Caucuses of the United States Congress

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A congressional caucus is a group of members of the United States Congress that meets to pursue common legislative objectives. Formally, caucuses are formed as Congressional Member Organizations (CMOs) through the United States House of Representatives and governed under the rules of that chamber. Caucuses are informal in the Senate, and unlike their House counterparts, Senate groups receive neither official recognition nor funding from the chamber. In addition to the term caucus, they are sometimes called coalitions, study groups, task forces, or working groups. [1] Caucuses typically have bipartisan membership and have co-chairs from each party. Chairs are listed below the name of each caucus (for the most part as of the 115th United States Congress).

Contents

This is a list of congressional CMOs of the United States Congress, as listed by the House Administration Committee as of June 3, 2019. [2] This article also contains a list of sponsoring Members for Congressional Staff Organizations (CSOs) as of June 11, 2019. [3]

Congressional Member Organizations (CMOs)

0–9

A

B

Border Security Caucus meeting in 2020. Border Security Caucus - 2.13.20.jpg
Border Security Caucus meeting in 2020.

C


D

E

F

G

H

I

K

L

M

N

O

P

R

S

T

U

V

W

Congressional Staff Organizations (CSOs)

See also

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References

  1. Glassman, Matthew E. (January 26, 2017), "Congressional Member Organizations: Their Purpose and Activities, History, and Formation" (PDF), CRS Report, Congressional Research Service, (#7-5700, R40683), retrieved March 28, 2017
  2. "116th Congress Congressional Member Organizations (CMOs)" (PDF). United States House of Representatives. June 3, 2019. Retrieved June 15, 2019.
  3. "116th Congress Congressional Staff Organizations (CSOs)" (PDF). United States House of Representatives. June 11, 2019. Retrieved June 15, 2019.
  4. "Congressional Law Enforcement Caucus | U.S. Representative Bill Pascrell". pascrell.house.gov. Retrieved 2020-05-12.