2020 United States Senate elections

Last updated

2020 United States Senate elections
Flag of the United States (Pantone).svg
  2018 November 3, 2020
January 5, 2021 (Georgia runoffs)
2022  

35 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate
51 [lower-alpha 1] seats needed for a majority
 Majority partyMinority party
  Chuck Schumer official photo (cropped).jpg Mitch McConnell 2016 official photo (cropped).jpg
Leader Chuck Schumer Mitch McConnell
Party Democratic Republican
Leader sinceJanuary 3, 2017January 3, 2007
Leader's seat New York Kentucky
Seats before4553
Seats after48 [lower-alpha 2] 50 [lower-alpha 2]
Seat changeIncrease2.svg 3Decrease2.svg 3
Popular vote41,958,212 [lower-alpha 3] 44,106,711 [lower-alpha 3]
Percentage48.3%50.8%
SwingDecrease2.svg 9.9%Increase2.svg 12.1%
Seats up1223
Races won1520

 Third party
 
Party Independent
Seats before2 [lower-alpha 4]
Seats after2
Seat changeSteady2.svg
Seats up0
Races won0

2020 Senate election results map.svg
Results of the elections:
     Democratic gain     Republican gain
     Democratic hold     Republican hold
     No election
Rectangular inset (Georgia): both seats up for election

Majority Leader before election

Mitch McConnell
Republican

Elected Majority Leader

TBD

The 2020 United States Senate elections were held on November 3, 2020, [1] with the 33 class 2 seats of the Senate contested in regular elections. [2] Of these, 21 were held by Republicans and 12 by Democrats. The winners were elected to six-year terms from January 3, 2021, to January 3, 2027. [3] Two special elections for seats held by Republicans were also held in conjunction with the general elections, with one in Arizona to fill the vacancy created by John McCain's death in 2018 and one in Georgia following Johnny Isakson's resignation in 2019. [4] [5] In both races, the appointed Republican lost to a Democrat. [6] [7]

Contents

In the 2014 United States Senate elections, the last regularly scheduled elections for class 2 Senate seats, the Republicans won nine seats from the Democrats and gained a majority, [8] which they continued to hold after the 2016 and 2018 elections. [9] [10] Before the elections, Republicans held 53 seats, Democrats held 45 seats, and independents caucusing with the Democrats held two seats, which were not up for reelection. [11] Including the special elections in Arizona and Georgia, Republicans defended 23 seats and the Democrats 12. [12]

Democrats needed a net gain of four seats or three and the vice presidency to gain a majority, [lower-alpha 1] [13] which they will have upon Kamala Harris's inauguration as vice president on January 20. Despite record-breaking turnout and fundraising efforts, Democrats underperformed expectations on election night. They only flipped seats in Arizona and Colorado while failing to flip other seats in races that were considered competitive, and they also lost a seat in Alabama. [6] [14] Except in Maine, the winning party in every Senate election was the winning party in the state's presidential election. [15]

Due to election laws in Georgia that require candidates to win at least 50% of the vote in the general election, both races advanced to runoff elections on January 5, 2021. [16] Democrats ultimately won both seats, [7] and the partisan balance in the Senate was tied for the first time since 2001. [17] Vice President-elect Harris's tie-breaking vote will give Democrats control of the chamber by the smallest margin possible after the new administration takes office. [18]

Election summary

PartiesTotal
Democratic Independent Republican
Last election (2018) 45253100
Before this election45253100
Not up3323065
Class 1 (20182024)2121033
Class 3 (20162022)122032
Up122335
Class 2 (2014→2020)122133
Special: class 322
General elections
Incumbent retiring134
Incumbent running111829
Special elections
Appointee running22

Change in composition

Republicans defended 23 seats while Democrats defended 12. [12] Each block represents one of the 100 Senate seats. "D#" is a Democratic senator, "I#" is an Independent senator, and "R#" is a Republican senator. They are arranged so that the parties are separated and a majority is clear by crossing the middle.

Before the elections

Each block indicates an incumbent senator's actions going into the election. Both Independents caucus with the Democrats.

D1D2D3D4D5D6D7D8D9D10
D20D19D18D17D16D15D14D13D12D11
D21D22D23D24D25D26D27D28D29D30
D40
N.H.
Ran
D39
Minn.
Ran
D38
Mich.
Ran
D37
Mass.
Ran
D36
Ill.
Ran
D35
Del.
Ran
D34
Ala.
Ran
D33D32D31
D41
N.J.
Ran
D42
N.M.
Retired
D43
Ore.
Ran
D44
R.I.
Ran
D45
Va.
Ran
I1I2R53
Wyo.
Retired
R52
W.Va.
Ran
R51
Texas
Ran
Majority →R50
Tenn.
Retired
R41
La.
Ran
R42
Maine
Ran
R43
Miss.
Ran
R44
Mont.
Ran
R45
Neb.
Ran
R46
N.C.
Ran
R47
Okla.
Ran
R48
S.C.
Ran
R49
S.D.
Ran
R40
Ky.
Ran
R39
Kan.
Retired
R38
Iowa
Ran
R37
Idaho
Ran
R36
Ga. (sp)
Ran
R35
Ga. (reg)
Ran
R34
Colo.
Ran
R33
Ark.
Ran
R32
Ariz. (sp)
Ran
R31
Alaska
Ran
R21R22R23R24R25R26R27R28R29R30
R20R19R18R17R16R15R14R13R12R11
R1R2R3R4R5R6R7R8R9R10

