Goshen, Connecticut

Last updated
Goshen, Connecticut
GoshenCTseal.JPG
Seal
Goshen CT lg.PNG
Location in Litchfield County, Connecticut
Coordinates: 41°51′05″N73°14′09″W / 41.85139°N 73.23583°W / 41.85139; -73.23583 Coordinates: 41°51′05″N73°14′09″W / 41.85139°N 73.23583°W / 41.85139; -73.23583
Country Flag of the United States.svg  United States
U.S. state Flag of Connecticut.svg  Connecticut
County Litchfield
Region Northwest Hills
Incorporated1739
Government
  Type Selectman-town meeting
  First selectmanRobert P. Valentine (R)
  SelectmanSteven Romano (R)
  SelectmanDexter Kinsella (D)
Area
  Total45.2 sq mi (117.0 km2)
  Land43.6 sq mi (113.0 km2)
  Water1.5 sq mi (4.0 km2)
Elevation
1,319 ft (402 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total2,976
  Density68/sq mi (26.3/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (Eastern)
ZIP code
06756
Area code(s) 860
FIPS code 09-32290
GNIS feature ID0213433
Website www.goshenct.gov

Goshen is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 2,976 at the 2010 census. [1]

New England town Basic unit of local government in each of the six New England federated states of the United States

The New England town, generally referred to in New England simply as a town, is the basic unit of local government and local division of state authority in each of the six New England states and without a direct counterpart in most other U.S. states. New England towns overlay the entire area of a state, similar to civil townships in other states where they exist, but they are fully functioning municipal corporations, possessing powers similar to cities in other states. New Jersey's system of equally powerful townships, boroughs, towns, and cities is the system which is most similar to that of New England. New England towns are often governed by a town meeting legislative body. The great majority of municipal corporations in New England are based on the town model; statutory forms based on the concept of a compact populated place are uncommon, though they are prevalent elsewhere in the U.S. County government in New England states is typically weak at best, and in some states nonexistent. Connecticut, for example, has no county governments, nor does Rhode Island. Both of those states retain counties only as geographic subdivisions with no governmental authority, while Massachusetts has abolished eight of fourteen county governments so far. With few exceptions, counties serve mostly as dividing lines for the states' judicial systems.

Litchfield County, Connecticut County of Connecticut in Connecticut

Litchfield County is located in northwestern Connecticut in the New York metropolitan area. As of the 2010 census, the population was 189,927. The county was named after Lichfield, in England. Litchfield County has the lowest population density of any county in Connecticut and is geographically the state's largest county.

Connecticut U.S. state in the United States

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the northeastern United States. As of the 2010 Census, it has the highest per-capita income, Human Development Index (0.962), and median household income in the United States. It is bordered by Rhode Island to the east, Massachusetts to the north, New York to the west, and Long Island Sound to the south. Its capital is Hartford and its most populous city is Bridgeport. It is part of New England, although portions of it are often grouped with New York and New Jersey as the tri-state area. The state is named for the Connecticut River which approximately bisects the state. The word "Connecticut" is derived from various anglicized spellings of an Algonquian word for "long tidal river".

Contents

Geography

Goshen is in central Litchfield County and is bordered to the east by the city of Torrington. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town of Goshen has a total area of 45.2 square miles (117.0 km2), of which 43.6 square miles (113.0 km2) are land and 1.5 square miles (4.0 km2), or 3.44%, are water. [1] A large portion of the Mohawk State Forest is located in the town. The Appalachian Trail formerly passed through the town until it was re-routed west of the Housatonic River.

Torrington, Connecticut City in Connecticut, United States

Torrington is the largest city in Litchfield County, Connecticut and the Northwest Hills region. It is also the core city of Greater Torrington, one of the largest micropolitan areas in the United States. The city population was 36,383 according to the 2010 census.

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Mohawk State Forest

Mohawk State Forest, also known as Mohawk State Forest/Mohawk Mountain State Park, encompasses over 4,000 acres (1,600 ha) in the towns of Cornwall, Goshen, and Litchfield in the southern Berkshires of Litchfield County, Connecticut. As overseen by the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, the area is used for hiking, picnicking, and winter sports by the public, while being actively managed to produce timber and other forest products.

Principal communities

Other minor communities and geographic areas in the town are Hall Meadow, North Goshen, Tyler Lake, West Side, and Woodridge Lake. Woodridge lake is private. It is only available to residents (it is not a gated community). They have access to the clubhouse, and all of the lake's beaches.

History

The town was incorporated in 1739, one year after settlement of the town center began. The community was named after the Land of Goshen, in Egypt. [2] The Congregational church was founded the following year. [3] During the 18th century, Goshen was a farming, and later, prosperous business community. Gunmakers from the town such as the Medad Hills manufactured guns during the French and Indian War and Revolutionary War. Other notable business include the pineapple cheese factory and the Brooks pottery shop.

