United States congressional delegations from Texas

Last updated
Texas's congressional districts since 2013. Pagecgd113 tx.pdf
Texas's congressional districts since 2013.

These are tables of congressional delegations from the State of Texas to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives.

Texas State of the United States of America

Texas is the second largest state in the United States by both area and population. Geographically located in the South Central region of the country, Texas shares borders with the U.S. states of Louisiana to the east, Arkansas to the northeast, Oklahoma to the north, New Mexico to the west, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas to the southwest, and has a coastline with the Gulf of Mexico to the southeast.

United States Senate Upper house of the United States Congress

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislature of the United States. The Senate chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol Building, in Washington, D.C.

United States House of Representatives lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the Lower House of the United States Congress, the Senate being the Upper House. Together they compose the national legislature of the United States.

Contents

U.S. House delegation

Current districts and representatives

The delegation consists of 36 members, with 23 Republicans, and 13 Democrats as of 2018.

Republican Party (United States) Major political party in the United States

The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP, is one of the two major political parties in the United States; the other is its historic rival, the Democratic Party.

Democratic Party (United States) Major political party in the United States

The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with its rival, the Republican Party. Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest active political party.

The 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas were held on Tuesday, November 6, 2018. Voters will elect the 36 U.S. Representatives from the state of Texas, one from each of the state's 36 congressional districts. The elections coincided with the elections of other offices, including the gubernatorial election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. The primaries were held on March 6 and the run-offs were held on May 22.

DistrictMemberDistrict
Member
(Residence)
PartyIncumbency CPVI Map
1st Louie Gohmert official congressional photo.jpg
Louie Gohmert
(Tyler)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2005R+25 Texas US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
2nd Dan Crenshaw, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Dan Crenshaw
(Houston)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2019R+11 Texas US Congressional District 2 (since 2013).tif
3rd Van Taylor, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Van Taylor
(Plano)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2019R+13 Texas US Congressional District 3 (since 2013).tif
4th John Ratcliffe Portrait 114thCong2.jpg
John Ratcliffe
(Heath)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2015R+28 Texas US Congressional District 4 (since 2013).tif
5th Lance Gooden, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Lance Gooden
(Terrell)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2019R+16 Texas US Congressional District 5 (since 2013).tif
6th Ron Wright, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Ron Wright
(Arlington)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2019R+9 Texas US Congressional District 6 (since 2013).tif
7th Lizzie Fletcher, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Lizzie Pannill Fletcher
(Houston)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2019R+7 Texas US Congressional District 7 (since 2013).tif
8th Kevin Brady official photo.jpg
Kevin Brady
(The Woodlands)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 1997R+28 Texas US Congressional District 8 (since 2013).tif
9th Al Green Official (cropped).jpg
Al Green
(Houston)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2005D+29 Texas US Congressional District 9 (since 2013).tif
10th Michael McCaul official photo.jpg
Michael McCaul
(West Lake Hills)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2005R+9 Texas US Congressional District 10 (since 2013).tif
11th Mike Conaway official congressional photo.jpg
Mike Conaway
(Midland)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2005R+32 Texas US Congressional District 11 (since 2013).tif
12th Kay Granger.jpg
Kay Granger
(Fort Worth)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 1997R+18 Texas US Congressional District 12 (since 2013).tif
13th Mac Thornberry, Official Portrait, 111th Congress.jpg
Mac Thornberry
(Clarendon)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 1995R+33 Texas US Congressional District 13 (since 2013).tif
14th Randy Weber official congressional photo.jpg
Randy Weber
(Alvin)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2013R+12 Texas US Congressional District 14 (since 2013).tif
15th Vicente Gonzalez 115th congress photo.jpg
Vicente Gonzalez
(McAllen)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2017D+7 Texas US Congressional District 15 (since 2013).tif
16th Veronica Escobar official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Veronica Escobar
(El Paso)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2019D+17 Texas US Congressional District 16 (since 2013).tif
17th Bill Flores, Official Portrait, 112th Congress.jpg
Bill Flores
(Bryan)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2011R+12 Texas US Congressional District 17 (since 2013).tif
18th Sheila Jackson-Lee.jpg
Sheila Jackson Lee
(Houston)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 1995D+27 Texas US Congressional District 18 (since 2013).tif
19th Jodey Arrington 115th congress photo.jpg
Jodey Arrington
(Lubbock)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2017R+27 Texas US Congressional District 19 (since 2013).tif
20th Joaquin Castro, official portrait, 113th Congress.jpg
Joaquin Castro
(San Antonio)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2013D+10 Texas US Congressional District 20 (since 2013).tif
21st Chip Roy, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Chip Roy
(Austin)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2019R+10 Texas US Congressional District 21 (since 2013).tif
22nd Pete Olson official congressional photo.jpg
Pete Olson
(Sugar Land)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2009R+10 Texas US Congressional District 22 (since 2013).tif
23rd Will Hurd Texas.jpg
Will Hurd
(Helotes)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2015R+1 Texas US Congressional District 23 (since 2013).tif
24th Kenny Marchant Official.jpg
Kenny Marchant
(Coppell)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2005R+9 Texas US Congressional District 24 (since 2013).tif
25th Roger Williams official congressional photo.jpg
Roger Williams
(Weatherford)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2013R+11 Texas US Congressional District 25 (since 2013).tif
26th Michael Burgess official photo.jpg
Michael Burgess
(Highland Village)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2003R+18 Texas US Congressional District 26 (since 2013).tif
27th Michael Cloud, Official Portrait, 115th Congress.jpg
Michael Cloud
(Victoria)
RepublicanJuly 14, 2018R+13 Texas US Congressional District 27 (since 2013).tif
28th Henry Cuellar, official portrait, 115th congress.jpg
Henry Cuellar
(Laredo)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2005D+9 Texas US Congressional District 28 (since 2013).tif
29th Sylvia Garcia, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Sylvia Garcia
(Houston)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2019D+19 Texas US Congressional District 29 (since 2013).tif
30th Eddie Bernice Johnson official portrait 116th Congress.jpg
Eddie Bernice Johnson
(Dallas)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 1993D+29 Texas US Congressional District 30 (since 2013).tif
31st Rep. John Carter (RTX).jpg
John Carter
(Round Rock)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2003R+10 Texas US Congressional District 31 (since 2013).tif
32nd Colin Allred, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Colin Allred
(Dallas)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2019R+5 Texas US Congressional District 32 (since 2013).tif
33rd Marc Veasey official photo.jpg
Marc Veasey
(Fort Worth)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2013D+23 Texas US Congressional District 33 (since 2013).tif
34th Filemon Vela, Official Portrait, 113th Congress.jpg
Filemon Vela Jr.
(Brownsville)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2013D+10 Texas US Congressional District 34 (since 2013).tif
35th Lloyd Doggett, Official Portrait, c112th Congress.jpg
Lloyd Doggett
(Austin)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 1995D+15 Texas US Congressional District 35 (since 2013).tif
36th Brian Babin 115th Congress.jpg
Brian Babin
(Woodville)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2015R+26 Texas US Congressional District 36 (since 2013).tif