After the elections

D1D2D3D4D5D6D7D8D9D10
D20D19D18D17D16D15D14D13D12D11
D21D22D23D24D25D26D27D28D29D30
D40
N.J.
Reelected
D39
N.H.
Reelected
D38
Minn.
Reelected
D37
Mich.
Reelected
D36
Mass.
Reelected
D35
Ill.
Reelected
D34
Del.
Reelected
D33D32D31
D41
N.M.
Hold
D42
Ore.
Reelected
D43
R.I.
Reelected
D44
Va.
Reelected
D45
Ariz. (sp)
Gain
D46
Colo.
Gain
D47
Ga. (reg).
Gain
D48
Ga. (sp).
Gain
I1I2
Majority (with independents and Vice President) [lower-alpha 2]
R41
Neb.
Reelected
R42
N.C.
Reelected
R43
Okla.
Reelected
R44
S.C.
Reelected
R45
S.D.
Reelected
R46
Tenn.
Hold
R47
Texas
Reelected
R48
W.Va.
Reelected
R49
Wyo.
Hold
R50
Ala.
Gain
R40
Mont.
Reelected
R39
Miss.
Reelected
R38
Maine
Reelected
R37
La.
Reelected
R36
Ky.
Reelected
R35
Kan.
Hold
R34
Iowa
Reelected
R33
Idaho
Reelected
R32
Ark.
Reelected
R31
Alaska
Reelected
R21R22R23R24R25R26R27R28R29R30
R20R19R18R17R16R15R14R13R12R11
R1R2R3R4R5R6R7R8R9R10
Key:
D# Democratic
R# Republican
I# Independent, caucusing with Democrats

Final pre-election predictions

Several sites and individuals published predictions of competitive seats. These predictions looked at factors such as the strength of the incumbent (if the incumbent was running for reelection) and the other candidates, and the state's partisan lean (reflected in part by the state's Cook Partisan Voting Index rating). The predictions assigned ratings to each seat, indicating the predicted advantage that a party had in winning that seat. Most election predictors used:

