United States Senate Democratic Policy Committee

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The United States Senate Democratic Policy Committee is responsible for the creation of new United States Democratic Party policy proposals, supporting Democratic senators with legislative research, developing reports on legislation and policy, conducting oversight hearings, monitoring roll call votes, differentiating between Democratic and Republican positions, and building party unity.

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The committee was established in 1947, by an act signed by President Harry S. Truman, alongside its Republican counterpart. From 1947 to 2000, the Democratic leader was also the policy committee chairman. From 1989 to 1999, there was a co-chairman. Starting in 1999, the co-chairman was dropped and the position of policy committee chairman became a separate position elected by the Senate Democratic Caucus. The floor leader served as committee chair until 1989, when one of the co-chairs remained leader (Mitchell through 1995 and then Daschle until 1999). The committee chairman is a member of the Democratic party leadership of the United States Senate.

List of Chairs

TermChair(s)
1947–1949
1949–1951
1951–1953
1953–1961
1961–1977
1977–1989
1989–1995 Tom Daschle (SD) George J. Mitchell (ME)
1995–1999 Harry Reid (NV)
1999–2011
2011–2017
2017–present

113th Congress members

Members
SenatorState
Chuck Schumer, ChairmanNew York
Jack Reed, Regional ChairRhode Island
Mary Landrieu, Regional ChairLouisiana
Patty Murray, Regional ChairWashington
Harry Reid Nevada
Dianne Feinstein California
Ron Wyden Oregon
Tim Johnson South Dakota
Bill Nelson Florida
Tom Carper Delaware
Barbara Mikulski Maryland
Sherrod Brown Ohio
Ex officio
Dick Durbin, Democratic WhipIllinois
Patty Murray, Assistant Democratic LeaderWashington

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