United States House of Representatives Office of Interparliamentary Affairs

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The Office of Interparliamentary Affairs is an office of the United States House of Representatives that is responsible for working with "parliamentarians, officers, or employees of foreign legislative bodies" to organize official visits to the House of Representatives.

United States House of Representatives lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper chamber. Together they comprise the legislature of the United States.

Created in 2003 by the Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 2004, the Office is headed by a Director, appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives. They serve for as long as they are sanctioned by the Speaker and, with the approval of the Speaker, they may appoint other employees necessary to carry out the functions of the Office.

Speaker of the United States House of Representatives position

The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the United States House of Representatives. The office was established in 1789 by Article I, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution. The Speaker is the political and parliamentary leader of the House of Representatives, and is simultaneously the House's presiding officer, de facto leader of the body's majority party, and the institution's administrative head. Speakers also perform various other administrative and procedural functions. Given these several roles and responsibilities, the Speaker usually does not personally preside over debates. That duty is instead delegated to members of the House from the majority party. Neither does the Speaker regularly participate in floor debates.

Directors of Interparliamentary Affairs:

Specific duties of the Office include:

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References

  1. https://www.congress.gov/congressional-record/2003/10/24/house-section/article/h9815-9?q=%7B%22search%22%3A%5B%22%5C%22Office+of+Interparliamentary+Affairs%5C%22%22%5D%7D&r=44
  2. https://www.congress.gov/congressional-record/2011/9/22/house-section/article/h6355-3?q=%7B%22search%22%3A%5B%22%5C%22Office+of+Interparliamentary+Affairs%5C%22%22%5D%7D&r=19

Title 2 of the United States Code outlines the role of Congress in the United States Code.