Eastford, Connecticut

Last updated
Eastford, Connecticut
EastfordCT PhoenixvilleMeetingHouse.jpg
EastfordCTseal.gif
Seal
Windham County Connecticut incorporated and unincorporated areas Eastford highlighted.svg
Location in Windham County and the state of Connecticut.
Coordinates: 41°53′37″N72°05′49″W / 41.89361°N 72.09694°W / 41.89361; -72.09694 Coordinates: 41°53′37″N72°05′49″W / 41.89361°N 72.09694°W / 41.89361; -72.09694
Country United States
State Connecticut
NECTA Hartford
RegionNortheastern Connecticut
County Windham
Incorporated1847
Government
  Type Selectman-town meeting
  First selectmanJacqueline Dubois (R)
   State Senator Dan Champaigne
(R-35th District)
   State Rep. Pat Boyd
(D-50th District)
Area
  Total29.2 sq mi (75.6 km2)
  Land28.9 sq mi (74.8 km2)
  Water0.3 sq mi (0.9 km2)
Elevation
653 ft (199 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total1,749
  Density61/sq mi (24/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (Eastern)
ZIP code
06242
Area code(s) 860
FIPS code 09-21860
GNIS feature ID213420
Major highways US 44.svg
Website www.eastfordct.org/townofeastford

Eastford is a town in Windham County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 1,749 at the 2010 census.

Contents

History

Eastford was formed in 1847 when it was broken off from Ashford, Connecticut. The name "Eastford" is locational, for the town is east of Ashford. [1]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 29.2 square miles (76 km2), of which, 28.9 square miles (75 km2) of it is land and 0.3 square miles (0.78 km2) of it (1.20%) is water.

Principal Communities

On the National Register of Historic Places

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1850 1,127
1860 1,005−10.8%
1870 984−2.1%
1880 855−13.1%
1890 561−34.4%
1900 523−6.8%
1910 513−1.9%
1920 496−3.3%
1930 5296.7%
1940 496−6.2%
1950 59820.6%
1960 74624.7%
1970 92223.6%
1980 1,02811.5%
1990 1,31427.8%
2000 1,61823.1%
2010 1,7498.1%
2014 (est.)1,734 [3] −0.9%
U.S. Decennial Census [4]

At the 2000 census there were 1,618 people, 618 households, and 451 families living in the town. The population density was 56.0 people per square mile (21.6/km2). There were 705 housing units at an average density of 24.4 per square mile (9.4/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 97.78% White, 0.43% African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.31% from other races, and 0.93% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.36%. [5]

There were 618 households, out of which 100 have children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.1% were married couples living together, 6.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.0% were non-families. 21.8% of households were one person, and 9.1% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.06.

The age distribution was 26.3% under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to 24, 29.2% from 25 to 44, 25.4% from 45 to 64, and 13.4% 65 or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 103.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.0 males.

The median household income was $57,159 and the median family income was $62,031. Males had a median income of $45,000 versus $31,964 for females. The per capita income for the town was $25,364. About 4.4% of families and 6.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.0% of those under age 18 and 3.7% of those age 65 or over.

Easton is a strongly Republican town. The town has voted for the Republican candidate every time since the 1956 election. Even during President Lyndon B. Johnson's landslide in 1964, Easton voters still preferred Barry Goldwater, the Republican candidate, by a comfortable 11.2% margin. Since 1992, however, the Democratic candidate has been more competitive. President Barack Obama only lost to Mitt Romney by 1 vote in 2012. [6]

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of October 27, 2009 [7]
PartyActive VotersInactive VotersTotal VotersPercentage
Republican 3912541634.84%
Democratic 290929925.04%
Unaffiliated4373847539.78%
Minor Parties0000.0%
Total1,121731,194100%
Presidential Election Results [6] [8]
Year Democratic Republican Third Parties
2020 43.5% 46453.6%5722.9% 31
2016 38.6% 36754.0%5137.4% 69
2012 49.0% 46449.1%4651.9% 18
2008 48.9% 48549.2%4881.9% 18
2004 44.0% 41654.3%5131.7% 16
2000 44.3% 37549.7%4216.0% 50
1996 38.1% 30141.7%32920.2% 159
1992 32.7% 28539.5%34427.8% 242
1988 34.9% 25363.8%4631.3% 9
1984 26.2% 17273.1%4790.7% 4
1980 29.1% 18355.7%35015.2% 95
1976 36.0% 20463.4%3590.6% 3
1972 29.6% 15269.9%3590.5% 2
1968 24.4% 10372.4%3053.2% 13
1964 44.4% 18855.6%2360.00% 0
1960 21.0% 8279.0%3090.00% 0
1956 15.6% 6284.4%3350.00% 0

Education

Residents are zoned to the Eastford School District for grades Preschool through 8. The only school in the district is Eastford Elementary School. Most high schoolers attend Woodstock Academy. The town is near three alternative high schools: Ellis Vocational Technical School, Windham Technical School and Quinebaug Middle College.

Notable people

Trivia

There was another Eastford in the state which was renamed East Windsor shortly after its separation from Windsor.

Eastford is the site of Frog Rock, a rest stop and roadside attraction on U.S. Route 44. [9]

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References

  1. The Connecticut Magazine: An Illustrated Monthly. Connecticut Magazine Company. 1903. p. 332.
  2. Federal Writer's Project for the State of Connecticut. Connecticut; a Guide to Its Roads, Lore, and People. p. 434. Retrieved May 29, 2013.
  3. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Archived from the original on May 23, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  4. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  5. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. 1 2 "General Election Statements of Vote, 1922 – Current". CT Secretary of State. Retrieved May 2, 2021.
  7. "Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of October 27, 2009" (PDF). Connecticut Secretary of State. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 17, 2010. Retrieved 2010-08-14.
  8. "Election Night Reporting". CT Secretary of State. Retrieved May 2, 2021.
  9. Haar, Dan (2014-08-18). "The Best Of Americana At Frog Rock Rest Stop". The Hartford Courant. Retrieved 2020-08-09.