Recent historical district boundaries

Below is a table of United States congressional district boundary maps for the State of Texas, presented chronologically. [2] All 10 redistricting events that took place in Texas in the decades between 1973 and 2013 are illustrated here.

YearStatewide map
1973–1975 United States Congressional Districts in Texas, 1973-1974.tif
1975–1983 United States Congressional Districts in Texas, 1975-1982.tif
1983–1985 United States Congressional Districts in Texas, 1983-1984.tif
1985–1993 United States Congressional Districts in Texas, 1985-1992.tif
1993–1997 United States Congressional Districts in Texas, 1993-1996.tif
1997–2003 United States Congressional Districts in Texas, 1997-2002.tif
2003–2005 United States Congressional Districts in Texas, 2003-2004.tif
2005–2007 United States Congressional Districts in Texas, 2005-2006.tif
2007–2013 United States Congressional Districts in Texas, 2007-2013.tif
2013 – Present United States Congressional Districts in Texas, since 2013(2).tif

1845 to 1863: 2 seats

Upon statehood, Texas was apportioned two seats.

CongressDistrictCongress
1st 2nd
29th
1845–1847
David S. Kaufman
(D)
Timothy Pilsbury
(D)
29th
1845–1847
30th
1847–1849
30th
1847–1849
31st
1849–1851
Volney E. Howard
(D)
31st
1849–1851
32nd
1851–1853
Richardson A. Scurry
(D)
32nd
1851–1853
33rd
1853–1855
George W. Smyth
(D)
Peter H. Bell
(D)
33rd
1853–1855
34th
1855–1857
Lemuel D. Evans
(KN)
34th
1855–1857
35th
1857–1859
John H. Reagan
(D)
Guy M. Bryan
(D)
35th
1857–1859
36th
1859–1861
Andrew J. Hamilton
(Ind. D)
36th
1859–1861
37th
1861–1863
American Civil War 37th
1861–1863

1863 to 1873: 4 seats

After the 1860 United States Census, Texas gained two seats.

