United States congressional delegations from Connecticut

Last updated

Connecticut became a U.S. state in 1788, which allowed it to send congressional delegations to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives beginning with the 1st United States Congress in 1789. Each state elects two senators to serve for six years, and members of the House to two-year terms.

Contents

These are tables of congressional delegations from Connecticut to the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives.

Current delegation

Current U.S. senators from Connecticut
Connecticut

CPVI (2022): [1]
D+7
Class I senator Class III senator
Chris Murphy, official portrait, 113th Congress (cropped).jpg
Chris Murphy
(Junior senator)
Richard Blumenthal Official Portrait (cropped).jpg
Richard Blumenthal
(Senior senator)
PartyDemocraticDemocratic
Incumbent sinceJanuary 3, 2013January 3, 2011

Connecticut's current congressional delegation in the 117th Congress consists of its two senators and its five representatives, all of whom are Democrats.

The current dean of the Connecticut delegation is Representative Rosa DeLauro of the 3rd district , having served in the House since 1991.

Current U.S. representatives from Connecticut
DistrictMember
(Residence) [2]
PartyIncumbent since CPVI
(2022) [3]
District map
1st John Larson Democratic Caucus Portrait.jpg
John B. Larson
(East Hartford)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 1999D+12 Connecticut US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
2nd Joe Courtney official photo (cropped).jpg
Joe Courtney
(Vernon)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2007D+3 Connecticut US Congressional District 2 (since 2013).tif
3rd Rosa DeLauro (cropped).jpg
Rosa DeLauro
(New Haven)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 1991D+7 Connecticut US Congressional District 3 (since 2013).tif
4th Jim Himes Official Portrait, 113th Congress.jpg
Jim Himes
(Cos Cob)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2009D+13 Connecticut US Congressional District 4 (since 2013).tif
5th Jahana Hayes, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Jahana Hayes
(Wolcott)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2019D+3 Connecticut US Congressional District 5 (since 2013).tif