The Land of Goshen is named in the Bible as the place in Egypt given to the Hebrews by the pharaoh of Joseph, and the land from which they later left Egypt at the time of the Exodus. It was located in the eastern Delta of the Nile, lower Egypt.

Congregational church religious denomination

Congregational churches are Protestant churches in the Reformed tradition practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs.

French and Indian War North American theater of the worldwide Seven Years War

The French and Indian War (1754–1763) pitted the colonies of British America against those of New France, each side supported by military units from the parent country and by American Indian allies. At the start of the war, the French colonies had a population of roughly 60,000 settlers, compared with 2 million in the British colonies. The outnumbered French particularly depended on the Indians.

The first school in Goshen was built in 1753. A seminary for young women was established in 1819. The Goshen Academy was established several years later and became a well-regarded preparatory school during the 19th century.

Settlers from Goshen were the first to settle Hudson Township, Summit County, Ohio, in the Connecticut Western Reserve.

Connecticut Western Reserve Area claimed by Connecticut until 1800.

The Connecticut Western Reserve was a portion of land claimed by the Colony of Connecticut and later by the state of Connecticut in what is now mostly the northeastern region of Ohio. The Reserve had been granted to the Colony under the terms of its charter by King Charles II.

Notable locations

Historic sites in the town include:

Hervey Brooks Pottery Shop and Kiln Site United States historic place

The Hervey Brooks Pottery Shop and Kiln Site is a historic industrial archaeological site in Goshen, Connecticut. It is the site of the 19th-century pottery of Hervey Brooks, a local potter significant for his extensive recordkeeping. Brooks' pottery included a shop and a stone kiln. The shop structure was moved to Old Sturbridge Village in the 20th century, where a reconstruction of his kiln has also been undertaken. The original site is of archaeological significance for identifying the materials Brooks used and how he laid out his work site, and for identifying how those changed over time.

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

Goshen Historic District (Goshen, Connecticut) United States historic place

Goshen Historic District is a historic district encompassing the town center village of Goshen, Connecticut. Centered at the junction of Connecticut Routes 4 and 63, the village developed historically as a rural crossroads of two turnpikes, and has retained its rural character. It is dominated by residential architecture from the first half of the 19th century, and includes churches, a store, and the town's former 1895 town hall. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Transportation

Connecticut Route 4 is the principal east–west through route in the town, while Connecticut Route 63 serves as the main north–south road. Route 4 leads east into Torrington and west into Cornwall, while Route 63 leads northwest to South Canaan and southeast to Litchfield.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1820 1,585
1850 1,457
1860 1,381−5.2%
1870 1,223−11.4%
1880 1,093−10.6%
1890 972−11.1%
1900 835−14.1%
1910 675−19.2%
1920 6750.0%
1930 6831.2%
1940 77813.9%
1950 94020.8%
1960 1,28837.0%
1970 1,3514.9%
1980 1,70626.3%
1990 2,32936.5%
2000 2,69715.8%
2010 2,97610.3%
Est. 20142,914 [4] −2.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [5]

As of the census [6] of 2000, there were 2,697 people, 1,066 households, and 814 families residing in the town. The population density was 61.8 people per square mile (23.9/km²). There were 1,482 housing units at an average density of 33.9 per square mile (13.1/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.26% White, 0.48% African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.74% Asian, and 0.37% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.22% of the population.

There were 1,066 households out of which 29.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.5% were married couples living together, 5.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.6% were non-families. 20.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 2.91.

In the town, the population was spread out with 22.7% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 25.1% from 25 to 44, 31.7% from 45 to 64, and 15.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.5 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $64,432, and the median income for a family was $72,452. Males had a median income of $48,125 versus $30,464 for females. The per capita income for the town was $33,925. About 2.9% of families and 3.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.1% of those under age 18 and 3.9% of those age 65 or over.

Voter registration and party enrollment as of October 25, 2005 [7]
PartyActive votersInactive votersTotal votersPercentage
Republican 7451676137.29%
Democratic 413641920.53%
Unaffiliated8273386042.14%
Minor Parties1010.05%
Total1,986552,041100%

Arts and culture

Annually on father day weekend the Goshen Stampede is held at the Goshen Fairgrounds. Which is festival consisting of new England's largest Rodeo, Demolition Derby, Music Fest, and Truck Pull. It is also home to the Goshen players. Each Labor Day weekend the Goshen Fair takes place at the Goshen Fair Grounds on Route 63 south just outside the center of town. Similar in nature to the Agricultural Fair having farm animal judgement shows, competition and contest in log chopping, log sawing, haybale throwing and the like. There are food, art, photography, baked goods, and craft contests. Rides for children, vendors of craft goods and food vendor are also present. Attendance over the three days can range up to 50,000 people

Traditionally at the beginning of August, and usually the first Saturday, the Church of Christ presents an Annual Blueberry Festival where they sell blueberry pies, blueberries and host a blueberry breakfast. It is very well known and people from all around the area come to enjoy the festival and the pies. The blueberry pies are available for sale all year long, as well as other flavors made by hand by the congregation (apples, peach and blueberry peach as well as the blueberry). Mini pies are also sold by the church at the annual Goshen Fair on Labor Day weekend.

