10.7m live TV; 3.1m streaming) [204]
3 September 12, 20198–11 p.m.14.04 million live TV [205] Health and Physical Education Arena,
Texas Southern University,
Houston, Texas [206]
ABC News
Univision
Linsey Davis
David Muir
Jorge Ramos
George Stephanopoulos [207]
4 October 15, 2019 [208] 8–11 p.m.~8.8 million
(8.34m live TV; 0.45m streaming) [209]
Rike Physical Education Center,
Otterbein University,
Westerville, Ohio
CNN
The New York Times [210]
Erin Burnett
Anderson Cooper
Marc Lacey [211]
5 November 20, 2019 [212] 9–11 p.m.~7.9 million
(6.6m live TV; 1.3m streaming) [213]
Oprah Winfrey sound stage,
Tyler Perry Studios,
Atlanta, Georgia [214]
MSNBC
The Washington Post
Rachel Maddow
Andrea Mitchell
Ashley Parker
Kristen Welker [215]
6 December 19, 20198–11 p.m. [216] ~14.6 million
(6.17m live TV; 8.4m streaming) [217]
Gersten Pavilion,
Loyola Marymount University,
Los Angeles, California [218]
PBS
Politico
Tim Alberta
Yamiche Alcindor
Amna Nawaz
Judy Woodruff [219]
7 January 14, 20209–11:15 p.m. [220] ~11.3 million
(7.3m live TV; 4.0m streaming) [221]
Sheslow Auditorium,
Drake University,
Des Moines, Iowa [222] [223]
CNN
The Des Moines Register
Wolf Blitzer
Brianne Pfannenstiel
Abby Phillip [224]
8 February 7, 20208–10:30 p.m. [225] ~11.0 million
(7.8m live TV; 3.2m streaming) [226]
Thomas F. Sullivan Arena,
Saint Anselm College,
Manchester, New Hampshire [222] [227]
ABC News
WMUR-TV
Apple News
Linsey Davis
Monica Hernandez
David Muir
Adam Sexton
George Stephanopoulos [225]
9 February 19, 20209–11 p.m. [228] ~33.16 million
(19.66m live TV; 13.5m streaming) [229] [230] [231]
Le Théâtre des Arts,
Paris Las Vegas,
Paradise, Nevada [228]
NBC News
MSNBC
Telemundo
The Nevada Independent
Vanessa Hauc
Lester Holt
Hallie Jackson
Jon Ralston
Chuck Todd [228]
10 February 25, 20208–10 p.m. [232] ~30.4 million
(15.3m live TV; 15.1m streaming) [233]
Gaillard Center,
Charleston, South Carolina [222]
CBS News
BET
Twitter
Congressional Black Caucus Institute [234]
Margaret Brennan
Major Garrett
Gayle King
Norah O'Donnell
Bill Whitaker [234]
11 March 15, 20208–10 p.m. [235] ~11.4 million
(10.8m live TV; 0.6m streaming) [236]
CNN studio
Washington, D.C. [237]
CNN
Univision
Congressional Hispanic Caucus BOLD
Dana Bash
Ilia Calderón
Jake Tapper [237]

Primary election polling

The following graph depicts the standing of each candidate in the poll aggregators from December 2018 to April 2020.

Polling aggregates
Active candidates
     Joe Biden
     Others/Undecided
Withdrawn candidates
    Bernie Sanders
    Tulsi Gabbard
    Elizabeth Warren
    Michael Bloomberg
    Amy Klobuchar
    Pete Buttigieg
    Andrew Yang
    Cory Booker
    Kamala Harris
    Beto O'Rourke
Events
     Debates
     Caucuses and primaries
     National coronavirus
emergency declared
2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries
Polling aggregates
Source of poll aggregationDate updatedDates polled Biden Sanders
(withdrawn)
Undecided [lower-alpha 17]
270toWin Apr 25, 2020Mar 18–Apr 8, 2020 [lower-alpha 18] 57.2%36.6%
FiveThirtyEight Apr 15, 2020Mar 30–Apr 14, 2020 [lower-alpha 19] 54.1%
RealClear Politics Apr 28, 2020Mar 24–Apr 7, 202060.8%32.0%7.7%
Average57.4%

