U.S. senator bibliography (congressional memoirs)

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Seal of the U.S. Senate

This is a bibliography of U.S. congressional memoirs by former and current U.S. senators. [1] [2]

Contents

The United States Senate is the upper house of the bicameral legislature of the United States, and together with the United States House of Representatives comprises the United States Congress. The composition and powers of the Senate are established in Article One of the U.S. Constitution. [3] Each U.S. state is represented by two senators, regardless of population. Senators serve staggered six-year terms. The chamber of the United States Senate is located in the north wing of the Capitol, in Washington, D.C., the national capital. The House of Representatives convenes in the south wing of the same building.

Congressional memoirs

External video
Nuvola apps kaboodle.svg Booknotes interview with James Abourezk on Advise & Dissent, March 25, 1990, C-SPAN
External video
Nuvola apps kaboodle.svg Booknotes interview with Tom Daschle on Like No Other Time: The 107th Congress and the Two Years That Changed America, November 30, 2003, C-SPAN
External video
Nuvola apps kaboodle.svg Booknotes interview with Paul Simon on Advice and Consent: Clarence Thomas, Robert Bork and the Intriguing History of the Supreme Court's Nomination Battles, September 20, 1992, C-SPAN
External video
Nuvola apps kaboodle.svg Booknotes interview with Arlen Specter on Passion for Truth, January 28, 2001, C-SPAN

Notes

  1. Egerton, Charles W. (1994). Political Memoir-essays on the politics of memory. Psychology Press.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 Dorothy Hazelrigg (ed.). "Bibliography of Congressional Memoirs-U.S. Senators" (PDF). University of South Carolina. Retrieved 2011-11-28.
  3. "Constitution of the United States". Senate.gov. 2009-03-26. Retrieved 2010-10-04.
  4. United States Congress. "KENNEDY, Edward Moore (Ted), (1932 - 2009) (id: K000105)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress . Retrieved November 26, 2012.
  5. "LODGE, Henry Cabot, (1850 - 1924)". Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress. Retrieved 2011-12-03.
  6. "McKELLAR, Kenneth Douglas, (1869 - 1957)". Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress. Retrieved 2011-12-03.
  7. "MACLAY, William, (1737 - 1804)". Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress. Retrieved 2011-12-03.
  8. "MANGUM, Willie Person, (1792 - 1861)". Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress. Retrieved 2012-12-03.
  9. "MITCHELL, George John, (1933 - )". Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress. Retrieved 2011-12-01.
  10. "SCOTT, Hugh Doggett, Jr., (1900 - 1994)". Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress. Retrieved 2011-12-01.
  11. "SHERMAN, John, (1823 - 1900)". Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress. Retrieved 2011-12-01.
  12. "SMITH, Margaret Chase, (1897 - 1995)". Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress. Retrieved 2011-12-01.
  13. "STEWART, William Morris, (1827 - 1909)". Biographical Directory of the U.S Congress. Retrieved 2011-12-01.
  14. "TRACY, Uriah, (1755 - 1807)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 2011-11-30.
  15. "UNDERWOOD, Oscar Wilder, (1862 - 1929)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 2011-11-30.
  16. "VANDENBERG, Arthur Hendrick, (1884 - 1951)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 2011-11-30.

See also

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