ConstituencyIncumbent2020 election ratings
State PVI [19] SenatorLast
election [lower-alpha 5]
Cook
October 29,
2020
[20]
IE
October 28,
2020
[21]
Sabato
November 2,
2020
[22]
Daily Kos
November 2,
2020
[23]
Politico
November 2,
2020
[24]
RCP
October 23,
2020
[25]
DDHQ
November 3,
2020
[26]
538 [lower-alpha 6] [lower-alpha 7]
November 3,
2020
[27]
Economist
November 3,
2020
[28]
Result [29]
Alabama R+14 Doug Jones 50.0% D
(2017 special) [lower-alpha 8]
Lean R (flip)Lean R (flip)Likely R (flip)Likely R (flip)Lean R (flip)Likely R (flip)Safe R (flip)Likely R (flip)Safe R (flip)Tuberville
(60.1%) (flip)
Alaska R+9 Dan Sullivan 48.0% RLean R Lean RLean RLean RLean RLean RLean RLikely RLean RSullivan
(54.3%)
Arizona
(special)
R+5 Martha McSally Appointed
(2019) [lower-alpha 9]
Lean D (flip)Tilt D (flip)Lean D (flip)Lean D (flip)Lean D (flip)TossupLikely D (flip)Likely D (flip)Lean D (flip)Kelly
(51.2%) (flip)
Arkansas R+15 Tom Cotton 56.5% RSafe R Safe RSafe RSafe RSolid RSafe RSafe RSolid RSafe RCotton
(66.6%)
Colorado D+1 Cory Gardner 48.2% RLean D (flip)Lean D (flip)Likely D (flip)Likely D (flip)Lean D (flip)Lean D (flip)Likely D (flip)Likely D (flip)Likely D (flip)Hickenlooper
(53.5%) (flip)
Delaware D+6 Chris Coons 55.8% DSafe D Safe DSafe DSafe DSolid DSafe DSafe DSolid DSafe DCoons
(59.4%)
Georgia
(regular)
R+5 David Perdue 52.9% RTossup TossupTossupTossupTossupTossupTossupTossupTossupOssoff
(50.6%) (flip) [lower-alpha 10]
Georgia
(special)
R+5 Kelly Loeffler Appointed
(2020) [lower-alpha 11]
Tossup TossupTossupTossupLean RLean RTossupLean D (flip)TossupWarnock
(51.0%) (flip) [lower-alpha 10]
Idaho R+19 Jim Risch 65.3% RSafe R Safe RSafe RSafe RSolid RSafe RSafe RSolid RSafe RRisch
(62.6%)
Illinois D+7 Dick Durbin 53.5% DSafe D Safe DSafe DSafe DSolid DSafe DSafe DSolid DSafe DDurbin
(54.6%)
Iowa R+3 Joni Ernst 52.1% RTossup TossupLean RTossupTossupTossupTossupTossupTossupErnst
(51.8%)
Kansas R+13 Pat Roberts
(retiring)
53.1% RLean R Tilt RLean RLean RLean RLean RLean RLikely RLean RMarshall
(53.5%)
Kentucky R+15 Mitch McConnell 56.2% RLikely R Safe RLikely RSafe RLikely RLikely RSafe RSolid RLikely RMcConnell
(57.8%)
Louisiana R+11 Bill Cassidy 55.9% RSafe R Safe RSafe RSafe RSolid RSafe RSafe RSolid RLikely RCassidy
(59.3%)
Maine D+3 Susan Collins 68.5% RTossup Tilt D (flip)Lean D (flip)TossupTossupTossupLean D (flip)TossupLean D (flip)Collins
(51.0%)
Massachusetts D+12 Ed Markey 61.9% DSafe D Safe DSafe DSafe DSolid DSafe DSafe DSolid DSafe DMarkey
(65.8%)
Michigan D+1 Gary Peters 54.6% DLean D Lean DLean DLean DLean DTossupLikely DLikely DLikely DPeters
(49.9%)
Minnesota D+1 Tina Smith 53.0% D
(2018 special) [lower-alpha 12]
Safe D Safe DLikely DLikely DLikely DTossupLikely DSolid DLikely DSmith
(48.8%)
Mississippi R+9 Cindy Hyde-Smith 53.6% R
(2018 special) [lower-alpha 13]
Likely R Safe RLikely RSafe RLikely RLean RLikely RLikely RLikely RHyde-Smith
(55.3%)
Montana R+11 Steve Daines 57.9% RTossup TossupLean RLean RTossupTossupLean RLean RLean RDaines
(54.9%)
Nebraska R+14 Ben Sasse 64.5% RSafe R Safe RSafe RSafe RSolid RSafe RSafe RSolid RSafe RSasse
(64.7%)
New Hampshire D+1 Jeanne Shaheen 51.5% DSafe D Safe DLikely DSafe DLikely DLean DSafe DSolid DSafe DShaheen
(56.7%)
New Jersey D+7 Cory Booker 55.8% DSafe D Safe DSafe DSafe DSolid DLikely DSafe DSolid DSafe DBooker
(56.9%)
New Mexico D+3 Tom Udall
(retiring)
55.6% DSafe D Safe DLikely DSafe DLikely DLean DSafe DLikely DLikely DLuján
(51.7%)
North Carolina R+3 Thom Tillis 48.8% RTossup Tilt D (flip)Lean D (flip)TossupTossupTossupLean D (flip)Lean D (flip)Lean D (flip)Tillis
(48.7%)
Oklahoma R+20 Jim Inhofe 68.0% RSafe R Safe RSafe RSafe RSolid RSafe RSafe RSolid RSafe RInhofe
(62.9%)
Oregon D+5 Jeff Merkley 55.7% DSafe D Safe DSafe DSafe DSolid DSafe DSafe DSolid DSafe DMerkley
(57.0%)
Rhode Island D+10 Jack Reed 70.6% DSafe D Safe DSafe DSafe DSolid DSafe DSafe DSolid DSafe DReed
(66.5%)
South Carolina R+8 Lindsey Graham 55.3% RTossup Tilt RLean RLean RLean RTossupLean RLikely RLean RGraham
(54.5%)
South Dakota R+14 Mike Rounds 50.4% RSafe R Safe RSafe RSafe RSolid RSafe RSafe RSolid RSafe RRounds
(65.7%)
Tennessee R+14 Lamar Alexander
(retiring)
61.9% RSafe R Safe RSafe RSafe RSolid RLikely RSafe RSolid RSafe RHagerty
(62.1%)
Texas R+8 John Cornyn 61.6% RLean R Lean RLean RLean RLean RLean RLikely RLikely RLean RCornyn
(53.6%)
Virginia D+1 Mark Warner 49.1% DSafe D Safe DSafe DSafe DSolid DLikely DSafe DSolid DSafe DWarner
(56.0%)
West Virginia R+19 Shelley Moore Capito 62.1% RSafe R Safe RSafe RSafe RSolid RSafe RSafe RSolid RSafe RCapito
(70.3%)
Wyoming R+25 Mike Enzi
(retiring)
72.2% RSafe R Safe RSafe RSafe RSolid RSafe RSafe RSolid RSafe RLummis
(73.1%)
Overall [lower-alpha 14] D – 48
R – 45
7 tossups
D – 50 [lower-alpha 15]
R – 47
3 tossups
D – 50 [lower-alpha 15]
R – 48
2 tossup
D – 48
R – 47
5 tossups
D – 48
R – 47
5 tossups
D – 45
R – 46
9 tossups
D – 50 [lower-alpha 15]
R – 47
3 tossups
D – 50 [lower-alpha 15]
R – 47
3 tossups
D – 50 [lower-alpha 15]
R – 47
3 tossups
Results:
D – 50 [lower-alpha 2]
R – 50

