Washington County, Rhode Island

Last updated
Washington County
Washington County Courthouse (Rhode Island).jpg
Map of Rhode Island highlighting Washington County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Rhode Island
Rhode Island in United States.svg
Rhode Island's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 41°27′16″N71°34′52″W / 41.454544°N 71.581154°W / 41.454544; -71.581154
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Rhode Island.svg  Rhode Island
FoundedJune 3, 1729
Seat West Kingston
Largest town South Kingstown
Area
  Total563 sq mi (1,460 km2)
  Land329 sq mi (850 km2)
  Water234 sq mi (610 km2)  41%%
Population
 (2010)
  Total126,979
  Estimate 
(2019)
125,577
  Density230/sq mi (87/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district 2nd

Washington County, known locally as South County, is a county located in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. As of the 2010 census, the population was 126,979. [1] Rhode Island counties have no governmental functions other than as court administrative and sheriff corrections boundaries, which are part of the state government. [2]

Contents

History

Washington County was created as Kings County in 1729 within the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. It was renamed Washington County on October 29, 1781 in honor of George Washington. At the earliest stage of colonial settlement, the area was called "The Narragansett Country", named after the Naragansett tribe and its tributary tribe the Niantics, both of whom lived in the area.

Early land purchases in the Narragansett Country were effected by settlers after the establishment of Indian trading posts at Fort Neck in Charlestown, and at "Smith's Castle" in Wickford. A series of conflicts involving the Manisseans on Block Island gave that island to the Massachusetts Bay Colony for a number of years, before being transferred to the Rhode Island Colony under Newport County, and then finally to Washington County in 1959.

The borders of the Narragansett country were disputed for nearly 100 years among the colonies of Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Massachusetts. The Narragansetts had pledged their fealty to King Charles, and the area was known as "The King's Province" and was placed under the authority of Rhode Island "until the King's pleasure was further known". In 1664, a royal commission under Charles II stepped in to adjudicate these conflicting claims. The commission extinguished the claims of Massachusetts, and Rhode Island was granted jurisdiction until the commission finished processing Connecticut's appeals, which were not ended until 1726. Settlements of King's Province were named to reflect the English Restoration, in honor of King Charles II. Towns reflecting this history include the two Kingstowns and Charlestown, as well as the villages of Kingston and West Kingston.

Washington County is also known in Rhode Island as "South County". [3]

Geography

Historic Downtown Westerly, Rhode Island Downtown Westerly, RI.jpg
Historic Downtown Westerly, Rhode Island

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 563 square miles (1,460 km2), of which 329 square miles (850 km2) is land and 234 square miles (610 km2) (41%) is water. [4] It is the largest county in Rhode Island by total area. The county's topography ranges from flat along the shoreline to gently rolling hills farther inland. The highest point is a large area approximately 560 feet (171 m) above sea level in the Exeter neighborhood of Black Plain; [5] the lowest point is sea level along the coast. The northern boundary west of Davisville is approximately 41.60°N. The western boundary north of Westerly is approximately 71.79°W.

National protected areas

Major Highways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1790 18,323
1800 16,135−11.9%
1810 14,962−7.3%
1820 15,6874.8%
1830 15,411−1.8%
1840 14,324−7.1%
1850 16,43014.7%
1860 18,71513.9%
1870 20,0977.4%
1880 22,49511.9%
1890 23,6495.1%
1900 24,1542.1%
1910 24,9423.3%
1920 24,9320.0%
1930 29,33417.7%
1940 32,49310.8%
1950 48,54249.4%
1960 59,05421.7%
1970 83,58641.5%
1980 93,31711.6%
1990 110,00617.9%
2000 123,54612.3%
2010 126,9792.8%
2019 (est.)125,577 [6] −1.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]
1790-1960 [8] 1900-1990 [9]
1990-2000 [10] 2010-2019 [1]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 126,979 people, 49,177 households, and 32,297 families residing in the county. [11] The population density was 385.7 inhabitants per square mile (148.9/km2). There were 62,206 housing units at an average density of 188.9 per square mile (72.9/km2). [12] The racial makeup of the county was 93.8% white, 1.6% Asian, 1.2% black or African American, 0.9% American Indian, 0.7% from other races, and 1.8% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 2.4% of the population. [11]

