Longworth House Office Building

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Longworth House Office Building
LongworthHouseOfficeBuilding.jpg
The Longworth House Office Building
Location map Washington, D.C. central.png
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Location within Washington, D.C.
General information
StatusComplete
Architectural style Neoclassical
Location United States Capitol Complex
Town or city Washington, D.C.
CountryUnited States
Coordinates 38°53′12.48″N77°0′30.6″W / 38.8868000°N 77.008500°W / 38.8868000; -77.008500 Coordinates: 38°53′12.48″N77°0′30.6″W / 38.8868000°N 77.008500°W / 38.8868000; -77.008500
OpenedApril 1933
Technical details
MaterialMarble
Grounds702,608 square feet (65,274.4 m2)
Design and construction
ArchitectFrank Upman, Gilbert LaCoste Rodier, Nathan C. Wyeth and Louis Justemente
Architecture firmAllied Architects of Washington

The Longworth House Office Building (LHOB) is one of three office buildings used by the United States House of Representatives. The building is located south of the Capitol, bounded by Independence Avenue, New Jersey Avenue, C Street S.E., and South Capitol Street, in southeast Washington. It covers an area of 599,675 square feet (55,711.6 m2) and has a total of 251 congressional offices and suites, five large committee rooms, seven small committee rooms, and a large assembly room now used by the Ways and Means Committee.

Contents

The building was named in 1962 in honor of the former Speaker of the House, Nicholas Longworth of Ohio. He served as Speaker from 1925 until Republicans lost their majority in 1931, the same year he died, and the same year the building was authorized.

Description

It is the smallest House office building, with a floor area of just under 600,000 square feet (56,000 m2). [1]

"Because of its position on a sloping site, the rusticated base of the Longworth Building varies in height from two to four stories. Above this granite base stand the three principal floors, which are faced with white marble. Ionic columns supporting a well-proportioned entablature are used for the building's five porticoes, the principal one of which is topped by a pediment. Two additional stories are partially hidden by a marble balustrade. It presents a somewhat more restrained appearance than the neighboring Cannon Building, which was designed in the more theatrical Beaux Arts style. The Longworth Building takes its place along with the National Gallery of Art (1941) and the Jefferson Memorial (1943) as one of Washington's best examples of the Neo-classical Revival style". [1]

History

Construction

The Longworth Building (center) is located between the Rayburn Building (left, partial view) and Cannon Building (Right) Aerial View of the House Office Buildings and U.S. Capitol - November 6, 2015.jpg
The Longworth Building (center) is located between the Rayburn Building (left, partial view) and Cannon Building (Right)

Plans to provide the House of Representatives with a second office building were begun in 1925. Severe overcrowding in the Cannon House Office Building (completed in 1908) led to the renovation of the Cannon Building and the construction of the Longworth Building". [1]

Under the direction of Architect of the Capitol David Lynn, preliminary designs for the building were prepared by a local firm known as The Allied Architects of Washington Inc. The principal architects were Frank Upman, Gilbert LaCoste Rodier, Nathan C. Wyeth, and Louis Justemente. They produced "two schemes for a simple, dignified building in harmony with the rest of the Capitol Complex. In January 1929 Congress authorized $8.4 million for acquiring and clearing the site and for constructing the new building. The foundations were completed in December 1930, and the building was accepted for occupancy in April 1933". [1]

The site of the building had previously been occupied by the Butler Building, which was the headquarters of the Public Health Service Commissioned Corps; and the Richards Building, the headquarters of the Coast and Geodetic Survey, which were both demolished. [2] [3]

Later history

The large assembly room of the Longworth Building, which seats 450 people, was used by the House of Representatives as their primary meeting room in 1949 and 1950 while its chamber in the United States Capitol was being remodeled. It is currently the meeting room for the House Ways and Means Committee. In the 1960s, the House Beauty Shop, a salon which catered to Congresspersons, their spouses, and employees, was relocated to the Cannon House Office Building from the smaller Longworth House Office Building under the auspices of the Beauty Shop Committee. [4]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Architect of the Capitol: Longworth House Office Building" . Retrieved 2012-05-29.
  2. Furman, Bess (1973). A Profile of the United States Public Health Service, 1798–1948. National Institutes of Health. pp. 198, 201–202, 367.
  3. "United States Coast Survey". Adolf Cluss Virtual Exhibition. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  4. "Wash, Rinse, and Equal Treatment". United States House of Representatives Archives. 2016-10-24. Retrieved 2020-01-10.