List of United States senators from Alabama

Last updated

Current delegation

Alabama was admitted to the Union on December 14, 1819. The state elects U.S. senators to Class 2 and Class 3. Its United States Senate seats were declared vacant from March 1861 to July 1868 due to its secession from the Union during the American Civil War. Alabama's current U.S. senators are Republicans Richard Shelby (since 1987) and Tommy Tuberville (since 2021).

Contents

List of senators

Class 2

Class 2 U.S. senators belong to the electoral cycle that were first elected for two United States Congresses in the election of 1819; then the seat was contested again for the 18th, 21st and every three Congresses (six years) thereafter. Those seats in recent years have been contested in 2008, 2014, 2017 (special election) and 2020. The next election will be in 2026.

C

Class 3

Class 3 U.S. senators belong to the electoral cycle that were first elected for three U.S. Congresses in the election of 1819; then the seat was contested again for the 19th, 22nd and every three Congresses (six years) thereafter. Those seats in recent years have been contested in 1998, 2004, 2010 and 2016. The next election will be in 2022.

#SenatorPartyDates in officeElectoral historyTTElectoral historyDates in officePartySenator#
1 William Rufus DeVane King 1839 portrait.jpg
William R. King
Democratic-
Republican
December 14, 1819 –
April 15, 1844
Elected in 1819.1 16th 1 Elected in 1819.

Resigned.
December 14, 1819 –
December 12, 1822
Democratic-
Republican
John Williams Walker.jpg
John Williams Walker
1
17th
Elected to finish Walker's term.

Retired.
December 12, 1822 –
March 3, 1825
Democratic-
Republican
William Kelly 2
Re-elected in 1822.2 18th
Jacksonian 19th 2Elected in 1824 or 1825.

Died.
March 4, 1825 –
January 24, 1826
Jacksonian Henry H. Chambers.jpg
Henry H. Chambers
3
 January 24, 1826 –
February 17, 1826
Vacant
Appointed to continue Chambers's term.

Successor elected.
February 17, 1826 –
November 27, 1826
Jacksonian Pickensisrael.jpg
Israel Pickens
4
Elected to finish Chambers's term.

Lost re-election.
November 27, 1826 –
March 3, 1831
Jacksonian John McKinley.jpg
John McKinley
5
20th
Re-elected in 1828.3 21st
22nd 3 Elected in 1831.

Lost re-election.
March 4, 1831 –
March 3, 1837
Jacksonian Gabrielmoore.jpg
Gabriel Moore
6
23rd Anti-Jacksonian
Re-elected in 1834.4 24th
Democratic 25th 4 Elected in 1837.

Resigned to become a Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.
March 4, 1837 –
April 22, 1837
Democratic John McKinley.jpg
John McKinley
7
 April 22, 1837 –
June 19, 1837
Vacant
Elected to finish McKinley's term.

Resigned.
June 19, 1837 –
November 15, 1841
Democratic Clement Comer Clay.jpg
Clement Comer Clay
8
26th
Re-elected in 1840.

Resigned to become U.S. Minister to France.
5 27th
 November 15, 1841 –
November 24, 1841
Vacant
Elected to finish Clay's term.November 24, 1841 –
June 16, 1848
Democratic Arthur bagby.jpg
Arthur P. Bagby
9
28th 5 Re-elected in 1842.

Resigned to become U.S. Minister to Russia.
VacantApril 15, 1844 –
April 22, 1844
 
2 DixonHallLewis.jpg
Dixon Hall Lewis
Democratic April 22, 1844 –
October 24, 1848
Appointed to finish King's term.
29th
Elected in 1847.

Died.
6 30th
 June 16, 1848 –
July 1, 1848
Vacant
Appointed to continue Bagby's term.

Elected to finish Bagby's term.
July 1, 1848 –
December 20, 1852
Democratic William Rufus DeVane King 1839 portrait.jpg
William R. King
10
VacantOctober 24, 1848 –
November 25, 1848
 
3 BenFitz.jpg
Benjamin Fitzpatrick
Democratic November 25, 1848 –
November 30, 1849
Appointed to continue Lewis's term.

Successor elected.
31st 6Re-elected in 1848 or 1849.