1860 United States Census National census

The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States starting June 1, 1860, and lasting five months. It determined the population of the United States to be 31,443,321, an increase of 35.4 percent over the 23,191,875 persons enumerated during the 1850 Census. The total population included 3,953,761 slaves.

CongressDistrictCongress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th
38th
1863–1865
American Civil War 38th
1863–1865
39th
1865–1867
39th
1865–1867
40th
1867–1869
40th
1867–1869
41st
1869–1871
41st
1869–1871
George W. Whitmore
(R)
John C. Conner
(D)
William T. Clark
(R)
Edward Degener
(R)
42nd
1871–1873
William S. Herndon
(D)
John Hancock
(D)
42nd
1871–1873
De Witt C. Giddings
(D)

1873 to 1883: 6 seats

After the 1870 United States Census, Texas gained two seats. At first, the state used at-large seats, but after 1875 all the seats were districted.

1870 United States Census Ninth U.S. national census; first to provide detailed demographic info on African Americans

The United States Census of 1870 was the ninth United States Census. It was conducted by the Census Bureau from June 1,1870 to August 23, 1871. The 1870 Census was the first census to provide detailed information on the African-American population, only five years after the culmination of the Civil War when slaves were granted freedom. The total population was 38,925,598 with a resident of 38,558,371 individuals, a 22.62% increase from 1860. The 1870 Census' population estimate was controversial, as many believed it underestimated the true population numbers, especially in New York and Pennsylvania.

CongressDistrictCongress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
43rd
1873–1875
William S. Herndon
(D)
William P. McLean
(D)
De Witt C. Giddings
(D)
John Hancock
(D)
Roger Q. Mills
( At-large )
(D)
Asa H. Willie
( At-large )
(D)
43rd
1873–1875
44th
1875–1877
John H. Reagan
(D)
David B. Culberson
(D)
James W. Throckmorton
(D)
Roger Q. Mills
(D)
John Hancock
(D)
Gustave Schleicher
(D)
44th
1875–1877
45th
1877–1879
De Witt C. Giddings
(D)
45th
1877–1879
46th
1879–1881
Olin Wellborn
(D)
George W. Jones
(GB)
Christopher C. Upson
(D)
46th
1879–1881
47th
1881–1883
47th
1881–1883

1883 to 1893: 11 seats

After the 1880 United States Census, Texas gained five seats.

1880 United States Census 10th U.S. national census

The United States Census of 1880 conducted by the Census Bureau during June 1880 was the tenth United States Census. It was the first time that women were permitted to be enumerators. The Superintendent of the Census was Francis Amasa Walker. This was the first census in which a city – New York – recorded a population of over one million.

CongressDistrictDistrictCongress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th
48th
1883–1885
Charles Stewart
(D)
John H. Reagan
(D)
James H. Jones
(D)
David B. Culberson
(D)
James W. Throckmorton
(D)
Olin Wellborn
(D)
Thomas P. Ochiltree
(I)
James Francis Miller
(D)
Roger Q. Mills
(D)
John Hancock
(D)
S.W.T. Lanham
(D)
48th
1883–1885
49th
1885–1887
William H. Crain
(D)
Joseph D. Sayers
(D)
49th
1885–1887
50th
1887–1889
William H. Martin
(D)
Constantine B. Kilgore
(D)
Silas Hare
(D)
Jo Abbott
(D)
Littleton W. Moore
(D)
50th
1887–1889
51st
1889–1891
51st
1889–1891
52nd
1891–1893
John B. Long
(D)
Joseph W. Bailey
(D)
52nd
1891–1893
Edwin Le Roy Antony
(D)

1893 to 1903: 13 seats

After the 1890 United States Census, Texas gained two seats.

