Goshen, Connecticut

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Goshen, Connecticut
GoshenCTseal.JPG
Litchfield County Connecticut Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Goshen Highlighted 2010.svg
Location in Litchfield County, Connecticut
Coordinates: 41°51′05″N73°14′09″W / 41.85139°N 73.23583°W / 41.85139; -73.23583 Coordinates: 41°51′05″N73°14′09″W / 41.85139°N 73.23583°W / 41.85139; -73.23583
Country Flag of the United States.svg  United States
U.S. state Flag of Connecticut.svg  Connecticut
County Litchfield
Region Northwest Hills
Incorporated1739
Government
  Type Selectman-town meeting
  First selectmanTodd Q. Carusillo (R)
  SelectmanMark S. Harris (R)
  SelectmanDexter Kinsella (D)
Area
  Total45.2 sq mi (117.0 km2)
  Land43.6 sq mi (113.0 km2)
  Water1.5 sq mi (4.0 km2)
Elevation
1,319 ft (402 m)
Population
 (2020)
  Total3,150
  Density70/sq mi (27/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (Eastern)
ZIP code
06756
Area code(s) 860
FIPS code 09-32290
GNIS feature ID0213433
Website www.goshenct.gov

Goshen is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 3,150 at the 2020 census. [1]

Contents

Geography

Goshen is in central Litchfield County and is bordered to the east by the city of Torrington. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town of Goshen has a total area of 45.2 square miles (117.0 km2), of which 43.6 square miles (113.0 km2) are land and 1.5 square miles (4.0 km2), or 3.44%, are water. [2] A large portion of the Mohawk State Forest is located in the town. The Appalachian Trail formerly passed through the town until it was re-routed west of the Housatonic River.

Principal communities

Other minor communities and geographic areas in the town are Hall Meadow, North Goshen, Tyler Lake, West Side, and Woodridge Lake. Woodridge Lake is private. It is only available to residents (it is not a gated community). They have access to the clubhouse, and all of the lake's beaches.

History

The town was incorporated in 1739, one year after settlement of the town center began. The community was named after the Land of Goshen, in Egypt. [3] The Congregational church was founded the following year. [4] During the 18th century, Goshen was a farming, and later, prosperous business community. Gunmakers from the town such as the Medad Hills manufactured guns during the French and Indian War and Revolutionary War. Other notable business include the Pine Apple Cheese Factory and the Brooks pottery shop.

The first school in Goshen was built in 1753. A seminary for young women was established in 1819. The Goshen Academy was established several years later and became a well-regarded preparatory school during the 19th century.

Settlers from Goshen were the first to settle Hudson Township, Summit County, Ohio, in the Connecticut Western Reserve.

Notable locations

Historic sites in the town include:

Transportation

Connecticut Route 4 is the principal east–west through route in the town, while Connecticut Route 63 serves as the main north–south road. Route 4 leads east into Torrington and west into Cornwall, while Route 63 leads northwest to South Canaan and southeast to Litchfield.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1820 1,585
1850 1,457
1860 1,381−5.2%
1870 1,223−11.4%
1880 1,093−10.6%
1890 972−11.1%
1900 835−14.1%
1910 675−19.2%
1920 6750.0%
1930 6831.2%
1940 77813.9%
1950 94020.8%
1960 1,28837.0%
1970 1,3514.9%
1980 1,70626.3%
1990 2,32936.5%
2000 2,69715.8%
2010 2,97610.3%
2020 3,1505.8%
U.S. Decennial Census [5]

As of the census [6] of 2000, there were 2,697 people, 1,066 households, and 814 families residing in the town. The population density was 61.8 inhabitants per square mile (23.9/km2). There were 1,482 housing units at an average density of 33.9 per square mile (13.1/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 98.26% White, 0.48% African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.74% Asian, and 0.37% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.22% of the population.

There were 1,066 households, out of which 29.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.5% were married couples living together, 5.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.6% were non-families. 20.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 2.91.

In the town, the population was spread out, with 22.7% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 25.1% from 25 to 44, 31.7% from 45 to 64, and 15.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.5 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $64,432, and the median income for a family was $72,452. Males had a median income of $48,125 versus $30,464 for females. The per capita income for the town was $33,925. About 2.9% of families and 3.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.1% of those under age 18 and 3.9% of those age 65 or over.

Voter registration and party enrollment as of October 25, 2005 [7]
PartyActive votersInactive votersTotal votersPercentage
Republican 7451676137.29%
Democratic 413641920.53%
Unaffiliated 8273386042.14%
Minor Parties 1010.05%
Total1,986552,041100%
Presidential Election Results [8]
Year Democratic Republican Third Parties
2020 43.0% 90255.3%1,1611.7% 37
2016 36.9% 67358.4%1,0644.7% 86
2012 42.0% 75156.9%1,0171.1% 19
2008 47.4% 85651.3%9271.3% 24
2004 42.2% 71556.3%9541.5% 27
2000 39.7% 58553.5%7886.8% 100
1996 39.6% 51845.6%59714.8% 194
1992 31.0% 44741.0%59128.0% 404
1988 33.9% 40364.7%7691.4% 16
1984 29.3% 31870.1%7610.6% 7
1980 29.8% 28656.0%53814.2% 137
1976 34.4% 27964.7%5250.9% 8
1972 30.5% 22567.9%5012.6% 12
1968 34.4% 24061.3%4284.3% 30
1964 51.6%32948.4% 3090.00% 0
1960 31.5% 21468.5%4650.00% 0
1956 20.2% 12379.8%4850.00% 0

Arts and culture

Multiple events are hosted at the Goshen Fairgrounds each year, located on Route 63 south just outside the center of town. One such event is the Goshen Stampede, a festival held annually on Father's Day weekend that hosts a rodeo, demolition derby, music festival, and truck pull. Later in the summer on Labor Day weekend is the annual Goshen Fair. As the county's largest agricultural fair, it features farm animal judgement shows, competition and contest in log chopping, log sawing, hay-bale throwing and the like. There are food, art, photography, baked goods, and craft contests, as well as rides for children, carnival games, and craft and food vendors. Attendance over the three days can range up to 50,000 people.

Traditionally at the beginning of August, and usually the first Saturday, the Church of Christ presents an Annual Blueberry Festival where they sell blueberry pies, blueberries and host a blueberry breakfast. It is very well known and people from all around the area come to enjoy the festival and the pies. The blueberry pies are available for sale all year long, as well as other flavors made by hand by the congregation (apple, peach, and blueberry-peach). Mini pies are also sold by the church at the Goshen Fair.

The town is also home to the Goshen Players.

Notable people

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References

  1. "Census - Geography Profile: Goshen town, Litchfield County, Connecticut". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  2. "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001), Goshen town, Litchfield County, Connecticut". American FactFinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved October 7, 2019.
  3. The Connecticut Magazine: An Illustrated Monthly. Connecticut Magazine Company. 1903. p. 332.
  4. "History of the Town of Goshen, Connecticut," Page 72, 1897
  5. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  6. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  7. "Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of October 25, 2005" (PDF). Connecticut Secretary of State. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 23, 2006. Retrieved 2006-10-02.
  8. "General Election Statements of Vote, 1922 – Current". CT Secretary of State. Retrieved December 16, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)