List of Buddhist members of the United States Congress

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This is a list of Buddhist members of the United States Congress .

Contents

As of 2020, only three Buddhists have ever been elected to Congress, the first being Mazie Hirono and Hank Johnson in 2007. One Buddhist currently serves in the House of Representatives and one Buddhist serves in the Senate.

Senate

Buddhist members of the Senate
SenatorPartyStateTerm startTerm endNotes
Mazie Hirono, official portrait, 113th Congress.jpg Mazie Hirono
(born 1947) [1] [2]
Democratic Hawaii January 3, 2013IncumbentFirst Buddhist in the Senate

House of Representatives

Buddhist members of the House of Representatives
RepresentativePartyStateTerm startTerm endNotes
Mazie Hirono, official portrait, 113th Congress.jpg Mazie Hirono
(born 1947) [1] [2]
Democratic Hawaii January 3, 2007January 3, 2013First of two Buddhists in Congress
Hank Johnson official photo.jpg Hank Johnson
(born 1954) [3]
Democratic Georgia January 3, 2007IncumbentFirst of two Buddhists in Congress
Colleen Hanabusa Official Photo.jpg Colleen Hanabusa
(born 1951) [4]
Democratic Hawaii January 3, 2011January 3, 2015Her election made Hawaii the only state with a majority non-Christian House delegation.
November 14, 2016January 3, 2019

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "Buddhists Get the Vote". Manitoba Buddhist Temple. November 5, 2010. Archived from the original on July 12, 2013. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  2. 1 2 Camire, Dennis (January 5, 2007). "What happened to ... religious tolerance". Honolulu Advertiser. Gannett Company. Retrieved August 9, 2011.
  3. Jonathan Tilove. "New Congress brings with it religious firsts". Newhouse News Service. Archived from the original on 19 December 2006.
  4. "Faith on the Hill: The Religious Composition of the 114th Congress". Pew Research Center. January 5, 2015. Retrieved September 13, 2016. The number of Buddhists in Congress fell from three to two, as Rep. Colleen Hanabusa, D-Hawaii, lost her bid for a Senate seat.