United States Senate

Class II senator Congress Class III senator
Oliver Ellsworth (PA) 1st (1789–1791) William Samuel
Johnson
(PA)
2nd (1791–1793)
Roger Sherman (PA)
3rd (1793–1795)
Stephen Mix Mitchell (PA)
Oliver Ellsworth (F) 4th (1795–1797) Jonathan Trumbull Jr. (F)
James Hillhouse (F) Uriah Tracy (F)
5th (1797–1799)
6th (1799–1801)
7th (1801–1803)
8th (1803–1805)
9th (1805–1807)
10th (1807–1809)
Chauncey Goodrich (F)
11th (1809–1811)
Samuel W. Dana (F)
12th (1811–1813)
13th (1813–1815)
David Daggett (F)
14th (1815–1817)
15th (1817–1819)
16th (1819–1821) James Lanman (DR)
Elijah Boardman (DR) 17th (1821–1823)
18th (1823–1825)
Henry W. Edwards (DR)
Henry W. Edwards (J) 19th (1825–1827) Calvin Willey (NR)
Samuel A. Foot (NR) 20th (1827–1829)
21st (1829–1831)
22nd (1831–1833) Gideon Tomlinson (NR)
Nathan Smith (NR) 23rd (1833–1835)
24th (1835–1837)
John Milton Niles (J)
John Milton Niles (D) 25th (1837–1839) Perry Smith (D)
Thaddeus Betts (W) 26th (1839–1841)
Jabez W. Huntington (W)
27th (1841–1843)
28th (1843–1845) John Milton Niles (D)
29th (1845–1847)
30th (1847–1849)
Roger Sherman Baldwin (W)
31st (1849–1851) Truman Smith (W)
Isaac Toucey (D) 32nd (1851–1853)
33rd (1853–1855)
Francis Gillette (FS)
34th (1855–1857) Lafayette S. Foster (O)
James Dixon (R) 35th (1857–1859)
36th (1859–1861)
37th (1861–1863) Lafayette S. Foster (R)
38th (1863–1865)
39th (1865–1867)
40th (1867–1869) Orris S. Ferry (R)
William Alfred
Buckingham
(R)
41st (1869–1871)
42nd (1871–1873)
43rd (1873–1875) Orris S. Ferry (LR)
William W. Eaton (D)
44th (1875–1877) Orris S. Ferry (R)
James E. English (D)
William Henry Barnum (D)
45th (1877–1879)
46th (1879–1881) Orville H. Platt (R)
Joseph Roswell Hawley (R) 47th (1881–1883)
48th (1883–1885)
49th (1885–1887)
50th (1887–1889)
51st (1889–1891)
52nd (1891–1893)
53rd (1893–1895)
54th (1895–1897)
55th (1897–1899)
56th (1899–1901)
57th (1901–1903)
58th (1903–1905)
Morgan Bulkeley (R) 59th (1905–1907) Frank B. Brandegee (R)
60th (1907–1909)
61st (1909–1911)
George P. McLean (R) 62nd (1911–1913)
63rd (1913–1915)
64th (1915–1917)
65th (1917–1919)
66th (1919–1921)
67th (1921–1923)
68th (1923–1925)
Hiram Bingham III (R)
69th (1925–1927)
70th (1927–1929)
Frederic C. Walcott (R) 71st (1929–1931)
72nd (1931–1933)
73rd (1933–1935) Augustine Lonergan (D)
Francis T. Maloney (D) 74th (1935–1937)
75th (1937–1939)
76th (1939–1941) John A. Danaher (R)
77th (1941–1943)
78th (1943–1945)
79th (1945–1947) Brien McMahon (D)
Thomas C. Hart (R)
Raymond E. Baldwin (R)
80th (1947–1949)
81st (1949–1951)
William Benton (D)
82nd (1951–1953)
William A. Purtell (R)
Prescott Bush (R)
William A. Purtell (R) 83rd (1953–1955)
84th (1955–1957)
85th (1957–1959)
Thomas J. Dodd (D) 86th (1959–1961)
87th (1961–1963)
88th (1963–1965) Abraham Ribicoff (D)
89th (1965–1967)
90th (1967–1969)
91st (1969–1971)
Lowell Weicker (R) 92nd (1971–1973)
93rd (1973–1975)
94th (1975–1977)
95th (1977–1979)
96th (1979–1981)
97th (1981–1983) Chris Dodd (D)
98th (1983–1985)
99th (1985–1987)
100th (1987–1989)
Joe Lieberman (D) 101st (1989–1991)
102nd (1991–1993)
103rd (1993–1995)
104th (1995–1997)
105th (1997–1999)
106th (1999–2001)
107th (2001–2003)
108th (2003–2005)
109th (2005–2007)
Joe Lieberman (CfL) 110th (2007–2009)
111th (2009–2011)
112th (2011–2013) Richard Blumenthal (D)
Chris Murphy (D) 113th (2013–2015)
114th (2015–2017)
115th (2017–2019)
116th (2019–2021)
117th (2021–2023)
117th (2023–2025)

United States House of Representatives

1789–1793: 5 seats

Connecticut was granted five seats in the House until the first US census in 1790.

CongressElected statewide on a general ticket from Connecticut's at-large district
1st seat2nd seat3rd seat4th seat5th seat
1st (1789–1791) Benjamin Huntington (PA) Roger Sherman (PA) Jonathan
Sturges
(PA)
Jonathan
Trumbull Jr.
(PA)
Jeremiah
Wadsworth
(PA)
2nd (1791–1793) James Hillhouse (PA) Amasa Learned (PA)

1793–1823: 7 seats

Following 1790 census, Connecticut was apportioned seven seats.