The largest ancestry groups were: [13]

Of the 49,177 households, 28.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.2% were married couples living together, 9.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 34.3% were non-families, and 26.1% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.95. The median age was 42.3 years. [11]

The median income for a household in the county was $70,285 and the median income for a family was $87,999. Males had a median income of $59,598 versus $44,851 for females. The per capita income for the county was $34,737. About 3.4% of families and 7.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.3% of those under age 18 and 5.0% of those age 65 or over. [14]

Communities

Map of Washington County, Rhode Island showing towns, census-designated places, and Narragansett tribal lands Map of Washington County Rhode Island With Municipal Labels.PNG
Map of Washington County, Rhode Island showing towns, census-designated places, and Narragansett tribal lands

Towns

Census-designated places

Other villages

Politics

Similar to other counties in Rhode Island, Washington County votes Democratic in presidential elections, having last voted Republican in 1984.

United States presidential election results for Washington County, Rhode Island [15] [16]
Year Republican  /  Whig Democratic Third party
No.%No.%No.%
2020 29,81839.20%44,54958.57%1,6932.23%
2016 27,23041.03%33,74150.84%5,3988.13%
2012 25,36640.34%35,88857.07%1,6252.58%
2008 25,62438.73%39,08259.07%1,4542.20%
2004 26,53342.36%34,67955.37%1,4222.27%
2000 21,25337.80%29,56052.58%5,4119.62%
1996 16,30232.71%25,95852.09%7,57215.20%
1992 16,21130.62%23,00943.46%13,72425.92%
1988 21,65048.04%23,21051.51%2020.45%
1984 24,36557.59%17,79342.06%1470.35%
1980 16,93241.47%16,42940.24%7,46618.29%
1976 17,85649.57%17,98049.91%1860.52%
1972 19,28058.46%13,63741.35%620.19%
1968 11,63943.40%13,85151.65%1,3284.95%
1964 7,34229.63%17,43470.37%00.00%
1960 12,65152.21%11,58047.79%00.00%
1956 14,27865.71%7,45034.29%00.00%
1952 13,38961.29%8,44838.67%90.04%
1948 9,52255.88%7,37943.30%1400.82%
1944 8,23356.12%6,41943.76%180.12%
1940 9,23360.54%6,00139.35%170.11%
1936 8,76458.21%5,95639.56%3362.23%
1932 7,30758.42%5,04740.35%1531.22%
1928 7,79368.84%3,50030.92%270.24%
1924 8,03875.21%2,36622.14%2832.65%
1920 6,42074.93%2,01223.48%1361.59%
1916 2,83755.17%2,22443.25%811.58%
1912 2,12944.91%1,69135.67%92119.43%
1908 3,04366.46%1,27827.91%2585.63%
1904 3,18970.63%1,19726.51%1292.86%
1900 2,42166.35%96026.31%2687.34%
1896 3,04072.05%65415.50%52512.44%
1892 2,18352.83%1,50136.33%44810.84%
1888 2,34657.54%1,49236.60%2395.86%
1884 2,01460.08%1,15534.46%1835.46%
1880 2,01762.02%1,22937.79%60.18%
1844 96757.59%71242.41%00.00%


See also

Related Research Articles

Rhode Island State of the United States

Rhode Island, officially the State of Rhode Island, is a state in the New England region of the United States. It is the smallest U.S. state by area and the seventh-least populous, but it is also the second-most densely populated behind New Jersey. The state takes its name from the island of the same name; however, most of the state is on the mainland. The state has land borders with Connecticut to the west, Massachusetts to the north and east, and the Atlantic Ocean to the south via Rhode Island Sound and Block Island Sound. It also shares a small maritime border with New York. Providence is the state capital and most populous city in Rhode Island.