Resigned due to poor health.
4 Jeremiah Clemens.jpg
Jeremiah Clemens
Democratic November 30, 1849 –
March 3, 1853
Elected to finish Lewis's term.

Lost re-election.
32nd
 December 20, 1852 –
January 14, 1853
Vacant
Appointed to continue King's term.

Elected November 28, 1853 [1] to finish King's term.
January 14, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
Democratic BenFitz.jpg
Benjamin Fitzpatrick
11
VacantMarch 4, 1853 –
November 29, 1853
Legislature failed to elect.7 33rd
5 Clement C Clay.png
Clement Claiborne Clay
Democratic November 29, 1853 –
January 21, 1861
Elected late in 1853.
34th 7Legislature failed to elect.March 4, 1855 –
November 26, 1855
Vacant
Elected late.

Withdrew. [lower-alpha 1]
November 26, 1855 –
January 21, 1861
Democratic BenFitz.jpg
Benjamin Fitzpatrick
35th
Re-elected in 1858.

Withdrew. [lower-alpha 1]
8 36th
VacantJanuary 21, 1861 –
July 13, 1868
Civil War and Reconstruction Civil War and Reconstruction January 21, 1861 –
July 13, 1868
Vacant
37th 8
38th
9 39th
40th 9
6 Willard Warner.jpeg
Willard Warner
Republican July 13, 1868 –
March 3, 1871
Elected in 1868 to finish vacant term.

Lost re-election.
Elected in 1868 to finish vacant term.July 13, 1868 –
March 3, 1879
Republican George E. Spencer - Brady-Handy.jpg
George E. Spencer
12
41st
7 George Goldthwaite.jpg
George Goldthwaite
Democratic March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1877
Elected in 1870.

Retired.
10 42nd
43rd 10 Re-elected in 1872.

Retired.
44th
8 John t morgan.jpg
John Tyler Morgan
Democratic March 4, 1877 –
June 11, 1907
Elected in 1876.11 45th
46th 11 Elected in 1878.

Died.
March 4, 1879 –
December 31, 1879
Democratic George S. Houston - Brady-Handy.jpg
George S. Houston
13
 December 31, 1879 –
January 7, 1880
Vacant
Appointed to continue Houston's term.

Successor qualified.
January 7, 1880 –
November 23, 1880
Democratic Luke Pryor.jpeg
Luke Pryor
14
Elected to finish Houston's term.November 24, 1880 –
March 3, 1897
Democratic James Lawrence Pugh.jpg
James L. Pugh
15
47th
Re-elected in 1882.12 48th
49th 12 Re-elected in 1884.
50th
Re-elected in 1888.13 51st
52nd 13 Re-elected in 1890.

Lost renomination. [2]
53rd
Re-elected in 1894.14 54th
55th 14 Elected in 1897. [3] March 4, 1897 –
July 27, 1907
Democratic Edmund Pettus-photo portrait.jpeg
Edmund Pettus
16
56th
Re-elected in 1900.15 57th
58th 15 Re-elected January 26, 1903.

Re-elected early in 1907, [4] [5] but died.
59th
Re-elected January 22, 1907. [4] [5]

Died.
16 60th
VacantJune 11, 1907 –
June 18, 1907
 
9 JohnHBankhead.jpg
John H. Bankhead
Democratic June 18, 1907 –
March 1, 1920
Appointed to continue Morgan's term.

Elected July 16, 1907, to finish Morgan's term.
 July 27, 1907 –
August 6, 1907
Vacant
Elected to finish Pettus's term.August 6, 1907 –
August 8, 1913
Democratic Joseph F Johnston-photo portrait.jpg
Joseph F. Johnston
17
61st 16 Elected August 6, 1907, to next term.