CongressElected statewide on a general ticket from Connecticut's at-large district
1st seat2nd seat3rd seat4th seat5th seat6th seat7th seat
3rd (1793–1795) James Hillhouse (PA) Amasa Learned (PA) Joshua Coit (PA) Jonathan
Trumbull Jr.
(PA)
Jeremiah
Wadsworth
(PA)
Zephaniah Swift (PA) Uriah Tracy (PA)
4th (1795–1797) James Hillhouse (F) Chauncey
Goodrich
(F)
Joshua Coit (F) Roger Griswold (F) Nathaniel Smith (F) Zephaniah Swift (F) Uriah Tracy (F)
James Davenport (F) Samuel W. Dana (F)
5th (1797–1799) John Allen (F)
William Edmond (F) Jonathan Brace (F)
6th (1799–1801) Elizur Goodrich (F) John Davenport (F)
John Cotton
Smith
(F)
7th (1801–1803) Benjamin Tallmadge (F) Calvin Goddard (F) Elias Perkins (F)
8th (1803–1805) Simeon Baldwin (F)
9th (1805–1807) Jonathan O. Moseley (F)
Theodore Dwight (F) Timothy Pitkin (F) Lewis B. Sturges (F)
10th (1807–1809) Epaphroditus
Champion
(F)
11th (1809–1811)
Ebenezer Huntington (F)
12th (1811–1813) Lyman Law (F)
13th (1813–1815)
14th (1815–1817)
15th (1817–1819) Thomas Scott
Williams
(F)
Uriel Holmes (F) Samuel B.
Sherwood
(F)
Nathaniel Terry (F) Ebenezer Huntington (F)
Sylvester Gilbert (DR)
16th (1819–1821) Gideon Tomlinson (DR) James Stevens (DR) Samuel A. Foot (DR) John Russ (DR) Jonathan O. Moseley (DR) Elisha Phelps (DR) Henry W. Edwards (DR)
17th (1821–1823) Daniel Burrows (DR) Ansel Sterling (DR) Noyes Barber (DR) Ebenezer Stoddard (DR)

1823–1843: 6 seats

Following 1820 census, Connecticut was apportioned six seats.

CongressElected statewide on a general ticket from Connecticut's at-large district
1st seat2nd seat3rd seat4th seat5th seat6th seat
18th (1823–1825) Gideon Tomlinson (DR) [lower-alpha 1] Lemuel Whitman (DR) [lower-alpha 1] Ansel Sterling (DR) [lower-alpha 1] Samuel A. Foot (DR) [lower-alpha 1] Noyes Barber (DR) [lower-alpha 1] Ebenezer Stoddard (DR) [lower-alpha 1]
19th (1825–1827) Gideon Tomlinson (NR) John Baldwin (NR) Ralph Isaacs Ingersoll (NR) Orange Merwin (NR) Noyes Barber (NR) Elisha Phelps (NR)
20th (1827–1829) David Plant (NR)
21st (1829–1831) William W. Ellsworth (NR) Jabez W. Huntington (NR) Ebenezer Young (NR) William L. Storrs (NR)
22nd (1831–1833)
23rd (1833–1835) Samuel A. Foot (NR) Samuel Tweedy (NR)
Joseph Trumbull (NR) Phineas Miner (NR) Ebenezer Jackson Jr. (NR)
24th (1835–1837) Isaac Toucey (J) Samuel Ingham (J) Elisha Haley (J) Zalmon Wildman (J) Lancelot Phelps (J) Andrew T. Judson (J)
Thomas T. Whittlesey (J) Orrin Holt (J)
CongressDistrict
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
25th (1837–1839) Isaac Toucey (D) Samuel Ingham (D) Elisha Haley (D) Thomas T. Whittlesey (D) Lancelot Phelps (D) Orrin Holt (D)
26th (1839–1841) Joseph Trumbull (W) William L. Storrs (W) Thomas W. Williams (W) Thomas Burr Osborne (W) Truman Smith (W) John H. Brockway (W)
William Whiting
Boardman
(W)
27th (1841–1843)

1843–1903: 4 seats

Following 1840 census, Connecticut was apportioned four seats.