Election dates

StateFiling deadline for
major party candidates [30] [31]
Filing deadline for
write-in candidates in major party primaries [lower-alpha 16]
Primary
election [30]
Primary
run-off
(if necessary) [30]
Filing deadline for minor
party and unaffiliated candidates [31]
Filing deadline for minor party
and unaffiliated write-in candidates [lower-alpha 17]
General
election
Poll closing
(EST) [32]
Alabama November 8, 2019Ineligible [33] March 3, 2020July 14, 2020March 3, 2020November 3, 2020 [33] November 3, 20208:00pm
Alaska June 1, 2020Ineligible [34] August 18, 2020N/AAugust 18, 2020October 29, 2020 [35] November 3, 20201:00am [lower-alpha 18]
Arizona (special) April 6, 2020June 25, 2020 [36] August 4, 2020N/AApril 6, 2020September 24, 2020 [36] November 3, 20209:00pm
Arkansas November 11, 2019Ineligible [37] March 3, 2020Not necessaryMay 1, 2020August 5, 2020 [37] November 3, 20208:30pm
Colorado March 17, 2020April 24, 2020 [38] June 30, 2020N/AJuly 9, 2020July 16, 2020 [38] November 3, 20209:00pm
Delaware July 14, 2020Ineligible [39] September 15, 2020N/ASeptember 1, 2020September 20, 2020 [40] November 3, 20208:00pm
Georgia (regular) March 6, 2020Ineligible [41] June 9, 2020Not necessaryAugust 14, 2020September 7, 2020 [42] November 3, 2020 [lower-alpha 19] 7:00pm
Georgia (special) March 6, 2020Ineligible [41] November 3, 2020N/AAugust 14, 2020September 7, 2020 [42] January 5, 2021 [lower-alpha 20] 9:00pm
Idaho March 13, 2020May 5, 2020 [43] June 2, 2020N/AMarch 13, 2020October 6, 2020 [43] November 3, 202010:00pm
Illinois December 2, 2019January 2, 2020 [44] March 17, 2020N/AJuly 20, 2020September 3, 2020 [44] November 3, 20208:00pm
Iowa March 13, 2020June 2, 2020 [45] June 2, 2020Not necessaryMarch 13, 2020November 3, 2020 [45] November 3, 202010:00pm
Kansas June 1, 2020Not necessary [lower-alpha 21] [46] August 4, 2020N/AAugust 3, 2020November 3, 2020 [47] November 3, 20209:00pm
Kentucky January 10, 2020Ineligible [48] June 23, 2020N/AJune 2, 2020October 23, 2020 [49] November 3, 20207:00pm
Louisiana July 24, 2020Ineligible [50] November 3, 2020N/AJuly 24, 2020Ineligible [51] Not necessary9:00pm
Maine March 16, 2020April 10, 2020 [52] July 14, 2020N/AJune 1, 2020September 4, 2020 [52] November 3, 20208:00pm
Massachusetts May 5, 2020September 1, 2020 [53] September 1, 2020N/AAugust 25, 2020November 3, 2020 [53] November 3, 20208:00pm
Michigan May 8, 2020July 24, 2020 [54] August 4, 2020N/AAugust 4, 2020October 23, 2020 [54] November 3, 20208:00pm
Minnesota June 2, 2020May 19, 2020 [55] August 11, 2020N/AJune 2, 2020October 27, 2020 [55] November 3, 20209:00pm
Mississippi January 10, 2020Not necessary [lower-alpha 22] [56] March 10, 2020Not necessaryJanuary 10, 2020November 3, 2020 [lower-alpha 23] [56] November 3, 20208:00pm
Montana March 9, 2020April 8, 2020 [57] June 2, 2020N/AJune 1, 2020September 9, 2020 [57] November 3, 202010:00pm
Nebraska March 2, 2020May 1, 2020 [58] May 12, 2020N/AAugust 3, 2020October 23, 2020 [58] November 3, 20209:00pm
New Hampshire June 12, 2020September 8, 2020 [59] September 8, 2020N/ASeptember 2, 2020November 3, 2020 [60] November 3, 20208:00pm
New Jersey March 30, 2020July 7, 2020 [61] July 7, 2020N/AJuly 7, 2020November 3, 2020 [61] November 3, 20208:00pm
New Mexico March 10, 2020March 17, 2020 [62] June 2, 2020N/AJune 25, 2020June 26, 2020 [63] November 3, 20209:00pm
North Carolina December 20, 2019Ineligible [64] March 3, 2020Not necessaryMarch 3, 2020July 21, 2020 [65] November 3, 20207:30pm
Oklahoma April 10, 2020Ineligible [66] June 30, 2020Not necessaryApril 10, 2020Ineligible [51] November 3, 20208:00pm
Oregon March 10, 2020May 19, 2020 [67] May 19, 2020N/AAugust 25, 2020November 3, 2020 [67] November 3, 202010:00pm
Rhode Island June 24, 2020September 8, 2020 [68] September 8, 2020N/AJune 24, 2020November 3, 2020 [68] November 3, 20208:00pm
South Carolina March 30, 2020Ineligible [69] June 9, 2020Not necessaryJuly 20, 2020November 3, 2020 [70] November 3, 20207:00pm
South Dakota March 31, 2020Ineligible [51] June 2, 2020Not necessaryApril 28, 2020Ineligible [51] November 3, 20208:00pm
Tennessee April 2, 2020June 17, 2020 [71] August 6, 2020N/AApril 2, 2020September 14, 2020 [72] November 3, 20208:00pm
Texas December 9, 2019Ineligible [73] March 3, 2020July 14, 2020August 13, 2020 [lower-alpha 24] August 17, 2020 [74] November 3, 20208:00pm
Virginia March 26, 2020Ineligible [75] June 23, 2020N/AJune 23, 2020November 3, 2020 [76] November 3, 20207:00pm
West Virginia January 25, 2020Ineligible [77] June 9, 2020N/AJuly 31, 2020September 15, 2020 [78] November 3, 20207:30pm
Wyoming May 29, 2020August 18, 2020 [lower-alpha 25] [79] August 18, 2020N/AAugust 25, 2020November 3, 2020 [80] November 3, 20209:00pm

Race summary

Special elections during the preceding Congress

In each special election, the winner's term begins immediately after their election is certified by their state's government.