Timeline

Richard Ojeda 2020 presidential campaignEric Swalwell 2020 presidential campaignMike Gravel 2020 presidential campaignJohn Hickenlooper 2020 presidential campaignJay Inslee 2020 presidential campaignSeth Moulton 2020 presidential campaignKirsten Gillibrand 2020 presidential campaignBill de Blasio 2020 presidential campaignTim Ryan 2020 presidential campaignBeto O'Rourke 2020 presidential campaignWayne Messam 2020 presidential campaignJoe Sestak 2020 presidential campaignSteve Bullock 2020 presidential campaignKamala Harris 2020 presidential campaignJulián Castro 2020 presidential campaignMarianne Williamson 2020 presidential campaignCory Booker 2020 presidential campaignJohn Delaney 2020 presidential campaignAndrew Yang 2020 presidential campaignMichael Bennet 2020 presidential campaignDeval Patrick 2020 presidential campaignTom Steyer 2020 presidential campaignPete Buttigieg 2020 presidential campaignAmy Klobuchar 2020 presidential campaignMichael Bloomberg 2020 presidential campaignElizabeth Warren 2020 presidential campaignTulsi Gabbard 2020 presidential campaignBernie Sanders 2020 presidential campaignJoe Biden 2020 presidential campaign2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries
Presumptive
nominee
Exploratory
committee
Suspended
campaign
Midterm
elections
Iowa
caucuses
New Hampshire
primary
Super
Tuesday
National emergency
declared due to
coronavirus
Wisconsin primary
General
election

2017

John Delaney (46743402692).jpg
Rep. John Delaney was the first major candidate to announce his campaign, two and a half years before the 2020 Iowa caucus.
Andrew Yang (48571517517).jpg
Entrepreneur Andrew Yang was the second major Democratic candidate to announce his campaign.
Tulsi Gabbard (48011616441).jpg
Rep. Tulsi Gabbard became the first major female candidate to announce her candidacy on January 11, 2019.
Kamala Harris announcing her candidacy for presidency.png
Sen. Kamala Harris launched her bid on January 21, 2019.
Cory Booker (48021663307).jpg
Sen. Cory Booker launched his bid on February 1, 2019.
Announcement Day - Lawrence, MA - 47108769091 (1).jpg
Sen. Elizabeth Warren launched her bid on February 9, 2019.
Amy Klobuchar (46330784464) (cropped).jpg
Sen. Amy Klobuchar launched her bid on February 10, 2019.
Bernie Sanders (48235588017).jpg
Sen. Bernie Sanders launched his second campaign on February 19, 2019.
Jay Inslee (48609760062).jpg
Governor Jay Inslee launched his presidential bid on March 1, 2019, becoming the first incumbent governor to do so.
Beto O'Rourke in Cleveland (40456935723).jpg
Former Rep. Beto O'Rourke launched his bid on March 14, 2019.
PeteButtigieg2020SBI.jpg
Mayor Pete Buttigieg launched his bid on April 14, 2019.

In the weeks following the election of Donald Trump in the 2016 election, media speculation regarding potential candidates for the 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries began to circulate. As the Senate began confirmation hearings for members of the cabinet, speculation centered on the prospects of the "hell-no caucus", six senators who went on to vote against the majority of Trump's nominees. According to Politico, the members of the "hell-no caucus" were Cory Booker, Kamala Harris, Kirsten Gillibrand, Bernie Sanders, Jeff Merkley, and Elizabeth Warren. [238] [239] Other speculation centered on then-Vice-President Joe Biden making a third presidential bid following failed attempts in 1988 and 2008. [240]

2018

In August 2018, Democratic Party officials and television networks began discussions as to the nature and scheduling of the following year's debates and the nomination process. [243] Changes were made to the role of superdelegates, deciding to allow them to vote on the first ballot only if the nomination is uncontested. [244] The Democratic National Committee (DNC) announced the preliminary schedule for the 12 official DNC-sanctioned debates, set to begin in June 2019, with six debates in 2019 and the remaining six during the first four months of 2020.