CongressDistrict
1st 2nd 3rd 4th
28th (1843–1845) Thomas H. Seymour (D) John Stewart (D) George S. Catlin (D) Samuel Simons (D)
29th (1845–1847) James Dixon (W) Samuel Dickson
Hubbard
(W)
John A. Rockwell (W) Truman Smith (W)
30th (1847–1849)
31st (1849–1851) Loren P. Waldo (D) Walter Booth (FS) Chauncey Fitch
Cleveland
(D)
Thomas B. Butler (W)
32nd (1851–1853) Charles Chapman (W) Colin M. Ingersoll (D) Origen S. Seymour (D)
33rd (1853–1855) James T. Pratt (D) Nathan Belcher (D)
34th (1855–1857) Ezra Clark Jr. (KN) John Woodruff (KN) Sidney Dean (KN) William W. Welch (KN)
35th (1857–1859) Ezra Clark Jr. (R) Samuel Arnold (D) Sidney Dean (R) William D. Bishop (D)
36th (1859–1861) Dwight Loomis (R) John Woodruff (R) Alfred A. Burnham (R) Orris S. Ferry (R)
37th (1861–1863) James E. English (D) George Catlin Woodruff (D)
38th (1863–1865) Henry C. Deming (R) Augustus Brandegee (R) John Henry Hubbard (R)
39th (1865–1867) Samuel L. Warner (R)
40th (1867–1869) Richard D. Hubbard (R) Julius Hotchkiss (D) Henry H.
Starkweather
(R)
William Henry Barnum (D)
41st (1869–1871) Julius L. Strong (R) Stephen Wright
Kellogg
(R)
42nd (1871–1873)
Joseph Roswell Hawley (R)
43rd (1873–1875)
44th (1875–1877) George M. Landers (D) James Phelps (D)
John T. Wait (R) Levi Warner (D)
45th (1877–1879)
46th (1879–1881) Joseph Roswell Hawley (R) Frederick Miles (R)
47th (1881–1883) John R. Buck (R)
48th (1883–1885) William W. Eaton (D) Charles Le Moyne
Mitchell
(D)
Edward Woodruff
Seymour
(D)
49th (1885–1887) John R. Buck (R)
50th (1887–1889) Robert J. Vance (D) Carlos French (D) Charles Addison
Russell
(R)
Miles T. Granger (D)
51st (1889–1891) William E. Simonds (R) Washington F. Willcox (D) Frederick Miles (R)
52nd (1891–1893) Lewis Sperry (D) Robert E. De Forest (D)
53rd (1893–1895) James P. Pigott (D)
54th (1895–1897) E. Stevens Henry (R) Nehemiah D. Sperry (R) Ebenezer J. Hill (R)
55th (1897–1899)
56th (1899–1901)
57th (1901–1903)
Frank B. Brandegee (R)
Congress 1st 2nd 3rd 4th
District

1903–1933: 5 seats

Following 1900 census, Connecticut was apportioned five seats.

CongressDistrict
1st 2nd 3rd 4th At-large
58th (1903–1905) E. Stevens Henry (R) Nehemiah D.
Sperry
(R)
Frank B.
Brandegee
(R)
Ebenezer J. Hill (R) George L. Lilley (R)
59th (1905–1907)
Edwin W. Higgins (R)
60th (1907–1909)
61st (1909–1911) John Q. Tilson (R)
62nd (1911–1913) Thomas L. Reilly (D)
63rd (1913–1915) Augustine Lonergan (D) Bryan F. Mahan (D) Thomas L. Reilly (D) Jeremiah
Donovan
(D)
5th district
William Kennedy (D)
64th (1915–1917) Peter Davis Oakley (R) Richard P.
Freeman
(R)
John Q. Tilson (R) Ebenezer J. Hill (R) James P. Glynn (R)
65th (1917–1919) Augustine Lonergan (D)
Schuyler Merritt (R)
66th (1919–1921)
67th (1921–1923) E. Hart Fenn (R)
68th (1923–1925) Patrick B. O'Sullivan (D)
69th (1925–1927) James P. Glynn (R)
70th (1927–1929)
71st (1929–1931)
Edward W. Goss (R)
72nd (1931–1933) Augustine Lonergan (D) William L. Tierney (D)

1933–2003: 6 seats

Following 1930 census, Connecticut was apportioned six seats.