Notable people

Related Research Articles

Canton, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Canton is a town, incorporated in 1806, in Hartford County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 8,840 at the 2000 census and 10,292 as of the 2010 census. It is bordered by Granby on the north, Simsbury on the east, Avon and Burlington on the south, New Hartford on the west, and Barkhamsted on the northwest. Running through it is the Farmington River. The town includes the villages of North Canton, Canton Center, Canton, and Collinsville. In September 2007, Collinsville was ranked in Budget Travel magazine as one of the "Ten Coolest Small Towns In America".

Barkhamsted, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Barkhamsted is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. It contains seven villages, West Hill, Mallory, Barkhamsted Center, Center Hill, Washington Hill, Pleasant Valley, and Riverton. The population was 3,799 at the 2010 census, up from 3,494 at the 2000 census. The town incorporated in 1779. Barkhamsted was named after Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire, England.

Bethlehem, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Bethlehem is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 3,607 at the 2010 census, up from 3,422 at the 2000 census. The town center is a historic district and a census-designated place (CDP).

Colebrook, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Colebrook is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 1,485 at the 2010 census. Colebrook was named after Colebrooke in the English county of Devon; the reason is now unknown.

Cornwall, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Cornwall is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 1,420 at the 2010 census.

Harwinton, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Harwinton is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 5,283 at the 2000 census. The high school is Lewis S. Mills.

New Hartford, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

New Hartford is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 6,970 at the 2010 census. The town center is also defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as a census-designated place (CDP). The town is mainly a rural community consisting of farms, homes, and parks. Brodie Park and Ski Sundown are located in New Hartford.

Norfolk, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Norfolk is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 1,787 at the 2010 census. The urban center of the town is the Norfolk census-designated place, with a population of 553 at the 2010 census.

Plymouth, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Plymouth is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. It is named after Plymouth, Devon, England. The population was 12,243 at the 2010 census. The town of Plymouth includes the villages of Terryville and Pequabuck.

Roxbury, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Roxbury is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 2,262 at the 2010 census.

Thomaston, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Thomaston is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 7,887 at the 2010 census. The urban center of the town is the Thomaston census-designated place, with a population of 1,910 at the 2010 census.

Warren, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Warren is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 1,461 at the 2010 census. The town was named for Revolutionary War General Joseph Warren.

Watertown, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Watertown is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 22,514 at the 2010 census. The zip code for Watertown is 06795. It is a suburb of Waterbury. It borders the towns of Woodbury, Middlebury, Morris, Plymouth, Bethlehem, and Thomaston. The urban center of the town is the Watertown census-designated place, with a population of 3,574 at the 2010 census.

Winchester, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Winchester is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 11,242 at the 2010 census. The City of Winsted is located in Winchester.

Deep River, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Deep River is a town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 4,629 at the 2010 census. The town center is also designated by the U.S. Census Bureau as a census-designated place (CDP). Deep River is part of what the locals call the "Tri-town Area" made up of Deep River, Chester, and Essex, Connecticut.

Preston, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Preston is a town in New London County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 4,726 at the 2010 census. The town includes the villages of Long Society, Preston City, and Poquetanuck.

Goshen, New Hampshire Place in New Hampshire, United States

Goshen is a town in Sullivan County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 810 at the 2010 census.

Litchfield, New York Town in New York, United States

Litchfield, is a town in Herkimer County, New York, United States. The population was 1,513 at the 2010 census. The town is named after Litchfield, Connecticut, the source of some early settlers of the city.

Canaan, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Canaan is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 1,234 at the 2010 census, up from 1,081 at the 2000 census. The town of Canaan is often referred to locally by the name of its principal settlement, Falls Village.

References

  1. 1 2 "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001), Goshen town, Litchfield County, Connecticut". American FactFinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved October 7, 2019.
  2. The Connecticut Magazine: An Illustrated Monthly. Connecticut Magazine Company. 1903. p. 332.
  3. "History of the Town of Goshen, Connecticut," Page 72, 1897
  4. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Archived from the original on May 23, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  5. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  6. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  7. "Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of October 25, 2005" (PDF). Connecticut Secretary of State. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 23, 2006. Retrieved 2006-10-02.