Providence County, Rhode Island County in Rhode Island, US

Providence County is the most populous county in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. As of the 2010 census, the county's population was 626,667, or 59.5% of the state's population. Providence County contains the city of Providence, the state capital of Rhode Island and the county's most populous city, with an estimated 179,335 residents in 2018. Providence County is included in the Providence-Warwick, RI-MA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which in turn constitutes a portion of the greater Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area. In 2010, the center of population of Rhode Island was located in Providence County, in the city of Cranston.

Newport County, Rhode Island County in Rhode Island, US

Newport County is one of five counties located in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. As of the 2010 census, the population was 82,888. It is also one of the seven regions of Rhode Island. The county was created in 1703. Like all of the counties in Rhode Island, Newport County no longer has any governmental functions. All of those functions in Rhode Island are now carried out either by the state government, or by the cities and towns of Rhode Island. Newport County is included in the Providence-Warwick, RI-MA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is in turn constitutes a portion of the greater Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area.

Jamestown, Rhode Island Town in Rhode Island, United States

Jamestown is a town in Newport County, Rhode Island in the United States. The population was 5,559 at the 2020 census. Jamestown is situated almost entirely on Conanicut Island, the second largest island in Narragansett Bay. It also includes the uninhabited Dutch Island and Gould Island.

Ashaway, Rhode Island Village and CDP in Hopkinton, Rhode Island, US

Ashaway is an unincorporated village and census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Hopkinton, Rhode Island. It is a principal village of Hopkinton, along with Hope Valley, although it is the smaller of the two. The population was 1,485 at the 2010 census. The name Ashaway is derived from the American Indian name for the river that runs through the village, the Ashawague or Ashawaug, which means "land in the middle" or "land between" in the Niantic and Mohegan languages. The name "Ashawague River" appears as late as 1832 on the Findley map of Rhode Island published in Philadelphia.

Charlestown, Rhode Island Town in Rhode Island, United States

Charlestown is a town in Washington County, Rhode Island, United States. The population was 7,997 at the 2020 census.

Exeter, Rhode Island Town in Rhode Island, United States

Exeter is a town in Washington County, Rhode Island, United States. Exeter extends east from the Connecticut border to the town of North Kingstown. It is bordered to the north by West Greenwich and East Greenwich, and to the south by Hopkinton, Richmond, and South Kingstown. Exeter's postal code is 02822, although small parts of the town have the mailing address West Kingston (02892) or Saunderstown (02874). The population was 6,460 at the 2020 census.

Hope Valley, Rhode Island CDP in Rhode Island, United States

Hope Valley is a village and census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Hopkinton in Washington County, Rhode Island, United States. The population of the CDP was 1,612 at the 2010 census. Hope Valley is the largest village in Hopkinton and the town's principal commercial center. While the village of Hope Valley is located in Hopkinton, its zip code, 02832, extends into the neighboring town of Richmond.

Hopkinton, Rhode Island Place

Hopkinton is a town in Washington County, Rhode Island. The population was 8,398 at the 2020 census.

Narragansett, Rhode Island Town in Rhode Island, United States

Narragansett is a town in Washington County, Rhode Island, United States. The population was 14,532 at the 2020 census. However, during the summer months the town's population more than doubles to near 34,000. The town is colloquially known as "Gansett". The town of Narragansett occupies a narrow strip of land running along the eastern bank of the Pettaquamscutt River to the shore of Narragansett Bay. It was separated from South Kingstown in 1888 and incorporated as a town in 1901.

North Kingstown, Rhode Island Town in Rhode Island, United States

North Kingstown is a town in Washington County, Rhode Island, United States, and is part of the Providence metropolitan area. The population was 27,732 in the 2020 census. North Kingstown is home to the birthplace of American portraitist Gilbert Stuart, who was born in the village of Saunderstown. Within the town is Quonset Point, location of the former Naval Air Station Quonset Point, known for the invention of the Quonset hut, as well as the historic village of Wickford.