CongressDistrictDistrictCongress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th
53rd
1893–1895
Joseph Chappell Hutcheson
(D)
Samuel B. Cooper
(D)
Constantine B. Kilgore
(D)
David B. Culberson
(D)
Joseph W. Bailey
(D)
Jo Abbott
(D)
George C. Pendleton
(D)
Charles K. Bell
(D)
Joseph D. Sayers
(D)
Walter Gresham
(D)
William H. Crain
(D)
Thomas M. Paschal
(D)
Jeremiah V. Cockrell
(D)
53rd
1893–1895
54th
1895–1897
C. H. Yoakum
(D)
Miles Crowley
(D)
George H. Noonan
(R)
54th
1895–1897
Rudolph Kleberg
(D)
55th
1897–1899
Thomas Henry Ball
(D)
Reese C. De Graffenreid
(D)
John W. Cranford
(D)
Robert E. Burke
(D)
Robert L. Henry
(D)
Samuel W.T. Lanham
(D)
Robert B. Hawley
(R)
James L. Slayden
(D)
John H. Stephens
(D)
55th
1897–1899
56th
1899–1901
John Levi Sheppard
(D)
Albert S. Burleson
(D)
56th
1899–1901
57th
1901–1903
Choice B. Randell
(D)
George F. Burgess
(D)
57th
1901–1903
Gordon J. Russell
(D)
Morris Sheppard
(D)
Dudley G. Wooten
(D)

1903 to 1913: 16 seats

After the 1900 United States Census, Texas gained three seats.

CongressDistrictDistrictCongress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th
58th
1903–1905
Morris Sheppard
(D)
Samuel B. Cooper
(D)
Gordon J. Russell
(D)
Choice B. Randell
(D)
James Andrew Beall
(D)
Scott Field
(D)
Alexander W. Gregg
(D)
Thomas Henry Ball
(D)
George F. Burgess
(D)
Albert S. Burleson
(D)
Robert L. Henry
(D)
Oscar W. Gillespie
(D)
John H. Stephens
(D)
James L. Slayden
(D)
John Nance Garner
(D)
William R. Smith
(D)
58th
1903–1905
John M. Pinckney
(D)
59th
1905–1907
Moses L. Broocks
(D)
John M. Moore
(D)
59th
1905–1907
60th
1907–1909
Samuel B. Cooper
(D)
Rufus Hardy
(D)
60th
1907–1909
61st
1909–1911
Martin Dies
(D)
61st
1909–1911
Robert M. Lively
(D)
62nd
1911–1913
James Young
(D)
Oscar Callaway
(D)
62nd
1911–1913

1913 to 1933: 18 seats

After the 1910 United States Census, Texas gained two seats. At first, they were elected at-large, but starting in 1919 all were districted. There was not a reapportionment after the 1920 United States Census.

CongressDistrictDistrictCongress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th
63rd
1913–1915
Horace Worth Vaughan
(D)
Martin Dies
(D)
James Young
(D)
Sam Rayburn
(D)
James Andrew Beall
(D)
Rufus Hardy
(D)
Alexander W. Gregg
(D)
Joe H. Eagle
(D)
George F. Burgess
(D)
James P. Buchanan
(D)
Robert L. Henry
(D)
Oscar Callaway
(D)
John H. Stephens
(D)
James L. Slayden
(D)
John Nance Garner
(D)
William R. Smith
(D)
Daniel E. Garrett
( At-large )
(D)
Hatton W. Sumners
( At-large )
(D)
63rd
1913–1915
64th
1915–1917
Eugene Black
(D)
Hatton W. Sumners
(D)
James H. Davis
( At-large )
(D)
A. Jeff McLemore
( At-large )
(D)
64th
1915–1917
65th
1917–1919
Joseph J. Mansfield
(D)
Tom T. Connally
(D)
James Clifton Wilson
(D)
John Marvin Jones
(D)
Thomas L. Blanton
(D)
Daniel E. Garrett
( At-large )
(D)
65th
1917–1919
66th
1919–1921
John C. Box
(D)
Clay Stone Briggs
(D)
Fritz G. Lanham
(D)
Lucian W. Parrish
(D)
Carlos Bee
(D)
Claude Benton Hudspeth
(D)
Thomas L. Blanton
(D)
John Marvin Jones
(D)
66th
1919–1921
67th
1921–1923
Morgan G. Sanders
(D)
Daniel E. Garrett
(D)
Harry M. Wurzbach
(R)
67th
1921–1923
Guinn Williams
(D)
68th
1923–1925
Luther A. Johnson
(D)
68th
1923–1925
69th
1925–1927
69th
1925–1927
70th
1927–1929
70th
1927–1929
71st
1929–1931
Wright Patman
(D)
Oliver H. Cross
(D)
Augustus McCloskey
(D)
Robert Quincy Lee
(D)
71st
1929–1931
Harry M. Wurzbach
(R)
Thomas L. Blanton
(D)
72nd
1931–1933
Martin Dies, Jr.
(D)
R. Ewing Thomason
(D)
72nd
1931–1933
Joe H. Eagle
(D)
Richard M. Kleberg
(D)

