Enrolled bill

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In the United States Congress, an enrolled bill is the final copy of a bill or joint resolution which has passed both houses of Congress in identical form. [1]

In the United States, enrolled bills are engrossed—prepared in a formally printed copy—and must be signed by the presiding officers of both houses and sent to the president of the United States for approval. [2]

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References

  1. Enrolled bill defined on the U.S. Senate website
  2. 1 U.S.C.   § 106