Elections are sorted by date then state.

State
(linked to
summaries below)
IncumbentResultsCandidates
SenatorPartyElectoral history
Arizona
(Class 3)
Martha McSally Republican2019 (Appointed)Incumbent lost election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Georgia
(Class 3)
Kelly Loeffler Republican2020 (Appointed)Incumbent lost election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.

Elections leading to the next Congress

In each general election, the winner is elected for the term beginning January 3, 2021.

State
(linked to
summaries below)
IncumbentResultsCandidates
SenatorPartyElectoral history
Alabama Doug Jones Democratic 2017 (Special) Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
Alaska Dan Sullivan Republican 2014 Incumbent reelected.
  • Green check.svgY Dan Sullivan (Republican) 53.9%
  • Al Gross (Independent) 41.2%
  • John Wayne Howe (Alaskan Independence) 4.7%
Arkansas Tom Cotton Republican 2014 Incumbent reelected.
  • Green check.svgY Tom Cotton (Republican) 66.5%
  • Ricky Dale Harrington, Jr. (Libertarian) 33.5%
Colorado Cory Gardner Republican 2014 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
  • Green check.svgY John Hickenlooper (Democratic) 53.5%
  • Cory Gardner (Republican) 44.2%
  • Raymon Doane (Libertarian) 1.7%
  • Daniel Doyle (Approval Voting) 0.3%
  • Stephan "Seku" Evans (Unity) 0.3%
Delaware Chris Coons Democratic 2010 (Special)
2014
Incumbent reelected.
  • Green check.svgY Chris Coons (Democratic) 59.4%
  • Lauren Witzke (Republican) 37.9%
  • Mark Turley (Delaware Independent) 1.6%
  • Nadine Frost (Libertarian) 1.1%
Georgia David Perdue Republican 2014 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Idaho Jim Risch Republican 2008
2014
Incumbent reelected.
  • Green check.svgY Jim Risch (Republican) 62.6%
  • Paulette Jordan (Democratic) 33.3%
  • Natalie Fleming (Independent) 2.9%
  • Ray Writz (Constitution) 1.2%
Illinois Dick Durbin Democratic 1996
2002
2008
2014
Incumbent reelected.
Iowa Joni Ernst Republican 2014 Incumbent reelected.
Kansas Pat Roberts Republican 1996
2002
2008
2014
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican hold.
Kentucky Mitch McConnell Republican 1984
1990
1996
2002
2008
2014
Incumbent reelected.
Louisiana Bill Cassidy Republican 2014 Incumbent reelected.
  • Green check.svgY Bill Cassidy (Republican) 59.3%
  • Adrian Perkins (Democratic) 19%
  • Champ Edwards (Democratic) 11.1%
  • Antoine Pierce (Democratic) 2.7%
  • Dustin Murphy (Republican) 1.9%
  • Drew David Knight (Democratic) 1.8%
  • Beryl Billiot (Independent) 0.8%
  • John Paul Bourgeois (Independent) 0.8%
  • Peter Wenstrup (Democratic) 0.7%
  • Aaron Sigler (Libertarian) 0.5%
  • Vinny Mendoza (Independent) 0.4%
  • Melinda Mary Price (Independent) 0.4%
  • Jamar Montgomery (Independent) 0.3%
  • Reno Daret III (Independent) 0.2%
  • Xan John (Independent) 0.1%
Maine Susan Collins Republican 1996
2002
2008
2014
Incumbent reelected.
Massachusetts Ed Markey Democratic 2013 (Special)
2014
Incumbent reelected.
  • Green check.svgY Ed Markey (Democratic) 66.2%
  • Kevin O'Connor (Republican) 33%
  • Write-ins 0.8%
Michigan Gary Peters Democratic 2014 Incumbent reelected.
  • Green check.svgY Gary Peters (Democratic) 49.9%
  • John James (Republican) 48.2%
  • Valerie Willis (U.S. Taxpayers) 0.9%
  • Marcia Squier (Green) 0.7%
  • Doug Dern (Natural Law) 0.2%
Minnesota Tina Smith Democratic2018 (Appointed)
2018 (Special)
Incumbent reelected.
  • Green check.svgY Tina Smith (Democratic) 48.8%
  • Jason Lewis (Republican) 43.5%
  • Kevin O'Connor (Legal Marijuana Now) 5.9%
  • Oliver Steinberg (Legalize Cannabis) 1.8%
Mississippi Cindy Hyde-Smith Republican2018 (Appointed)
2018 (Special)
Incumbent reelected.
Montana Steve Daines Republican 2014 Incumbent reelected.
Nebraska Ben Sasse Republican 2014 Incumbent reelected.
  • Green check.svgY Ben Sasse (Republican) 59.6%
  • Chris Janicek (Democratic) 23.2%
  • Preston Love Jr. (Democratic) (write-in) 11.6%
  • Gene Siadek (Libertarian) 5.6%
New Hampshire Jeanne Shaheen Democratic 2008
2014
Incumbent reelected.
  • Green check.svgY Jeanne Shaheen (Democratic) 56.7%
  • Corky Messner (Republican) 41%
  • Justin O'Donnell (Libertarian) 2.3%
New Jersey Cory Booker Democratic 2013 (Special)
2014
Incumbent reelected.
  • Green check.svgY Cory Booker (Democratic) 57.2%
  • Rik Mehta (Republican) 40.9%
  • Madelyn R. Hoffman (Green) 0.9%
  • Veronica Fernandez (Of, By, For!) 0.7%
  • Daniel Burke (LaRouche was Right) 0.3%