Died.
62nd
Re-elected early January 17, 1911.17 63rd
Henry D. Clayton (D) was appointed August 12, 1913, to continue the term, but his appointment was challenged and withdrawn.
Franklin P. Glass (D) was appointed November 17, 1913, to continue the term, but the Senate refused to seat him. [6]
August 8, 1913 –
May 11, 1914
Vacant
Elected to finish Johnston's term.

Retired.
May 11, 1914 –
March 3, 1915
Democratic Francis S. White.jpeg
Francis S. White
18
64th 17 Elected in 1914.March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1927
Democratic OWUnderwood.jpg
Oscar Underwood
19
65th
Re-elected in 1918.

Died.
18 66th
VacantMarch 1, 1920 –
March 5, 1920
 
10 Braxton Bragg Comer.jpg
B. B. Comer
Democratic March 5, 1920 –
November 2, 1920
Appointed to continue Bankhead's term.

Successor elected.
11 James Thomas Heflin.jpg
James Thomas Heflin
Democratic November 3, 1920 –
March 3, 1931
First elected to finish Bankhead's term.
67th 18 Re-elected in 1920.

Retired.
68th
Re-elected in 1924.

Disqualified.
19 69th
70th 19 Elected in 1926.March 4, 1927 –
August 19, 1937
Democratic HugoLaFayetteBlack.jpg
Hugo Black
20
71st
12 John H Bankhead II.jpg
John H. Bankhead II
Democratic March 4, 1931 –
June 12, 1946
Elected in 1930.20 72nd
73rd 20 Re-elected in 1932.

Resigned to become a Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.
74th
Re-elected in 1936.21 75th
Appointed (by her husband, the Governor) to finish Black's term.

Resigned when her successor won the Democratic primary.
August 20, 1937 –
January 10, 1938
Democratic SenatorDixieBibbGraves.jpg
Dixie Bibb Graves
21
Appointed to continue Graves's term.

Elected April 26, 1938 to finish Graves's term.
January 11, 1938 –
January 3, 1969
Democratic Listerhill.jpg
J. Lister Hill
22
76th 21 Re-elected in 1938.
77th
Re-elected in 1942.

Died.
22 78th
79th
VacantJune 12, 1946 –
June 15, 1946
 
13 George Robinson Swift.jpg
George R. Swift
Democratic June 15, 1946 –
November 5, 1946
Appointed to continue Bankhead's term.

Successor elected.
14 Alabama Sen. John Sparkman.jpg
John Sparkman
Democratic November 6, 1946 –
January 3, 1979
Elected to finish Bankhead's term.
22 Re-elected in 1944.
80th
Re-elected in 1948.23 81st
82nd 23 Re-elected in 1950.
83rd
Re-elected in 1954.24 84th
85th 24 Re-elected in 1956.
86th
Re-elected in 1960.25 87th
88th 25 Re-elected in 1962.

Retired.
89th
Re-elected in 1966.26 90th
91st 26 Elected in 1968.January 3, 1969 –
June 1, 1978
Democratic JamesAllenVA.jpg
James Allen
23
92nd
Re-elected in 1972.

Retired.
27 93rd
94th 27 Re-elected in 1974.

Died.
95th
Appointed to continue her husband's term.

Lost nomination to finish her husband's term.
June 8, 1978 –
November 7, 1978
Democratic Maryon pittman allen.jpg
Maryon Pittman Allen
24
Elected to finish James Allen's term.

Lost renomination; resigned one day early to give his successor advantageous seniority.
November 7, 1978 –
January 2, 1981
Democratic Donald W. Stewart.jpg
Donald Stewart
25
15 Heflin.jpg
Howell Heflin
Democratic January 3, 1979 –
January 3, 1997
Elected in 1978.28 96th
Appointed to finish Stewart's term, having already been elected to the next term.January 2, 1981 –
January 3, 1987
Republican JeremiahDentonSenate.jpg
Jeremiah Denton
26
97th 28 Elected in 1980.

Lost re-election.
98th
Re-elected in 1984.29 99th
100th 29 Elected in 1986.January 3, 1987 –
November 9, 1994
Democratic Richard Shelby official portrait.JPG
Richard Shelby
27
101st
Re-elected in 1990.

