National Register of Historic Places listings in Massachusetts

Last updated
Distribution of listings by county as of September 2014 NRHP Massachusetts Map.svg
Distribution of listings by county as of September 2014

This is a list of properties and districts in Massachusetts listed on the National Register of Historic Places. There are over 4,300 listings in the state, representing about 5% of all NRHP listings nationwide and the second-most of any U.S. state, behind only New York. Listings appear in all 14 Massachusetts counties.

Contents

Contents: Counties in Massachusetts

Barnstable | Berkshire | Bristol | Dukes | Essex | Franklin | Hampden | Hampshire | Middlesex | Nantucket | Norfolk | Plymouth | Suffolk | Worcester

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted January 21, 2022. [1]
Church on the Hill, in Berkshire County Church on the Hill, Lenox, Massachusetts.JPG
Church on the Hill, in Berkshire County
House of the Seven Gables, in Salem, Essex County House of the Seven Gables (front angle) - Salem, Massachusetts.jpg
House of the Seven Gables, in Salem, Essex County
Sankaty Head Light, in Nantucket Nantucket light 1.jpg
Sankaty Head Light, in Nantucket
Faneuil Hall, Boston, Suffolk County Faneuil Hall Boston Massachusetts.JPG
Faneuil Hall, Boston, Suffolk County
The Flying Horses Carousel, Oak Bluffs, Martha's Vineyard, Dukes County Flying horses carousel.JPG
The Flying Horses Carousel, Oak Bluffs, Martha's Vineyard, Dukes County
The Ware-Hardwick Covered Bridge, Hampshire and Worcester Counties Ware-Hardwick Covered Bridge, Gilbertville, MA.jpg
The Ware-Hardwick Covered Bridge, Hampshire and Worcester Counties
The PT 796, Fall River, Bristol County PT 796.jpg
The PT 796, Fall River, Bristol County
The Alvah Stone Mill, Montague, Franklin County Montague - The Bookmill.jpg
The Alvah Stone Mill, Montague, Franklin County
County# of sites
1.1 Barnstable: Barnstable 85
1.2 Barnstable: Harwich 4
1.3 Barnstable: Other 119
1.4Barnstable: Duplicates(4) [lower-alpha 1]
1.5Barnstable: Total204
2 Berkshire 175
3.1 Bristol: Fall River 102
3.2 Bristol: New Bedford 43
3.3 Bristol: Taunton 96
3.4 Bristol: Other 135
3.5Bristol: Duplicates(1) [lower-alpha 2]
3.6Bristol: Total375
4 Dukes 22
5.1 Essex: Andover 51
5.2 Essex: Gloucester 35
5.3 Essex: Ipswich 31
5.4 Essex: Lawrence 24
5.5 Essex: Lynn 29
5.6 Essex: Methuen 45
5.7 Essex: Salem 46
5.8 Essex: Other 219
5.9Essex: Duplicates(3) [lower-alpha 3]
5.10Essex: Total477
6 Franklin 61
7.1 Hampden: Springfield 90
7.2 Hampden: Other 75
7.3Hampden: Total165
8 Hampshire 82
9.1 Middlesex: Arlington 64
9.2 Middlesex: Cambridge 206
9.3 Middlesex: Concord 27
9.4 Middlesex: Framingham 18
9.5 Middlesex: Lexington 17
9.6 Middlesex: Lowell 41
9.7 Middlesex: Marlborough 17
9.8 Middlesex: Medford 36
9.9 Middlesex: Newton 187
9.10 Middlesex: Reading 90
9.11 Middlesex: Sherborn 25
9.12 Middlesex: Somerville 84
9.13 Middlesex: Stoneham 69
9.14 Middlesex: Wakefield 95
9.15 Middlesex: Waltham 109
9.16 Middlesex: Weston 15
9.17 Middlesex: Winchester 68
9.18 Middlesex: Other 195
9.19Middlesex: Duplicates(31) [lower-alpha 4]
9.20Middlesex: Total1,332
10 Nantucket 4
11.1 Norfolk: Brookline 98
11.2 Norfolk: Milton 30
11.3 Norfolk: Quincy 109
11.4 Norfolk: Other 124
11.5Norfolk: Duplicates(4) [lower-alpha 5]
11.6Norfolk: Total357
12 Plymouth 139
13.1 Suffolk: Northern Boston 148
13.2 Suffolk: Southern Boston 174
13.3 Suffolk: Other 23
13.4Suffolk: Duplicates(2) [lower-alpha 6]
13.5Suffolk: Total343
14.1 Worcester: Southbridge 83
14.2 Worcester: Uxbridge 53
14.3 Worcester: Eastern Worcester city 98
14.4 Worcester: Northwestern Worcester city 108
14.5 Worcester: Southwestern Worcester city 81
14.6 Worcester: Northern Worcester County 74
14.7 Worcester: Other 182
14.8Worcester: Duplicates(5) [lower-alpha 7]
14.9Worcester: Total670
(duplicates):(46) [lower-alpha 8]
Total:4,364

Notes

  1. The following historic resource within Barnstable County is included on multiple area lists:
  2. The following historic resource within Bristol County is included on multiple area lists:
  3. The following historic resources within Essex County are included on multiple area lists:
  4. The following historic resources within Middlesex County are included on multiple area lists:
  5. The following historic resources within Norfolk County are included on multiple area lists:
  6. The following historic resources within Boston are included both of the northern Boston and southern Boston multiple area lists:
  7. The following historic resources within Worcester County are included on multiple area lists:
  8. The following historic resources are included within multiple county lists:

See also

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Mystic Valley Parkway

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Lynn Fells Parkway

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References