New Mexico Tom Udall Democratic 2008
2014
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic hold.
  • Green check.svgY Ben Ray Luján (Democratic) 51.7%
  • Mark Ronchetti (Republican) 45.6%
  • Bob Walsh (Libertarian) 2.6%
North Carolina Thom Tillis Republican 2014 Incumbent reelected.
  • Green check.svgY Thom Tillis (Republican) 48.7%
  • Cal Cunningham (Democratic) 46.9%
  • Shannon Bray (Libertarian) 3.1%
  • Kevin Hayes (Constitution) 1.2%
Oklahoma Jim Inhofe Republican 1994 (Special)
1996
2002
2008
2014
Incumbent reelected.
  • Green check.svgY Jim Inhofe (Republican) 62.9%
  • Abby Broyles (Democratic) 32.8%
  • Robert Murphy (Libertarian) 2.2%
  • Joan Farr (Independent) 1.4%
  • A. D. Nesbit (Independent) 0.7%
Oregon Jeff Merkley Democratic 2008
2014
Incumbent reelected.
  • Green check.svgY Jeff Merkley (Democratic) 56.9%
  • Jo Rae Perkins (Republican) 39.3%
  • Gary Dye (Libertarian) 1.8%
  • Ibrahim Taher (Pacific Green) 1.8%
  • Write-ins 0.1%
Rhode Island Jack Reed Democratic 1996
2002
2008
2014
Incumbent reelected.
  • Green check.svgY Jack Reed (Democratic) 66.6%
  • Allen Waters (Republican) 33.4%
South Carolina Lindsey Graham Republican 2002
2008
2014
Incumbent reelected.


South Dakota Mike Rounds Republican 2014 Incumbent reelected.
Tennessee Lamar Alexander Republican 2002
2008
2014
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican hold.
  • Green check.svgY Bill Hagerty (Republican) 62.2%
  • Marquita Bradshaw (Democratic) 35.2%
  • Elizabeth McLeod (Independent) 0.6%
  • Yomi Faparusi (Independent) 0.4%
  • Steven Hooper (Independent) 0.3%
  • Kacey Morgan (Independent) 0.3%
  • Ronnie Henley (Independent) 0.3%
  • Aaron James (Independent) 0.2%
  • Eric Stansberry (Independent) 0.2%
  • Dean Hill (Independent) 0.2%
  • Jeffrey Grunau (Independent) 0.1%
Texas John Cornyn Republican 2002
2008
2014
Incumbent reelected.
  • Green check.svgY John Cornyn (Republican) 53.5%
  • MJ Hegar (Democratic) 43.9%
  • Kerry McKennon (Libertarian) 1.9%
  • David B. Collins (Green) 0.7%
Virginia Mark Warner Democratic 2008
2014
Incumbent reelected.
West Virginia Shelley Moore Capito Republican 2014 Incumbent reelected.
Wyoming Mike Enzi Republican 1996
2002
2008
2014
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican hold.

Closest races

12 races had a margin of victory under 10%:

StateParty of winnerMargin
Georgia (regular) Democratic (flip)1.06% [lower-alpha 26]
Michigan Democratic1.68%
North Carolina Republican1.75%
Georgia (special) Democratic (flip)1.91%
Arizona (special) Democratic (flip)2.35%
Minnesota Democratic5.24%
New Mexico Democratic6.11%
Iowa Republican6.59%
Maine Republican8.59%
Colorado Democratic (flip)9.32%
Texas Republican9.64%
Mississippi Republican9.97%

Alabama

Alabama election
Flag of Alabama.svg
2026  
  Tommy-Tuberville-Coaches-Tour-5-29-08-(cropped).jpg Senator Doug Jones official photo (cropped 2).jpg
Nominee Tommy Tuberville Doug Jones
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote1,392,076920,478
Percentage60.1%39.7%

U.S. senator before election

Doug Jones
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Tommy Tuberville
Republican

Incumbent Democrat Doug Jones was elected in a special election in 2017, narrowly defeating Republican nominee Roy Moore. [82] [83] He ran for a full term in 2020, losing to Republican Tommy Tuberville in a landslide.

Tuberville is a former football head coach for Auburn University. He defeated former senator and attorney general Jeff Sessions in a July 14 runoff to secure the Republican nomination, after securing President Donald Trump's endorsement. Sessions occupied the seat until 2017 when he resigned to become attorney general in the Trump administration.

