Thurgood Marshall Federal Judiciary Building

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Front sign
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Front glass

The Thurgood Marshall Federal Judiciary Building (TMFJB) houses offices that support the work of the United States Courts, including the Administrative Office of the United States Courts, the Federal Judicial Center, the United States Sentencing Commission, and the Office of the Clerk of the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation.

It is located at One Columbus Circle NE in Washington D.C. adjacent to Union Station, a few blocks from the United States Capitol. It was completed in 1992 and was designed by architect Edward Larrabee Barnes and main partner John Ming Yee Lee. It features a dramatic five-story tall glass atrium at its main entrance.

The building was named after Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American justice of the Supreme Court.

It is under the jurisdiction of the Architect of the Capitol as part of the United States Capitol Complex.

Coordinates: 38°53′48″N77°00′15″W / 38.8966°N 77.0043°W / 38.8966; -77.0043


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