Richmond, Rhode Island Town in Rhode Island, United States

Richmond is a town in Washington County, Rhode Island. The population was 8,020 at the 2020 census. It contains the villages of Alton, Arcadia, Barberville, Carolina, Hillsdale, Kenyon, Shannock, Tug Hollow, Usquepaug, Wood River Junction, Woodville, and Wyoming. Students in Richmond are part of the Chariho Regional School District.

South Kingstown, Rhode Island Town in Rhode Island, United States

South Kingstown is a town in, and the county seat of, Washington County, Rhode Island, United States. The population was 31,931 at the 2020 census.

Wakefield-Peacedale, Rhode Island CDP in Rhode Island, United States

Wakefield-Peacedale is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of South Kingstown in Washington County, Rhode Island, United States that includes the villages of Peace Dale and Wakefield. The population was 8,487 at the 2010 census.

Westerly, Rhode Island Town in Rhode Island, United States

Westerly is a town on the southwestern shoreline of Washington County, Rhode Island, first settled by English colonists in 1661 and incorporated as a municipality in 1669. It is a beachfront community on the south shore of the state with a population of 23,359 as of the 2020 census.

Pawcatuck River River in the U.S. states of Rhode Island and Connecticut

The Pawcatuck River is a river in the US states of Rhode Island and Connecticut flowing approximately 34 miles (55 km). There are eight dams along the river's length. USS Pawcatuck was named after the river.

Kingston, Rhode Island Census-designated place in Rhode Island, United States

Kingston is a village and a census-designated place within the town of South Kingstown in Washington County, Rhode Island, United States, and the site of the main campus of the University of Rhode Island. The population was 6,974 at the 2010 census. Much of the village center is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as Kingston Village Historic District. It was originally known as Little Rest.

Route 1A, largely signed as Scenic 1A, is a 33.3-mile (53.6 km) long numbered state highway located in Washington County, Rhode Island, United States. The route, which parallels U.S. Route 1 for its entire length, has four distinct sections connected by US 1, two of which require median u-turn ramps to cross US 1. It travels through five towns in Washington County: Westerly, Charlestown, South Kingstown, Narragansett, and North Kingstown.

Chariho is a regional school district located in southern Rhode Island shared by three adjacent towns; Charlestown, Richmond, and Hopkinton. The name Chariho is a portmanteau derived by taking the first two letters from each town name and combining them together. The district operates four elementary schools, two of which are located in Hopkinton, in the villages of Ashaway and Hope Valley, one in Charlestown, and one in Richmond. The Chariho campus located in the Richmond village of Wood River Junction houses the Middle and High Schools, as well as the Chariho Career And Technical Center.

South County History Center

The South County History Center, which formerly operated as the Pettaquamscutt Historical Society, is a nonprofit organization in Kingston, Rhode Island, United States, that preserves and interprets the material culture of South County through exhibits and study of archival, library and artifact collections.

References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 22, 2011. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  2. "National Associations of Counties listing for Washington County, Rhode Island". naco.org. Archived from the original on 7 May 2003. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  3. http://southcountyhistorycenter.org/about-south-county
  4. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  5. 41°35′09″N71°39′16″W / 41.58583°N 71.65444°W
  6. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved May 21, 2020.
  7. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  8. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Archived from the original on August 16, 2012. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  9. Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on November 9, 2014. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  10. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 18, 2014. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  11. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  12. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  13. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  14. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  15. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Archived from the original on 23 March 2018. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  16. "The Popular Vote of the United States, in the Presidential Election of 1844" . New York Daily Herald (5270). November 7, 1848. p. 1. Retrieved 2 August 2020 via Newspapers.com.

Coordinates: 41°23′N71°37′W / 41.39°N 71.62°W / 41.39; -71.62