1933 to 1953: 21 seats

After the 1930 United States Census, Texas gained three seats. At first, they were elected at-large, but starting in 1935 all were districted. There was no reapportionment after the 1940 United States Census.

CongressDistrictDistrictDistrictCongress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st
73rd
1933–1935
Wright Patman
(D)
Martin Dies, Jr.
(D)
Morgan G. Sanders
(D)
Sam Rayburn
(D)
Hatton W. Sumners
(D)
Luther A. Johnson
(D)
Clark W. Thompson
(D)
Joe H. Eagle
(D)
Joseph J. Mansfield
(D)
James P. Buchanan
(D)
Oliver H. Cross
(D)
Fritz G. Lanham
(D)
William D. McFarlane
(D)
Richard M. Kleberg
(D)
Milton H. West
(D)
R. Ewing Thomason
(D)
Thomas L. Blanton
(D)
John Marvin Jones
(D)
Joseph W. Bailey, Jr.
( At-large )
(D)
Sterling P. Strong
( At-large )
(D)
George B. Terrell
( At-large )
(D)
73rd
1933–1935
74th
1935–1937
Nat Patton
(D)
George H. Mahon
(D)
Maury Maverick
(D)
Charles L. South
(D)
74th
1935–1937
75th
1937–1939
Albert Thomas
(D)
William R. Poage
(D)
Clyde L. Garrett
(D)
75th
1937–1939
76th
1939–1941
Lindley Beckworth
(D)
Lyndon B. Johnson
(D)
Ed Gossett
(D)
Paul J. Kilday
(D)
76th
1939–1941
77th
1941–1943
Sam M. Russell
(D)
Eugene Worley
(D)
77th
1941–1943
78th
1943–1945
O. Clark Fisher
(D)
78th
1943–1945
79th
1945–1947
Jesse M. Combs
(D)
Tom Pickett
(D)
John E. Lyle, Jr.
(D)
79th
1945–1947
80th
1947–1949
Joseph Franklin Wilson
(D)
Olin E. Teague
(D)
Wingate H. Lucas
(D)
Omar Burleson
(D)
80th
1947–1949
81st
1949–1951
Clark W. Thompson
(D)
W. Homer Thornberry
(D)
Lloyd M. Bentsen
(D)
Kenneth M. Regan
(D)
Ben H. Guill
(R)
81st
1949–1951
82nd
1951–1953
Frank N. Ikard
(D)
Walter E. Rogers
(D)
82nd
1951–1953

1953 to 1963: 22 seats

After the 1950 United States Census, Texas gained one seat. At first, it was elected at-large, but starting in 1959 all were districted.

CongressDistrictDistrictDistrictCongress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd
83rd
1953–1955
Wright Patman
(D)
Jack Brooks
(D)
Brady P. Gentry
(D)
Sam Rayburn
(D)
Joseph Franklin Wilson
(D)
Olin E. Teague
(D)
John V. Dowdy
(D)
Albert Thomas
(D)
Clark W. Thompson
(D)
W. Homer Thornberry
(D)
William R. Poage
(D)
Wingate H. Lucas
(D)
Frank N. Ikard
(D)
John E. Lyle, Jr.
(D)
Lloyd M. Bentsen
(D)
Kenneth M. Regan
(D)
Omar Burleson
(D)
Walter E. Rogers
(D)
George H. Mahon
(D)
Paul J. Kilday
(D)
O. Clark Fisher
(D)
Martin Dies Jr.
( At-large )
(D)
83rd
1953–1955
84th
1955–1957
Bruce R. Alger
(R)
Jim Wright
(D)
John J. Bell
(D)
Joe M. Kilgore
(D)
J. T. Rutherford
(D)
84th
1955–1957
85th
1957–1959
Lindley Beckworth
(D)
John Andrew Young
(D)
85th
1957–1959
86th
1959–1961
Robert R. Casey
(D)
86th
1959–1961
87th
1961–1963
87th
1961–1963

1963 to 1973: 23 seats

After the 1960 United States Census, Texas gained one seat. At first, it was elected at-large, but starting in 1967 all were districted.

