Governor of Rhode Island

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Governor of Rhode Island
Seal of the Governor of Rhode Island.svg
Seal of the Governor
Flag of the Governor of Rhode Island.svg
Flag of the Governor
Governor Gina Raimondo of Rhode Island.jpg
Incumbent
Gina Raimondo

since January 6, 2015
Style
Status
Term length Four years; limited to two consecutive terms.
Inaugural holder Nicholas Cooke
FormationNovember 7, 1775
(244 years ago)
 (1775-11-07)
Deputy Lieutenant Governor of Rhode Island
Salary$139,694.88 (2018) [1]
Website Official website OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg

The Governor of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations is the head of the executive branch of the Government of Rhode Island and serves as commander-in-chief of the State's Army National Guard and Air National Guard. The current governor is Democrat Gina Raimondo.

Contents

Constitutional authority and responsibilities

Section I, Article IX [2] , of the Rhode Island Constitution reads,

Power vested in governor. -- The chief executive power of this state shall be vested in a governor, who, together with a lieutenant governor, shall be elected by the people.

The Governor of Rhode Island is elected every four years and is limited to two consecutive terms. As the Chief executive of the Government of Rhode Island, the Governor is supported by a number of elected general officers and appointed directors of state agencies.

Responsibilities granted to the Governor by the Rhode Island Constitution include the position of Commander-in-chief of all components of the Rhode Island National Guard, so long as they remain un-federalized by the President of the United States, and the responsibility to submit the annual state budget to the Rhode Island General Assembly.

The Governor also has the power to grant pardons and veto bills, resolutions and votes subject to a two-thirds override.

Party affiliation

Number of Governors of Rhode Island by party affiliation [3]
PartyGovernors
Republican 32
Democratic 21
Democratic-Republican 4
Independent 4
Whig 4
Country 3
Law and Order 2
Dorr Rebellion 1
Federalist 1
Know Nothing 1
Rhode Island Party1

Colonial Rhode Island, 1640–1775

See also

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References

  1. "State of RI Payroll Tranparency Portal". State of Rhode Island. Retrieved November 12, 2018.
  2. http://www.rilin.state.ri.us/riconstitution/Pages/C09.aspx
  3. Table does not include governors from the colonial period, when there were no organized parties in Rhode Island, and governors were generally appointed rather than elected. It also does not include acting governors.