CongressDistrict
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th At-large
73rd (1933–1935) Herman Kopplemann (D) William L. Higgins (R) Francis T.
Maloney
(D)
Schuyler Merritt (R) Edward W.
Goss
(R)
Charles Montague
Bakewell
(R)
74th (1935–1937) James A.
Shanley
(D)
J. Joseph
Smith
(D)
William M. Citron (D)
75th (1937–1939) William J. Fitzgerald (D) Alfred N. Phillips (D)
76th (1939–1941) William J. Miller (R) Thomas R. Ball (R) Albert E. Austin (R) B. J. Monkiewicz (R)
77th (1941–1943) Herman Kopplemann (D) William J. Fitzgerald (D) Le Roy D. Downs (D) Lucien J. Maciora (D)
Joseph E.
Talbot
(R)
78th (1943–1945) William J. Miller (R) John D. McWilliams (R) Ranulf Compton (R) Clare Boothe
Luce
(R)
B. J. Monkiewicz (R)
79th (1945–1947) Herman Kopplemann (D) Chase Woodhouse (D) James P. Geelan (D) Joseph F. Ryter (D)
80th (1947–1949) William J. Miller (R) Horace Seely-Brown (R) Ellsworth Foote (R) John Davis
Lodge
(R)
James T.
Patterson
(R)
Antoni Sadlak (R)
81st (1949–1951) Abraham Ribicoff (D) Chase Woodhouse (D) John A. McGuire (D)
82nd (1951–1953) Horace Seely-Brown (R) Albert P.
Morano
(R)
83rd (1953–1955) Thomas J. Dodd (D) Albert W.
Cretella
(R)
84th (1955–1957)
85th (1957–1959) Edwin H. May Jr. (R)
86th (1959–1961) Emilio Q. Daddario (D) Chester Bowles (D) Robert Giaimo (D) Donald J. Irwin (D) John S.
Monagan
(D)
Frank Kowalski (D)
87th (1961–1963) Horace Seely-Brown (R) Abner W. Sibal (R)
88th (1963–1965) William St. Onge (D) Bernard Grabowski (D)
89th (1965–1967) Donald J. Irwin (D) 6th district
Bernard Grabowski (D)
90th (1967–1969) Thomas Meskill (R)
91st (1969–1971) Lowell Weicker (R)
Robert H. Steele (R)
92nd (1971–1973) William R. Cotter (D) Stewart
McKinney
(R)
Ella Grasso (D)
93rd (1973–1975) Ronald A.
Sarasin
(R)
94th (1975–1977) Chris Dodd (D) Toby Moffett (D)
95th (1977–1979)
96th (1979–1981) William R.
Ratchford
(D)
97th (1981–1983) Sam Gejdenson (D) Larry DeNardis (R)
Barbara B. Kennelly (D)
98th (1983–1985) Bruce Morrison (D) Nancy Johnson (R)
99th (1985–1987) John G.
Rowland
(R)
100th (1987–1989)
Chris Shays (R)
101st (1989–1991)
102nd (1991–1993) Rosa DeLauro (D) Gary Franks (R)
103rd (1993–1995)
104th (1995–1997)
105th (1997–1999) James H.
Maloney
(D)
106th (1999–2001) John B. Larson (D)
107th (2001–2003) Rob Simmons (R)
Congress 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
District

2003–present: 5 seats

Following 2000 census, Connecticut was apportioned five seats.

CongressDistrict
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
108th (2003–2005) John B. Larson (D) Rob Simmons (R) Rosa DeLauro (D) Chris Shays (R) Nancy Johnson (R)
109th (2005–2007)
110th (2007–2009) Joe Courtney (D) Chris Murphy (D)
111th (2009–2011) Jim Himes (D)
112th (2011–2013)
113th (2013–2015) Elizabeth Esty (D)
114th (2015–2017)
115th (2017–2019)
116th (2019–2021) Jahana Hayes (D)
117th (2021–2023)
118th (2023–2025)

Key

Democratic (D)
Democratic-Republican (DR)
Federalist (F)
Pro-Administration (PA)
Free Soil (FS)
Independent Democrat (ID)
Know Nothing (KN)
National Republican (NR)
Republican (R)

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Supported the Adams-Clay ticket in the 1824 United States presidential election.
  1. "2022 Cook PVI℠: State Map and List". Cook Political Report. Retrieved 2023-01-05.
  2. "Office of the Clerk, U.S. House of Representatives". clerk.house.gov. Retrieved 2022-01-06.
  3. "2022 Cook PVI℠: District Map and List". Cook Political Report. Retrieved 2023-01-05.