CongressDistrictDistrictDistrictCongress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd
88th
1963–1965
Wright Patman
(D)
Jack Brooks
(D)
Lindley Beckworth
(D)
Ray Roberts
(D)
Bruce R. Alger
(R)
Olin E. Teague
(D)
John V. Dowdy
(D)
Albert Thomas
(D)
Clark W. Thompson
(D)
W. Homer Thornberry
(D)
William R. Poage
(D)
Jim Wright
(D)
Graham B. Purcell, Jr.
(D)
John Andrew Young
(D)
Joe M. Kilgore
(D)
Ed Foreman
(R)
Omar Burleson
(D)
Walter E. Rogers
(D)
George H. Mahon
(D)
Henry B. Gonzalez
(D)
O. Clark Fisher
(D)
Robert R. Casey
(D)
Joe R. Pool
( At-large )
(D)
88th
1963–1965
89th
1965–1967
Earle Cabell
(D)
Lera M. Thomas
(D)
J. J. Pickle
(D)
Kika de la Garza
(D)
Richard C. White
(D)
89th
1965–1967
90th
1967–1969
John Dowdy
(D)
Joe R. Pool
(D)
George H.W. Bush
(R)
Robert C. Eckhardt
(D)
Jack Brooks
(D)
Bob Price
(R)
Abraham Kazen, Jr.
(D)
90th
1967–1969
James M. Collins
(R)
91st
1969–1971
91st
1969–1971
92nd
1971–1973
Bill Archer
(R)
92nd
1971–1973

1973 to 1983: 24 seats

After the 1970 United States Census, Texas gained one seat.

CongressDistrictDistrictDistrictCongress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th
93rd
1973–1975
Wright Patman
(D)
Charlie Wilson
(D)
James M. Collins
(R)
Ray Roberts
(D)
Alan Steelman
(R)
Olin E. Teague
(D)
Bill Archer
(R)
Robert C. Eckhardt
(D)
Jack Brooks
(D)
J. J. Pickle
(D)
William R. Poage
(D)
Jim Wright
(D)
Bob Price
(R)
John Andrew Young
(D)
Kika de la Garza
(D)
Richard C. White
(D)
Omar Burleson
(D)
Barbara Jordan
(D)
George H. Mahon
(D)
Henry B. Gonzalez
(D)
O. Clark Fisher
(D)
Robert R. Casey
(D)
Abraham Kazen
(D)
Dale Milford
(D)
93rd
1973–1975
94th
1975–1977
Jack Hightower
(D)
Robert Krueger
(D)
94th
1975–1977
Sam B. Hall
(D)
95th
1977–1979
Jim Mattox
(D)
Robert Gammage
(D)
95th
1977–1979
96th
1979–1981
Phil Gramm
(D)
Marvin Leath
(D)
Joseph P. Wyatt, Jr.
(D)
Charles Stenholm
(D)
Mickey Leland
(D)
Kent Hance
(D)
Thomas Loeffler
(R)
Ron Paul
(R)
Martin Frost
(D)
96th
1979–1981
97th
1981–1983
Ralph M. Hall
(D)
Jack Fields
(R)
William N. Patman
(D)
97th
1981–1983

1983 to 1993: 27 seats

After the 1980 United States Census, Texas gained three seats.

CongressDistrictDistrictDistrictCongress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th
98th
1983–1985
Sam B. Hall
(D)
Charlie Wilson
(D)
Steve Bartlett
(R)
Ralph M. Hall
(D)
John W. Bryant
(D)
Phil Gramm
(R)
Bill Archer
(R)
Jack Fields
(R)
Jack Brooks
(D)
J. J. Pickle
(D)
Marvin Leath
(D)
Jim Wright
(D)
Jack Hightower
(D)
William N. Patman
(D)
Kika de la Garza
(D)
Ronald D. Coleman
(D)
Charles Stenholm
(D)
Mickey Leland
(D)
Kent Hance
(D)
Henry B. Gonzalez
(D)
Thomas Loeffler
(R)
Ron Paul
(R)
Abraham Kazen
(D)
Martin Frost
(D)
Michael A. Andrews
(D)
Tommy J. Vandergriff
(D)
Solomon P. Ortiz
(D)
98th
1983–1985
99th
1985–1987
Joe Barton
(R)
Beau Boulter
(R)
Mac Sweeney
(R)
Larry Combest
(R)
Tom DeLay
(R)
Albert G. Bustamante
(D)
Dick Armey
(R)
99th
1985–1987
Jim Chapman
(D)
100th
1987–1989
Lamar S. Smith
(R)
100th
1987–1989
101st
1989–1991
Bill Sarpalius
(D)
Greg Laughlin
(D)
101st
1989–1991
Pete Geren
(D)
Craig A. Washington
(D)
102nd
1991–1993
Chet Edwards
(D)
102nd
1991–1993
Sam Johnson
(R)