November 2018

December 2018

2019

Joe Biden kickoff rally May 2019.jpg
Former Vice President Joe Biden launched his third campaign on April 25, 2019.
Eric Swalwell (48016366662).jpg
Rep. Eric Swalwell became the first representative to suspend their campaign following the first debate on July 8, 2019.
Steyer2 (48907647822).jpg
Billionaire hedge fund manager Tom Steyer launched his campaign on July 9, 2019.
John Hickenlooper (48589565821).jpg
Former Governor John Hickenlooper suspended his campaign on August 15, 2019 and subsequently launched a bid for the United States Senate. He later endorsed Michael Bennet.
Kirsten Gillibrand (48563631611).jpg
Kirsten Gillibrand became the first incumbent Senator and first female major candidate to suspend her campaign on August 28, 2019.
Bill de Blasio (48609239938).jpg
Mayor Bill de Blasio suspended his campaign on September 20, 2019 and endorsed Bernie Sanders after the New Hampshire primary.
Tim Ryan (48582715861).jpg
Rep. Tim Ryan suspended his campaign on October 24, 2019 and subsequently endorsed Joe Biden.
Michael Bloomberg (48604023932).jpg
Former Mayor Michael Bloomberg launched his campaign via video on November 24, 2019.
Steve Bullock - 48261163227.jpg
Governor Steve Bullock suspended his campaign and declined to run for the United States Senate on December 2, 2019. He later reversed his decision and challenged Senator Steve Daines after meeting with Barack Obama and Chuck Schumer.
Julian Castro (47696430842).jpg
Former HUD Secretary Julian Castro suspended his campaign on January 2, 2020 and subsequently endorsed Elizabeth Warren.
Marianne Williamson (48541662667).jpg
Spiritual author Marianne Williamson suspended her campaign on January 10, 2020 and subsequently endorsed Bernie Sanders.
Michael Bennet (48641062713).jpg
Sen. Michael Bennet suspended his campaign on February 11, 2020, after the polls closed in the New Hampshire primary.
Chamber of Commerce Breakfast (16580720990).jpg
Former Governor Deval Patrick suspended his campaign on February 12, 2020, prior to the Nevada caucus.
Michael Bloomberg (49474987843).jpg
Former Mayor Michael Bloomberg suspended his campaign on March 4, 2020 after a distant third place finish on Super Tuesday.

January 2019

February 2019

March 2019

April 2019

May 2019

June 2019

July 2019

August 2019

September 2019

October 2019

November 2019

December 2019

2020

January 2020

  • January 2: Julián Castro dropped out of the race. [331] He later endorsed Elizabeth Warren's campaign. [131]
  • January 10: Marianne Williamson dropped out of the race. [130] She later endorsed Bernie Sanders' campaign. [128]
  • January 13: Cory Booker dropped out of the race. [332]
  • January 14: The seventh Democratic debate took place in Des Moines, Iowa, at Drake University. [222]
  • January 17: The first votes were cast as no-excuse, in-person absentee voting in the Minnesota primary began. [333]
  • January 31: John Delaney dropped out of the race. [334]

February 2020

  • February 3: The Iowa caucuses took place, but inconsistencies reported in the caucus results delayed reporting of the outcome. [335] [336]
  • February 4–7: Results were released in the Iowa caucuses. The reporting delays, errors, and inconsistencies surrounding the caucuses prompted DNC Chairman Tom Perez to call for a recanvass. As of February 18,2020, Sanders won a plurality of first-instance and final votes, while the lead in state delegate equivalents was disputed between Sanders and Buttigieg. [337] Warren came in third, and Biden fourth.
  • February 7: The eighth Democratic debate took place in Goffstown, New Hampshire at St. Anselm College. [222]
  • February 11: New Hampshire primary
    • Bernie Sanders was announced as the winner of the New Hampshire primary, with 26% of the vote. [338] Buttigieg (24%, 2nd) and Klobuchar (20%, 3rd) were the only other candidates to receive delegates; Warren (9%, 4th) and Biden (8%, 5th) finished below the delegate threshold. [339]
    • Michael Bennet and Andrew Yang dropped out of the race. [340] [341]
  • February 12: Deval Patrick dropped out of the race. [110]
  • February 14: Bill de Blasio endorsed Bernie Sanders. [342]
  • February 15–17: The Moving America Forward Infrastructure Forum was held at University of Nevada, Las Vegas, by the IUOE, ASCE, TWUA, ARTBA, APTA, AEM, and other groups. Infrastructure policy was discussed, with a focus on transportation, water, and broadband issues. [343]
  • February 19: The ninth Democratic debate took place in Las Vegas, Nevada. [222]
  • February 21: Voting in the Washington primary began. [344]
  • February 22: Nevada caucuses
    • With almost 47% of the county convention delegates, Bernie Sanders was announced as the winner of the Nevada caucuses. [345] Joe Biden finished second (20%), Pete Buttigieg finished third (14%), Elizabeth Warren finished fourth (10%), and Tom Steyer finished fifth (5%). [346]
  • February 24: Voting in the Colorado primary began. [347]
    • Marianne Williamson endorsed Bernie Sanders. [348]
  • February 25: The tenth Democratic debate took place in Charleston, South Carolina at the Gaillard Center. [222]
  • February 29: South Carolina primary
    • With 48% of the popular vote, Joe Biden was announced as the winner of the South Carolina primary. [349] Bernie Sanders came in second (20%), with Tom Steyer (3rd, 11%), Pete Buttigieg (4th, 8%), and Elizabeth Warren (5th, 7%) rounding out the top five. [350]
    • Tom Steyer dropped out of the race. [351]

