1988 Democratic National Convention

Last updated
1988 Democratic National Convention
1988 presidential election
1988 Dukakis.jpg Lloyd Bentsen crop.jpg
Nominees
Dukakis and Bentsen
Convention
Date(s)July 18–21, 1988
City Atlanta, Georgia
Venue The Omni
Keynote speaker Ann Richards
Notable speakers Ted Kennedy
Bill Clinton
Jim Hightower
Jimmy Carter
Walter Mondale
George McGovern
Jesse Jackson
Candidates
Presidential nominee Michael Dukakis of Massachusetts
Vice Presidential nominee Lloyd Bentsen of Texas
Voting
Total delegates4,105
Votes needed for nomination2,054
Results (President) Dukakis (MA): 2,877 (70.09%)
Jackson (DC): 1,219 (29.70%)
Stallings (ID): 3 (0.07%)
Biden (DE): 2 (0.05%)
Gephardt (MO): 2 (0.05%)
Bentsen (TX): 1 (0.02%)
Hart (CO): 1 (0.02%)
Ballots1
1984   ·  1992

The 1988 National Convention of the U.S. Democratic Party was held at The Omni in Atlanta, Georgia, from July 18–July 21, 1988, to select candidates for the 1988 presidential election. At the convention Governor Michael Dukakis of Massachusetts was nominated for President and Senator Lloyd Bentsen of Texas for Vice President. The chair of the convention was Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Jim Wright.

Democratic Party (United States) Major political party in the United States

The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with its rival, the Republican Party. Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest active political party.

Michael Dukakis American politician

Michael Stanley Dukakis is a retired American politician who served as the 65th Governor of Massachusetts, from 1975 to 1979 and again from 1983 to 1991. He is the longest-serving governor in Massachusetts history and only the second Greek-American governor in U.S. history, after Spiro Agnew. He was nominated by the Democratic Party for president in the 1988 election, losing to the Republican candidate, Vice President George H. W. Bush.

Massachusetts State of the United States of America

Massachusetts, officially the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England region of the northeastern United States. It borders on the Atlantic Ocean to the east, the states of Connecticut and Rhode Island to the south, New Hampshire and Vermont to the north, and New York to the west. The state is named after the Massachusett tribe, which once inhabited the east side of the area, and is one of the original thirteen states. The capital of Massachusetts is Boston, which is also the most populous city in New England. Over 80% of Massachusetts's population lives in the Greater Boston metropolitan area, a region influential upon American history, academia, and industry. Originally dependent on agriculture, fishing and trade, Massachusetts was transformed into a manufacturing center during the Industrial Revolution. During the 20th century, Massachusetts's economy shifted from manufacturing to services. Modern Massachusetts is a global leader in biotechnology, engineering, higher education, finance, and maritime trade.

Contents

Speakers

The Omni was the site of the 1988 Democratic National Convention Omni Coliseum 1977.jpg
The Omni was the site of the 1988 Democratic National Convention

Speakers at the convention included Texas State Treasurer Ann Richards, who gave a keynote speech that put her in the public spotlight and included the line that George H.W. Bush was "born with a silver foot in his mouth". This speech was listed as #38 in American Rhetoric's Top 100 Speeches of the 20th Century. [1] Arkansas governor Bill Clinton gave a widely jeered nomination speech on the opening night that some predicted would ruin his political career, [2] a source of much satisfaction to him 4 years later when he was elected the 42nd President of the United States.[ citation needed ] Massachusetts senator Ted Kennedy's remarks contained the iteration "Where was George?", and Texas Agriculture Commissioner Jim Hightower called Bush "a toothache of a man."

Texas State Treasurer was an elected constitutional officer in the executive branch of the state government of Texas, responsible for overseeing the financial operations of state government. The position was established in the Constitution of 1876. It was abolished in 1996.

Ann Richards American politician, democrat

Dorothy Ann Willis Richards was an American politician and 45th Governor of Texas (1991–95). A Democrat, she first came to national attention as the Texas State Treasurer, when she delivered the keynote address at the 1988 Democratic National Convention. Richards was the second female governor of Texas and was frequently noted in the media for her outspoken feminism and her one-liners.

Arkansas State of the United States of America

Arkansas is a state in the southern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2018. Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians. The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta.

In one of the subsequent presidential debates, when questioned about the general alleged "negativity" of the campaign, Bush cited the ad hominem attacks against him at the Convention as the root cause.

Production

The organizers for the convention chose pastel colors as a background in the belief that they would appear better on television. They were patterned after the colors of the American flag in salmon, azure, and eggshell. [3] Republicans mocked the choice and used it to buttress their case that the Democrats were "soft" on the issues. [4] New Jersey governor Thomas Kean claimed at the Republican Convention that "The Dukakis Democrats will try to talk tough, but don't be fooled. They may try to talk like Dirty Harry, but they will still act like Pee Wee Herman." Kean continued that Democrats and Republicans alike "have no use for pastel patriotism... The liberal Democrats are trying to hide more than the colors in our flag; they are trying to hide their true colors." [3]

Salmon (color) color

Salmon is a range of pale pinkish-orange to light pink colors, named after the color of salmon flesh. In Australia salmon is mostly orange.

Azure (color) colour

Azure is a bright cyan-blue color that is often described as the color of the sky on a clear day.

The color eggshell is meant as a representation of the average color of a chicken egg. Since the color of chicken eggs may vary between pale brown and white, the color is an average between those two, closer to white than pale brown, because more chicken eggs are white.

