United States Senate Reception Room

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Senate Reception Room
U.S. Senate Reception Room.jpg
Southwest corner of the Senate Reception Room in 2004
Building United States Capitol
Location Washington, DC
Country United States
Purpose Meetings

The United States Senate Reception Room is located in the United States Capitol and is one of the Capitol's most richly decorated public rooms that features the work of Italian artist Constantino Brumidi. [1] The room, numbered S-213, has historically been used for meetings and ceremonies. These decorations feature nine permanent portraits of the greatest Senators as determined by a Senate committee. These portraits are placed in massive and ornate golden frames. [2]

United States Capitol seat of the United States Congress

The United States Capitol, often called the Capitol Building, is the home of the United States Congress and the seat of the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. It is located on Capitol Hill at the eastern end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Though no longer at the geographic center of the Federal District, the Capitol forms the origin point for the District's street-numbering system and the District's four quadrants.

Constantino Brumidi Greek-Italian-American painter

Constantino Brumidi was a Greek-Italian-American historical painter, best known and honored for his fresco work in the Capitol Building in Washington, DC.

United States Senate Upper house of the United States Congress

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress which, along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislature of the United States. The Senate chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol Building, in Washington, D.C.

Contents

Senator portraits

In 1957, a Senate Committee headed by then Senator John F. Kennedy was tasked to decide on the five greatest U.S. Senators of all time so their portraits could decorate the Senate Reception Room. [3] John C. Calhoun (South Carolina) and the two others from the "Great Triumvirate" of Congressional leaders, Daniel Webster (Massachusetts) and Henry Clay (Kentucky), were included as well as Robert A. Taft (Ohio) and Robert M. La Follette Sr. (Wisconsin). In 2004, Arthur H. Vandenberg (Michigan) and Robert F. Wagner (New York) were added. In 2006, Roger Sherman and Oliver Ellsworth both from Connecticut were added, changing the group's informal name to become the "famous nine". [3]

John F. Kennedy 35th president of the United States

John Fitzgerald Kennedy, often referred to by initials JFK and Jack, was an American politician who served as the 35th president of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963. Kennedy served at the height of the Cold War, and the majority of his work as president dealt with managing relations with the Soviet Union and Cuba. A Democrat, Kennedy represented Massachusetts in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate prior to becoming president.

John C. Calhoun 7th Vice President of the United States

John Caldwell Calhoun was an American statesman from the Democratic party and political theorist from South Carolina who served as the seventh vice president of the United States from 1825 to 1832. He is remembered for strongly defending slavery and for advancing the concept of minority rights in politics, which he did in the context of protecting the interests of the white South when it was outnumbered by Northerners. He began his political career as a nationalist, modernizer, and proponent of a strong national government and protective tariffs. In the late 1820s, his views changed radically, and he became a leading proponent of states' rights, limited government, nullification, and opposition to high tariffs—he saw Northern acceptance of these policies as a condition of the South remaining in the Union. His beliefs and warnings heavily influenced the South's secession from the Union in 1860–1861.

South Carolina U.S. state in the United States

South Carolina is a state in the Southeastern United States and the easternmost of the Deep South. It is bordered to the north by North Carolina, to the southeast by the Atlantic Ocean, and to the southwest by Georgia across the Savannah River.

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References

  1. "Full House Passes Pascrell Legislation Authorizing Ceremony to Honor Constantino Brumidi" (Press release). US House of Representatives. July 29, 2015. Archived from the original on May 16, 2018. Retrieved May 15, 2018.
  2. Shaw, John T. (2013). JFK in the Senate: Pathway to the Presidency. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 15. ISBN   978-0-230-34183-8.
  3. 1 2 "The 'Famous Five'". United States Senate. March 12, 1959. Retrieved January 23, 2019.