March 2020

  • March 1: Pete Buttigieg dropped out of the race. [352]
  • March 2: Amy Klobuchar dropped out of the race. [353]
    • That evening, Biden received the endorsements of Buttigieg, Klobuchar, and Beto O'Rourke during a rally in Texas. [354]
  • March 3: Super Tuesday: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont and Virginia primaries; American Samoa caucus.
    • Biden won Alabama, Arkansas, Massachusetts, Maine, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia.
    • Bloomberg won American Samoa.
    • Sanders won California, Colorado, Utah, and Vermont.
    • Voting in the Democrats Abroad primary began. [355]
  • March 4: Michael Bloomberg dropped out of the race, endorsing Biden. [356]
  • March 5: Elizabeth Warren dropped out of the race. [357]
  • March 6: John Delaney endorsed Joe Biden. [358]
  • March 8: Kamala Harris endorsed Joe Biden. [359]
  • March 9: Cory Booker endorsed Joe Biden. [360]
  • March 10: Idaho, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri and Washington primaries; North Dakota caucus.
    • Biden won Idaho, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, and Washington.
    • Sanders won North Dakota.
    • Andrew Yang endorsed Joe Biden. [361]
  • March 13: A national emergency was declared due to the coronavirus pandemic. [362] Following this, several presidential primaries were rescheduled (including Kentucky [363] and Louisiana [364] ), and candidates limited in-person events.
  • March 14: Sanders won Northern Mariana Islands. [365]
  • March 15: The eleventh Democratic debate, originally scheduled to take place in Phoenix, Arizona, [366] took place in Washington, D.C. due to coronavirus concerns. [367] [368]
  • March 16: Ohio announced that it intended to postpone its presidential primary, a plan that was struck down by a judge that same day. [369] Following the judge's decision, Governor DeWine announced that polls would be closed by order of Ohio Health Director Amy Acton due to a "health emergency." State officials will seek to extend the voting process. [370]
  • March 17: Arizona, Florida, and Illinois primaries. [370]
    • Biden won Arizona, Florida, [371] and Illinois. [372]
  • March 19: Tulsi Gabbard dropped out of the race, endorsing Biden. [373] Connecticut rescheduled its primary from April 28 to June 2. [374]
  • March 23: Sanders won Democrats Abroad. [375]
  • March 28: The New York primary was rescheduled from April 28 to June 23 due to coronavirus concerns. [376]

April 2020

  • April 7: Wisconsin primary
  • April 8:
    • Bernie Sanders dropped out of the race, and Joe Biden became the presumptive presidential nominee. [377]
    • The New Jersey primary was moved from June 2 to July 7 due to coronavirus concerns. [82]
  • April 10: Mail-in voting period ends for Alaska party-run primary.
  • April 11: Biden won Alaska. [378]
  • April 13:
    • Bernie Sanders endorsed Biden. [379]
    • Biden won Wisconsin. [380]
  • April 14:
    • Former President Barack Obama endorsed Biden. [381]
    • Louisiana rescheduled its primary election for the second time, moving the date from June 20 to July 11. [67]
  • April 15: Elizabeth Warren endorsed Biden. [382]
  • April 17: Mail-in voting period ends for Wyoming caucus. Connecticut rescheduled its primary for a second time, from June 2 to August 11. [76]
  • April 19: Biden won Wyoming. [383]
  • April 22: Jay Inslee endorsed Biden. [384]
  • April 27:
  • April 28:
  • April 29: Voting for the Oregon primary begins. [389]
  • April 30: Biden announced his vice presidential selection committee. [390]

May 2020

June 2020

  • June 2: District of Columbia, Indiana, Maryland, Montana, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and South Dakota primaries
  • June 6: Virgin Islands caucuses
  • June 9: Georgia and West Virginia primaries
  • June 23: Kentucky and New York primaries

July 2020

  • July 7: Delaware and New Jersey primaries
  • July 11: Louisiana primary
  • July 12: Puerto Rico primary

August 2020

Ballot access

Filing for the primaries began in October 2019. [397] [398] Green check.svg indicates that the candidate is on the ballot for the primary contest, Check.svg indicates that the candidate is a recognized write-in candidate, and Dark Red x.svg indicates that the candidate will not appear on the ballot in that state's contest. Yellow check.svg indicates that a candidate withdrew before the election but is still listed on the ballot.

Primaries and caucuses
State/
Territory
Date
Biden
Sanders
Gabbard
Warren
Bloomberg
Klobuchar
Buttigieg
Steyer
Patrick
Bennet
Yang
Other
Ref
IA [lower-roman 1] Feb 3Ballot access not required [399]
NH Feb 11Green check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgCheck.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg [upper-alpha 1] [119] [400]
NV [lower-roman 1] Feb 22Green check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgDark Red x.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgYellow check.svgYellow check.svgYellow check.svgYellow check.svg [upper-alpha 2] [401]
SC Feb 29Green check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgDark Red x.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg