Sam Rayburn

Last updated

  1. Brown, Fred (2005). Marking Time: East Tennessee Historical Markers and the Stories Behind Them. Univ. of Tennessee Press. p. 270. ISBN   978-1-57233-330-7.
  2. Hardeman, D. B.; Brown, Donald C. (1987). Rayburn: A Biography. Austin, TX: Texas Monthly Press. p. 12. ISBN   978-0932012036.
  3. "Biography - Sam Rayburn Museum". Dolph Briscoe Center for American History. December 19, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  4. "Sam Rayburn's feat of graduation". North Texas e-News. August 16, 2003. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  5. Library, Texas Legislative Reference (November 16, 1961). "Legislators and Leaders - Member profile". Legislative Reference Library. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  6. Cox, Patrick L.; Phillips, Michael (March 1, 2010). The House Will Come To Order: How the Texas Speaker Became a Power in State and National Politics. University of Texas Press. p. 27. ISBN   978-0-292-72205-7.
  7. 1 2 Shanks, Alexander G (1968). "Sam Rayburn in the Wilson Administrations, 1913-1921". East Texas Historical Journal. 6: 9.
  8. "Congressman Rayburn". Fannin County Historical Commission. November 16, 1961. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  9. "Sam Rayburn". Famous Texans. April 7, 1913. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  10. Brown, D. Clayton (1974). "Sam Rayburn and the Development of Public Power in the Southwest". The Southwestern Historical Quarterly. 78 (2): 140–154. JSTOR   30240993.
  11. Anderson, Paul E. (May 11, 1935). "Sam Rayburn and Rural Electrification". East Texas History. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  12. Turner, David P (1965). Sam Rayburn and New Deal Legislation 1933–1936 (MA). North Texas State University. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  13. Timmons, Bascom N. (October 24, 1961). "Rayburn Maneuvers Kept U.S. Moving in 1941" . Lawton Constitution. Lawton, OK. p. 14 via Newspapers.com.
  14. "How Mr. Sam Saved the Draft". Washington Post. August 18, 1991. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  15. "Sam Rayburn and World War II". North Texas e-News. Retrieved January 6, 2019.
  16. "Retrieved 26 December 2018" . Retrieved January 6, 2019.
  17. Champagne, Anthony (2009). The Austin-Boston Connection: Five Decades of House Democratic Leadership, 1937-1989. Texas A&M University Press. p. 124. ISBN   978-1-60344-326-5.
  18. "Rayburn's 1947 Cadillac - THC.Texas.gov - Texas Historical Commission". www.thc.texas.gov. Retrieved January 6, 2019.
  19. Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, UT Austin (November 11, 2008). "41st through 50th - Guide to Speakers of the Texas House - Texas House Speakers Oral History - Projects". www.cah.utexas.edu. Retrieved January 6, 2019.
  20. "On This Day: August 21". archive.nytimes.com. Retrieved January 6, 2019.
  21. "Texas Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn's Bold Move to Increase the Size of the Committee on Rules - US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives". history.house.gov. Retrieved January 6, 2019.
  22. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Anthony Champagne, University of Texas at Dallas, "Sam Rayburn", West Texas Historical Association joint meeting with the East Texas Historical Association in Fort Worth, February 26, 2010.
  23. Badger, Tony (1999). "Southerners Who Refused to Sign the Southern Manifesto". The Historical Journal . 42 (2): 517–534. doi:10.1017/s0018246x98008346. JSTOR   3020998.
  24. H. G. Dulaney & Edward Hake Phillips, Speak, Mr. Speaker 20 (1978).
  25. Anthony Champagne, Congressman Sam Rayburn 32 (1984)
  26. Anthony Champagne, Congressman Sam Rayburn 31 (1984)
  27. Eddington, Mark (February 25, 2006). "Bennett backs off on ethics remarks". The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  28. "Inventory & Appraisement of the Estate of Sam Rayburn, Fannin County Clerk's Office" (PDF).
  29. "THE CONGRESS: The Prelude of the 83rd". TIME.com. January 12, 1953. Archived from the original on September 30, 2007. Retrieved May 6, 2015.
  30. "Rayburn:Dv 00147 - GLIFOS". av.cah.utexas.edu. Retrieved January 6, 2019.
  31. "Person Details for Metze Neely, "United States Social Security Death Index" — FamilySearch.org". familysearch.org. Retrieved May 6, 2015.
  32. "'Mr. Speaker:' Sam Rayburn of Texas - The Knoxville Focus". knoxfocus.com. Retrieved August 19, 2018.
  33. "Letter Provides Peek At Personal Sam Rayburn". CBS-DFW. Associated Press. August 16, 2014.
  34. "Rayburn's "lady-friend": Local historians to publish former Speaker's personal life". Plano Star Courier. September 29, 2016.
  35. The Path to Power, p. 333.
  36. UPI (October 6, 1961). "Sam Rayburn is Dying of Cancer". Desert Sun.
  37. "Who's Who within the Waller Family". Alleylaw. September 16, 1940. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  38. "Sam Rayburn Tollway (SRT)". North Texas Tollway Authority.
  39. [ dead link ]
  40. "Rayburn Reception Room". US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives. September 11, 2001. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  41. "The Rayburn Room". The New York Times. November 21, 1985. Retrieved August 9, 2019.

Further reading

Sam Rayburn
Sam Rayburn.jpg
43rd Speaker of the United States House of Representatives
In office
January 3, 1955 November 16, 1961
Texas House of Representatives
Preceded by
Member of the Texas House of Representatives
from District 34  (Bonham)

1907–1913
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives
1911–1913
Succeeded by
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Texas's 4th congressional district

March 4, 1913 – November 16, 1961
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Majority Leader of the U.S. House of Representatives
1937–1940
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
September 16, 1940 – January 3, 1947
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
January 3, 1949 – January 3, 1953
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
January 5, 1955 – November 16, 1961
Succeeded by
Party political offices
Preceded by
Democratic Caucus Chairman of the U.S. House of Representatives
1923–1925
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Permanent Chairman of the Democratic National Convention
1948, 1952, 1956
Succeeded by
Honorary titles
Preceded by
Dean of the U.S. House of Representatives
January 5, 1953 – November 16, 1961
Succeeded by