Alabama is one of the country's most Republican states, and Jones's win was in part due to sexual assault allegations against nominee Roy Moore during the special election; most analysts expected the seat to flip back to GOP control. Tuberville defeated Jones by more than 20 percentage points. [84]

Alaska

Alaska election
Flag of Alaska.svg
  2014
2026  
  Senator Dan Sullivan official (cropped).jpg 3x4.svg
Nominee Dan Sullivan Al Gross [lower-alpha 27]
Party Republican Independent
Popular vote191,112146,068
Percentage53.90%41.19%

U.S. senator before election

Dan Sullivan
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Dan Sullivan
Republican

One-term Republican Dan Sullivan was elected in 2014, defeating incumbent Democrat Mark Begich. He defeated independent challenger Al Gross to win a second term in office. [85]

Potential Democratic candidates included Begich, who was the Democratic nominee for governor of Alaska in 2018, and Anchorage mayor Ethan Berkowitz, who was the Democratic nominee for governor of Alaska in 2010. One Democrat, Edgar Blatchford, filed to run by the June 1 filing deadline. [86]

Gross, an orthopedic surgeon and fisherman, declared his candidacy on July 2, 2019. as an Independent. [87] He participated in a joint primary for the Alaska Democratic Party, Alaska Libertarian Party and Alaskan Independence Party, winning the nomination as an independent supported by the Democratic Party.

Most people though that it could be close, but Sullivan defeated Gross by 13.7 percentage points. [88]

Arizona (special)

Arizona special election
Flag of Arizona.svg
  2016
2022  
  Mark Kelly (2016).jpg Sen. Martha McSally official Senate headshot 116th congress (cropped).jpg
Nominee Mark Kelly Martha McSally
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote1,716,4671,637,661
Percentage51.2%48.8%

U.S. senator before election

Martha McSally
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Mark Kelly
Democratic

Six-term Republican John McCain was reelected in 2016 but died in office on August 25, 2018. [89] Republican governor Doug Ducey appointed former senator Jon Kyl to fill the seat temporarily. [90] After Kyl stepped down at the end of the year, Ducey appointed outgoing U.S. Representative Martha McSally to replace him after she lost the election to the other Arizona senate seat. [91] McSally ran in the 2020 special election to fill the remaining two years of the term, [92] losing to Democrat Mark Kelly, a former astronaut.

Once a solidly Republican state, Arizona trended more purple in the late 2010s. Incumbent Republican Martha McSally was appointed to the late John McCain's seat two months after losing the 2018 Arizona U.S. Senate election to Democrat Kyrsten Sinema. Her Democratic opponent, astronaut Mark Kelly, raised significantly more money and generally led her by 5 to 15 points in the polling. McSally also suffered from low approval ratings due to her strong allegiance to Trump, who was unpopular in Arizona despite having won the state by 3.5 points in 2016. [93]

Arkansas

Arkansas election
Flag of Arkansas.svg
  2014
2026  
  Tom Cotton official Senate photo (cropped).jpg Ricky Dale Harrington Jr (cropped).jpg
Nominee Tom Cotton Ricky Dale Harrington Jr.
Party Republican Libertarian
Popular vote793,871399,390
Percentage66.5%33.5%

U.S. senator before election

Tom Cotton
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Tom Cotton
Republican

One-term Republican Tom Cotton was elected in 2014 after serving two years in the United States House of Representatives, defeating incumbent Democratic senator Mark Pryor by a comfortable margin. Cotton was reelected to a second term by a 33-point margin, defeating Libertarian Ricky Dale Harrington Jr [94] [95] [96]

Joshua Mahony, a nonprofit executive and 2018 Democratic nominee for Congress in Arkansas's 3rd congressional district, filed to run for the Democratic nomination, [97] but dropped out just after the filing deadline. [98] No other Democrats filed within the filing deadline. Progressive activist Dan Whitfield ran as an independent but suspended his campaign on October 1, 2020, after failing to qualify for the ballot. [99]

Colorado

Colorado election
Flag of Colorado.svg
  2014
2026  
  John Hickenlooper June 2019.jpg Cory Gardner official Senate portrait (cropped).jpeg
Nominee John Hickenlooper Cory Gardner
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote1,731,1141,429,492
Percentage53.5%44.2%

U.S. senator before election

Cory Gardner
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

John Hickenlooper
Democratic

One-term Republican Cory Gardner was elected in 2014 after serving four years in the United States House of Representatives, narrowly defeating one-term Democrat Mark Udall. Gardner sought a second term but lost to Democrat John Hickenlooper by 9.3 percentage points. [100]

Hickenlooper is a popular former governor of Colorado, and led Gardner by as much as 20 percentage points in polls, with most pundits considering him a heavy favorite. Gardner was Colorado's only Republican statewide officeholder, and the once purple state has trended increasingly Democratic since his narrow win in 2014. Gardner also had low approval ratings due to his strong allegiance to Trump, who lost Colorado in 2016 to Hillary Clinton by 4.9%, and in 2020 to Joe Biden by 13.5%. [101] [102] Hickenlooper also raised significantly more money than Gardner. [103]

Delaware

Delaware election
Flag of Delaware.svg
  2014
2026  
  Chris Coons, official portrait, 112th Congress (cropped).jpg 3x4.svg
Nominee Chris Coons Lauren Witzke
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote291,804186,054
Percentage59.4%37.9%

U.S. senator before election

Chris Coons
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Chris Coons
Democratic

One-term Democrat Chris Coons was reelected in 2014; he first took office after winning a 2010 special election, which occurred after longtime senator Joe Biden resigned to become vice president of the United States (Biden also won the 2020 presidential election and is now president-elect). He faced an unsuccessful primary challenge from technology executive Jessica Scarane. Conservative activist Lauren Witzke and attorney Jim DeMartino ran for the Republican nomination.

