National Register of Historic Places architectural style categories

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In the United States, the National Register of Historic Places classifies its listings by various types of architecture . Listed properties often are given one or more of 40 standard architectural style classifications that appear in the National Register Information System (NRIS) database. Other properties are given a custom architectural description with "vernacular" or other qualifiers, and others have no style classification. Many National Register-listed properties do not fit into the several categories listed here, or they fit into more specialized subcategories. [1]

Contents

Complete list of architectural style codes

The complete list of the 40 architectural style codes in the National Register Information System—NRIS follows: [1]

ObsARSTYLCDARSTYL
101NO STYLE LISTED
210COLONIAL
311 GEORGIAN
420EARLY REPUBLIC
521 FEDERAL
630MID 19TH CENTURY REVIVAL
731 GREEK REVIVAL
832 GOTHIC REVIVAL
933 ITALIAN VILLA
1034EXOTIC REVIVAL
1140LATE VICTORIAN
1241 GOTHIC
1342 ITALIANATE
1443 SECOND EMPIRE
1544 STICK/EASTLAKE
1645 QUEEN ANNE
1746 SHINGLE STYLE
1847 ROMANESQUE
1948 RENAISSANCE
2049 OCTAGON MODE
2150LATE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURY REVIVALS
2251 COLONIAL REVIVAL
2352 CLASSICAL REVIVAL
2453 TUDOR REVIVAL
2554 LATE GOTHIC REVIVAL
2655 MISSION/SPANISH REVIVAL
2756 BEAUX ARTS
2857 PUEBLO
2960LATE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN MOVEMENTS
3061 PRAIRIE SCHOOL
3162EARLY COMMERCIAL
3263 CHICAGO
3364SKYSCRAPER
3465 BUNGALOW/CRAFTSMAN
3570 MODERN MOVEMENT
3671 MODERNE
3772 INTERNATIONAL STYLE
3873 ART DECO
3980OTHER
4090MIXED (MORE THAN 2 STYLES FROM DIFFERENT PERIODS)

Selected NRIS styles

Some selected National Register Information System (NRIS) styles, with examples, include:

Federal architecture

Federal architecture was the classicizing architecture style built in the newly founded United States between c. 1780 and 1830. Examples include: the Old Town Hall in Massachusetts, and Plumb House in Virginia.

Facade pediment of Simsbury Townhouse, Connecticut. Simsbury Townhouse.JPG
Facade pediment of Simsbury Townhouse, Connecticut.
Greek Revival facade of Melrose plantation house, Mississippi. Melrose-Natchez-MS.jpg
Greek Revival facade of Melrose plantation house, Mississippi.

Greek Revival architecture

Greek Revival architecture is a Neoclassical movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries in Europe. It emerged in the U.S. following the War of 1812 and while a revolutionary war in Greece attracted America's interest. Greek Revival architecture was popularized by Minard Lafever's pattern books: The Young Builders' General Instructor in 1829, the Modern Builders' Guide in 1833, The Beauties of Modern Architecture in 1835, and The Architectural Instructor in 1850.

Greek Revival in the U.S. includes vernacular versions such as the 1839 Simsbury Townhouse built by an unknown craftsman [2] and the Dicksonia Plantation, and high-style versions such as the Second Bank of the United States, Philadelphia.

Plantation houses

Many plantation houses in the Southern United States were built in Greek Revival variations, including Millford Plantation, Melrose, Gaineswood, and Annandale Plantation

Palladian Revival architecture

Examples of the American revival of classical Palladian architecture include: The Rotunda by Thomas Jefferson at the University of Virginia, and the Hammond-Harwood House in Annapolis, Maryland.

Late Victorian Carson Mansion in Eureka, California. Carson mansion.jpg
Late Victorian Carson Mansion in Eureka, California.

Late Victorian architecture

Late Victorian architecture is widely distributed on the register's listings, for many building types in every state. The Carpenter Gothic style was popular for Late Victorian wooden churches.

Queen Anne

The Queen Anne style was popular in later American Victorian architecture, after the earlier Italianate style, and is frequent on NRHP residential listings. The Shingle Style is an American variation of Queen Anne.

Late 19th and 20th Century Revivals

A grouping of historicist architecture Revival styles, with the title Late 19th and 20th Century Revivals, has been applied by the NRHP for many listings. There are numerous listed buildings designed in an amalgam of several to many revival styles that defy a singular or simpler classification title.