Retired.
30 102nd
103rd 30 Re-elected in 1992. Changed party in 1994 with the Republican Revolution.
November 9, 1994 –
Present
Republican
104th
16 Jeff Sessions official portrait.jpg
Jeff Sessions
Republican January 3, 1997 –
February 8, 2017
Elected in 1996.31 105th
106th 31 Re-elected in 1998.
107th
Re-elected in 2002.32 108th
109th 32 Re-elected in 2004.
110th
Re-elected in 2008.33 111th
112th 33 Re-elected in 2010.
113th
Re-elected in 2014.

Resigned to become U.S. Attorney General.
34 114th
115th 34 Re-elected in 2016.
17 Luther Strange official portrait.jpg
Luther Strange
Republican February 9, 2017 –
January 3, 2018
Appointed to continue Sessions's term.

Lost nomination to finish Sessions's term.
18 Senator Doug Jones official photo (cropped) 2.jpg
Doug Jones
Democratic January 3, 2018 –
January 3, 2021
Elected December 12, 2017 to finish Sessions's term.

Lost re-election.
116th
19 Tuberville-tommy.png
Tommy Tuberville
Republican January 3, 2021 –
Present
Elected in 2020.35 117th
118th 35To be determined in the 2022 election.
119th
To be determined in the 2026 election.36 120th
#SenatorPartyYears in officeElectoral historyT TElectoral historyYears in officePartySenator#
Class 2 Class 3

Living former senators

As of January 2021, there are four living former U.S. senators from Alabama. The most recent senator to die was Maryon Pittman Allen (served June–November 1978) on July 23, 2018. The most recently serving senator to die was Howell Heflin (served 1979–1997) on March 29, 2005.

SenatorTerm of officeDate of birth (and age)
Donald Stewart November 7, 1978 – January 2, 1981February 4, 1940 (age 80)
Jeff Sessions January 3, 1997 – February 8, 2017December 24, 1946 (age 74)
Luther Strange February 9, 2017 – January 3, 2018March 1, 1953 (age 67)
Doug Jones January 3, 2018 – January 3, 2021May 4, 1954 (age 66)

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 Clay and Fitzpatrick along with several other senators announced they were withdrawing from the Senate on January 21, 1861, due to their states' decisions to secede from the Union. Clay's seat was declared vacant by the Senate on March 14, 1861, but Fitzpatrick's was vacant because his term ended on March 4, 1861.

Related Research Articles

1908 and 1909 United States Senate elections

The United States Senate elections of 1908 and 1909 were held to determine the winners of the 31 class 3 Senate seats up for election, as well as various special elections to fill vacancies or confirm appointments. Until the 17th Amendment, which passed in 1913, Senators were elected by state legislatures. However, some states had already begun direct elections during this time. Oregon pioneered direct election and experimented with different measures over several years until it succeeded in 1907. Soon after, Nebraska followed suit and laid the foundation for other states to adopt measures reflecting the people's will. By 1912, as many as 29 states elected senators either as nominees of their party's primary or in conjunction with a general election. The Republicans lost two seats overall.

1866 and 1867 United States Senate elections

The United States Senate elections of 1866 and 1867 were elections that saw the Republican Party gain two seats in the United States Senate as several of the Southern States were readmitted during Reconstruction, enlarging their majority.

References

  1. Journal of the Senate of the State of Alabama. p. 82–83.
  2. Schlup, Leonard C.; Ryan, James Gilbert (February 16, 2018). Historical Dictionary of the Gilded Age. M.E. Sharpe. ISBN   9780765621061 via Google Books.
  3. "Senator Pettus Re-elected". The New York Times . January 27, 1903. p. 3.
  4. 1 2 "NO CHOICE IN RHODE ISLAND". The New York Times . January 23, 1907. p. 1.
  5. 1 2 The Tribune Almanac and Political Register 1908. New York: The Tribune Association. 1908. p. 258.
  6. Byrd, p. 340.