The theme song for the convention was composed and performed by longtime supporter and folksinger Carly Simon. Entitled Turn of the Tide, this B-side of the hit single Let the River Run from the 20th Century Fox motion picture Working Girl was subsequently used a few weeks later in the U.S./Russian co-production of Marlo Thomas' and Tatiana Vedeneyeva's Emmy-award-winning ABC television special Free to Be... a Family and was subsequently released on the best selling soundtrack album.

Carly Simon American singer-songwriter, musician and author

Carly Elisabeth Simon is an American singer-songwriter, musician, and children's author. She first rose to fame in the 1970s with a string of hit records; her 13 Top 40 U.S. hits include "Anticipation", "You Belong To Me", "Coming Around Again", and her four Gold certified singles "Jesse", "Mockingbird", "You're So Vain", and "Nobody Does It Better" from the 1977 James Bond film, The Spy Who Loved Me.

Let the River Run 1989 song performed by Carly Simon

"Let the River Run" is a song first featured in the 1988 film Working Girl, with music and lyrics by Carly Simon. The song won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1989. The song also won a Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song at the 46th Golden Globe Awards, tying with "Two Hearts" by Phil Collins and Lamont Dozier from Buster, in 1989, and a Grammy Award for Best Song Written Specifically for a Motion Picture or Television in 1990.

20th Century Fox American film studio

Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation is an American film studio that is a subsidiary of Walt Disney Studios, a division of The Walt Disney Company. The studio is located on its namesake studio lot in the Century City area of Los Angeles.

Results

A number of candidates withdrew from the race at the start of the convention as the rules stated that delegates won by withdrawn candidates could be replaced. The final contest for the nomination was between Michael Dukakis and Jesse Jackson.

Presidential nomination

Democratic National Convention presidential vote, 1988 [5]
CandidateVotesPercentage
Michael Dukakis 2,877(70.09%)
Jesse Jackson 1,219(29.70%)
Richard Stallings 3(0.07%)
Joe Biden 2(0.05%)
Dick Gephardt 2(0.05%)
Lloyd Bentsen 1(0.02%)
Gary Hart 1(0.02%)
Totals4,162100.00%

Vice-Presidential nomination

With Jackson's supporters demanding that he receive the vice presidential nomination as his reward for coming in second, the Dukakis campaign decided to nominate Senator Bentsen by voice vote, rather than a roll call. [6]

See also

1987 Libertarian National Convention

The 1987 Libertarian National Convention was held at the Sheraton Hotel in Seattle, Washington, from September 4 to September 6, 1987. Ron Paul of Texas was chosen as the Libertarian Party's nominee for President of the United States in the 1988 election.

1988 Republican National Convention

The 1988 Republican National Convention of the Republican Party of the United States was held in the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana from August 15 to August 18, 1988. It was the second time that a major party held its convention in one of the five states known as the Deep South, coming on the heels of the 1988 Democratic National Convention, which was held in Atlanta, Georgia. Much of the impetus for holding the convention in the Superdome came from the Louisiana Republican National Committeewoman Virginia Martinez of New Orleans, who lobbied on behalf of her adopted home city as the convention site as a member of the RNC Executive Committee.

History of the United States Democratic Party The oldest voter-based political party in the world

The Democratic Party is the oldest voter-based political party in the world and the oldest existing political party in the United States, tracing its heritage back to the anti-Federalists and the Jeffersonian Democratic-Republican Party of the 1790s. During the Second Party System under Presidents Andrew Jackson, Martin Van Buren and James K. Polk, the Democrats usually bested the opposition Whig Party by narrow margins. Both parties worked hard to build grassroots organizations and maximize the turnout of voters, which often reached 80 percent or 90 percent of eligible voters. Both parties used patronage extensively to finance their operations, which included emerging big city political machines as well as national networks of newspapers. The party was a proponent for slave-owners across the country, urban workers and caucasian immigrants.

Related Research Articles

1988 United States presidential election 51st quadrennial presidential election in the United States

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Lloyd Bentsen American politician

Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. was an American politician who was a four-term United States Senator (1971–1993) from Texas and the Democratic Party nominee for vice president in 1988 on the Michael Dukakis ticket. He also served as the 69th United States Secretary of the Treasury under President Bill Clinton.

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References

  1. Michael E. Eidenmuller (2009-02-13). "Top 100 Speeches of the 20th Century by Rank". American Rhetoric. Retrieved 2015-10-27.
  2. Kornacki, Steve (July 30, 2012). "When Bill Clinton died onstage". Salon. Retrieved March 19, 2017.
  3. 1 2 Apple, R. W. (1988-08-17). "The Republicans in New Orleans; Bush Chooses Senator Quayle of Indiana, A 41-Year-Old Conservative, For No. 2 Spot". The New York Times . Retrieved 2008-03-06.
  4. "Democrats sell themselves as party of strength at every opportunity". USA Today . 2004-07-27. Retrieved 2008-03-06.
  5. http://partners.nytimes.com/library/politics/camp/880621convention-dem-ra.html Accessed: April 4, 2013
  6. Riser, George C. (1 September 1992). "The Failure of Jesse Jackson's Vice-Presidential Quest: Sailing Against Political Tradition". Canadian Review of American Studies. 23 (1): 39–54. doi:10.3138/cras-023-01-03.
Preceded by
1984
San Francisco, California
Democratic National Conventions Succeeded by
1992
New York, New York