List of United States senators from Alaska

Last updated

Current delegation

Alaska was admitted to the Union on January 3, 1959. Alaska's United States Senate seats belong to Class 2 and Class 3. The state's current senators are Republicans Lisa Murkowski (serving since 2002) and Dan Sullivan (serving since 2015). A total of eight people have represented Alaska in the U.S. Senate.

Contents

List of senators

Class 2

Class 2 U.S. senators belong to the electoral cycle that were first elected in 1958 for only one Congress (the 86th Congress), and then the seat was contested again for the 87th Congress, 90th Congress, and every three Congresses (six years) thereafter. The seat in recent years has been contested in 2008, 2014, and 2020. The next election will be in 2026.

C

Class 3

Class 3 U.S. senators belong to the electoral cycle that were first elected in 1958 for two Congresses (the 86th Congress and 87th Congress), and then the seat was contested again for the 88th Congress, 91st Congress, and every three Congresses (six years) thereafter. The seat in recent years has been contested in 2004, 2010, and 2016. The next election will be in 2022.

#SenatorPartyDates in officeElectoral historyTTElectoral historyDates in officePartySenator#
1 Edward Lewis Bartlett.jpg
Bob Bartlett
Democratic January 3, 1959 –
December 11, 1968
Elected in 1958.1 86th 1 Elected in 1958.January 3, 1959 –
January 3, 1969
Democratic Ernest Gruening (D-AK).jpg
Ernest Gruening
1
Re-elected in 1960.2 87th
88th 2 Re-elected in 1962.

Lost renomination.
89th
Re-elected in 1966.

Died.
3 90th
VacantDecember 11, 1968 –
December 24, 1968
 
2 Ted Stevens.jpg
Ted Stevens
Republican December 24, 1968 –
January 3, 2009
Appointed to continue Bartlett's term.

Elected in 1970 to finish Bartlett's term.
91st 3 Elected in 1968.January 3, 1969 –
January 3, 1981
Democratic Mikegravel.jpg
Mike Gravel
2
92nd
Re-elected in 1972.4 93rd
94th 4 Re-elected in 1974.

Lost renomination.
95th
Re-elected in 1978.5 96th
97th 5 Elected in 1980.January 3, 1981 –
December 2, 2002
Republican Frank Murkowski, 105th Congress photo.jpg
Frank Murkowski
3
98th
Re-elected in 1984.6 99th
100th 6 Re-elected in 1986.
101st
Re-elected in 1990.7 102nd
103rd 7 Re-elected in 1992.
104th
Re-elected in 1996.8 105th
106th 8 Re-elected in 1998.

Resigned to become Governor of Alaska.
107th
 December 2, 2002 –
December 20, 2002
Vacant
Appointed to finish her father's term.December 20, 2002 –
Present
Republican Lisa Murkowski.jpg
Lisa Murkowski
4
Re-elected in 2002.

Lost re-election.
9 108th
109th 9 Elected to full term in 2004.
110th
3 Mark Begich, official portrait, 112th Congress.jpg
Mark Begich
Democratic January 3, 2009 –
January 3, 2015
Elected in 2008.

Lost re-election.
10 111th
112th 10 Lost renomination, but re-elected as a write-in candidate in 2010.
113th
4 Senator Dan Sullivan official.jpg
Dan Sullivan
Republican January 3, 2015 –
Present
Elected in 2014.11 114th
115th 11 Re-elected in 2016.
116th
Re-elected in 2020.12 117th
118th 12To be determined in the 2022 election.
119th
To be determined in the 2026 election.13 120th
#SenatorPartyYears in officeElectoral historyT TElectoral historyYears in officePartySenator#
Class 2 Class 3

Living former senators

As of January 2021, there are three living former senators from Alaska. The most recent and most recently serving senator to die was Ted Stevens (December 24, 1968 – January 3, 2009) on August 9, 2010.


SenatorTerm of officeDate of birth (and age)
Mike Gravel January 3, 1969 – January 3, 1981May 13, 1930 (age 90)
Frank Murkowski January 3, 1981 – December 2, 2002March 28, 1933 (age 87)
Mark Begich January 3, 2009 – January 3, 2015March 30, 1962 (age 58)

In Fiction

They Shall Have Stars, the first volume in science fiction writer James Blish's Cities in Flight series, was published in 1950 and is set in a fictional 2013. A major character is Alaska Senator Bliss Wagoner, head of the Joint Congressional Committee on Space Flight, who is depicted as playing a crucial role in Humanity's spread into space. At the time of writing, Alaska was not yet a state and had no Senators, but Blish correctly assumed that this would come about by 2013.

See also

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