Santa Barbara station, in Mission Revival style. PostcardSantaBarbaraCARailroadStation1910.jpg
Santa Barbara station, in Mission Revival style.
Santa Fe Depot (San Diego), in Spanish Colonial Revival style. San Diego-Union Depot post card ca 1920.jpg
Santa Fe Depot (San Diego), in Spanish Colonial Revival style.

Mission/Spanish Revival

Mission/Spanish Revival is an amalgam of two distinct styles popular in different but adjacent eras: the primarily late-19th-century Mission Revival Style architecture and early-20th-century (and later) Spanish Colonial Revival architecture. The combined term, or the individual terms, are often used in the style classifications of NRHP listed buildings. [1]

Pueblo Revival

Pueblo Revival Style architecture is a revival style based on traditional Native American Pueblo architecture of adobe dwellings–communities in the Pueblo culture, primarily in present-day New Mexico, northeastern Arizona, and southwestern Colorado.

Examples include the Institute of American Indian Arts, La Fonda on the Plaza, and the Mabel Dodge Luhan House in New Mexico, and the Painted Desert Inn in Arizona.

Exotic Revival architecture

Exotic Revival architecture is another style that may reflect a mix of Moorish Revival architecture, Egyptian Revival architecture, and other influences. Just a few of many National Register-listed places identified with this style are El Zaribah Shrine Auditorium, Odd Fellows Rest Cemetery, Fort Smith Masonic Temple, and Algeria Shrine Temple. [1]

Examples in California include Grauman's Chinese Theatre and Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood, the Citadel Outlets in Commerce near Los Angeles, and the Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum in San Jose.

Mayan Revival

The Mayan Revival architecture style frequently blends Maya architectural and artistic motifs with those of other Mesoamerican cultures, particularly of Aztec architecture.

Examples include: the Mayan Theater in Downtown Los Angeles; the Hollyhock House by Frank Lloyd Wright in East Hollywood; and the Aztec Hotel on historic U.S. Route 66 in Southern California.

Postmedieval English

"Postmedieval English" architecture is a style term used for a number of NRHP listings, including William Ward Jr. House in Middlefield, Connecticut.

Late 19th and Early 20th Century American Movements

"Late 19th and Early 20th Century American Movements" are revival styles and other American architectural movements, that originated during increasing development in the United States during the Second Industrial Revolution of the late 19th century, and continuing development and urbanization during the early 20th century before World War I.

Arts

'American Movements' is a broader design and art movement phrase used in the visual arts of the United States. It refers to U.S. centric art and design movements that originated during any century of the country's history.

Gamble House, an American Craftsman style bungalow, California. Gamble House.jpg
Gamble House, an American Craftsman style bungalow, California.
Richard Nixon's birthplace bungalow. Nixon Presidential Library & Museum (30909040585).jpg
Richard Nixon's birthplace bungalow.

Bungalow/Craftsman

Bungalow/Craftsman is a term commonly appearing in NRHP listings, which reflects American Craftsman and Bungalow styles.

American Craftsman is often a term used for the Arts and Crafts movement works and philosophy expressed in the United States. It can include domestic architecture, interior design, landscape design, applied arts, decorative arts, and the fine arts. Many Craftsman and other style influenced California bungalow houses were popular and built nationwide into the 1930s.

Very large and well detailed custom residences are described as ultimate bungalows, such as the works by Greene and Greene in California. Examples include: the Gamble House in Pasadena, and the Thorsen House in Berkeley. Smaller American Craftsman homes include: Batchelder House and Holmes-Shannon House. Bungalow examples include the Birthplace of Richard Nixon and the Lanterman House. Bungalow courts include: Palmetto Court and Gartz Court.

Early Commercial

There are hundreds of National Register-listed buildings of the Early Commercial architecture type. [1]

The style may be a subtype/predecessor of the full Chicago School style architecture. [ citation needed ]

Plains Commercial

Plains Commercial architecture and Plains Commercial Style is another variant of the Chicago School style.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. March 13, 2009.
  2. Jan Cunningham (July 15, 1992). "National Register of Historic Places Registration: Simsbury Townhouse / Boy Scout Hall". National Park Service. and Accompanying 5 photos, exterior and interior, from 1992 (see captions page 7 of text document)