The Delaware primary was held on September 15, 2020. [104]

Georgia

Due to Republican Senator Johnny Isakson's resignation from office for health reasons in 2019, both of Georgia's Senate seats were up for election in November 2020. [105] The state had tilted Republican in Senate races since the mid-1990s, but increased support for Democrats in populous suburbs has made office elections more competitive; a close governor's race, multiple close U.S. House races, and many other close local office races resulted in Democratic gains in 2018 elections. Both the regular and special election were considered highly competitive toss-ups. [106] National attention was in the state as the balance of power was at the hands of the voters in Georgia.

Georgia (regular)

Georgia regular election
Flag of Georgia (U.S. state).svg
  2014 November 3, 2020 (first round)
January 5, 2021 (runoff)
2026  
  Jon Ossoff 2020 2 (cropped).jpg David Perdue, Official Portrait, 114th Congress (cropped).jpg
Nominee Jon Ossoff David Perdue
Party Democratic Republican
First round2,374,519
47.9%
2,462,617
49.7%
Runoff 2,268,612
50.61%
2,213,604
49.39%

U.S. senator before election

David Perdue
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Jon Ossoff
Democratic

One-term Republican David Perdue was elected in 2014, and sought a second term. [107]

Jon Ossoff, a former congressional candidate, documentary film producer, and investigative journalist, defeated former Columbus mayor Teresa Tomlinson and 2018 lieutenant governor nominee Sarah Riggs Amico in the Democratic primary to secure nomination. [108] [109] He faced incumbent Republican David Perdue in the November 3 election.

In the November election, no candidate received 50% or more of the total vote; per Georgia law, the election advanced to a runoff between the top two finishers, Ossoff and Perdue, on January 5, 2021. Ossoff was projected the winner on January 6, [110] and Perdue conceded on January 8. [111]

Georgia (special)

2020–21 United States Senate special election in Georgia
Flag of Georgia (U.S. state).svg
  2016 November 3, 2020 (first round)
January 5, 2021 (runoff)
2022  
  Raphael Warnock for Senate (cropped).jpg Kelly Loeffler (cropped).jpg
Candidate Raphael Warnock Kelly Loeffler
Party Democratic Republican
First round1,617,035
32.9%
1,273,214
25.9%
Runoff 2,287,787
51.04%
2,194,480
48.96%

U.S. senator before election

Kelly Loeffler
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Raphael Warnock
Democratic

Three-term Senator Johnny Isakson announced on August 28, 2019, that he would resign from the Senate on December 31, 2019, citing health concerns. [112] Georgia governor Brian Kemp appointed Republican Kelly Loeffler to replace Isakson until a regular election could be held; Loeffler took office on January 6, 2020, and competed in the November 2020 election to retain her seat. [113]

Other Republicans who ran for the seat included Wayne Johnson, former chief operating officer of the Office of Federal Student Aid, [114] and four-term U.S. representative Doug Collins. [115]

A "jungle primary" was held November 3, 2020, but no candidate won more than 50% of the vote, so a runoff election between the top two finishers, Loeffler and Democratic challenger Raphael Warnock, was held on January 5, 2021. [116] Warnock defeated Loeffler, who initially refused to concede and vowed to challenge the outcome, [117] but conceded on January 7, after the storming of the U.S. Capitol. [118]

Idaho

Idaho election
Flag of Idaho.svg
  2014
2026  
  Jim Risch 113th Congress.jpg PauletteJordanIF17 (cropped).JPG
Nominee Jim Risch Paulette Jordan
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote537,446285,864
Percentage62.6%33.3%

U.S. senator before election

Jim Risch
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Jim Risch
Republican

Republican Jim Risch successfully ran for a third term in 2020, defeating Democrat Paulette Jordan by a landslide. Jordan is a former gubernatorial nominee and former Coeur d'Alene Tribal Councilwoman.

Illinois

Illinois election
Flag of Illinois.svg
  2014
2026  
  Richard Durbin official photo (cropped).jpg 3x4.svg
Nominee Dick Durbin Mark Curran
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote3,278,9302,319,870
Percentage54.9%38.9%

U.S. senator before election

Dick Durbin
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Dick Durbin
Democratic

Democrat Dick Durbin, the Senate minority whip, easily won a fifth term in office, defeating Republican Mark Curran by a 16-point margin. [119]

Curran served as sheriff of Lake County from 2006 to 2018 and won the Republican primary with 41.55% of the vote. [120]

Antiwar activist Marilyn Jordan Lawlor [121] and state representative Anne Stava-Murray [122] briefly challenged Durbin in the Democratic primary, but both ended up withdrawing. [123] [124]

2019 Chicago mayoral candidate Willie Wilson, a businessman and perennial candidate, ran as a member of the "Willie Wilson Party," with the backing of a handful of Chicago aldermen and the Chicago Police Union.

Iowa

Iowa election
Flag of Iowa.svg
  2014
2026