1993 to 2003: 30 seats

After the 1990 United States Census, Texas gained three seats.

CongressDistrictDistrictDistrictCongress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th
103rd
1993–1995
Jim Chapman
(D)
Charlie Wilson
(D)
Sam Johnson
(R)
Ralph M. Hall
(D)
John W. Bryant
(D)
Joe Barton
(R)
Bill Archer
(R)
Jack Fields
(R)
Jack Brooks
(D)
J. J. Pickle
(D)
Chet Edwards
(D)
Pete Geren
(D)
Bill Sarpalius
(D)
Greg Laughlin
(D)
Kika de la Garza
(D)
Ronald D. Coleman
(D)
Charles Stenholm
(D)
Craig A. Washington
(D)
Larry Combest
(R)
Henry B. Gonzalez
(D)
Lamar S. Smith
(R)
Tom DeLay
(R)
Henry Bonilla
(R)
Martin Frost
(D)
Michael A. Andrews
(D)
Dick Armey
(R)
Solomon P. Ortiz
(D)
Frank Tejeda
(D)
Gene Green
(D)
Eddie Bernice Johnson
(D)
103rd
1993–1995
104th
1995–1997
Steve Stockman
(R)
Lloyd Doggett
(D)
Mac Thornberry
(R)
Greg Laughlin
(R)
Sheila Jackson Lee
(D)
Kenneth E. Bentsen, Jr.
(D)
104th
1995–1997
105th
1997–1999
Max Sandlin
(D)
Jim Turner
(D)
Pete Sessions
(R)
Kevin Brady
(R)
Nick Lampson
(D)
Kay Granger
(R)
Ron Paul
(R)
Ruben Hinojosa
(D)
Silvestre Reyes
(D)
105th
1997–1999
106th
1999–2001
Charlie Gonzalez
(D)
Ciro D. Rodriguez
(D)
106th
1999–2001
107th
2001–2003
John Culberson
(R)
107th
2001–2003

2003 to 2013: 32 seats

Results of the 2003 redistricting. Texas redistricting - 2002 and 2004.png
Results of the 2003 redistricting.

After the 2000 United States Census, Texas gained two seats.

As typical, the delegation was redistricted for the 2002 elections. They were also redistricted in 2003, which gave Republicans a majority of seats after the 2004 elections.

CongressDistrictDistrictDistrictDistrictCongress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th 31st 32nd
108th
2003–2005
Max Sandlin
(D)
Jim Turner
(D)
Sam Johnson
(R)
Ralph Hall
(D)
Jeb Hensarling
(R)
Joe Barton
(R)
John Culberson
(R)
Kevin Brady
(R)
Nick Lampson
(D)
Lloyd Doggett
(D)
Chet Edwards
(D)
Kay Granger
(R)
Mac Thornberry
(R)
Ron Paul
(R)
Ruben Hinojosa
(D)
Silvestre Reyes
(D)
Charles Stenholm
(D)
Sheila Jackson Lee
(D)
Larry Combest
(R)
Charlie Gonzalez
(D)
Lamar S. Smith
(R)
Tom DeLay
(R)
Henry Bonilla
(R)
Martin Frost
(D)
Chris Bell
(D)
Michael Burgess
(R)
Solomon P. Ortiz
(D)
Ciro D. Rodriguez
(D)
Gene Green
(D)
Eddie Bernice Johnson
(D)
John Carter
(R)
Pete Sessions
(R)
108th
2003–2005
Randy Neugebauer
(R)
109th
2005–2007
Louie Gohmert
(R)
Ted Poe
(R)
Ralph Hall
(R)
Al Green
(D)
Michael McCaul
(R)
Mike Conaway
(R)
Chet Edwards
(D)
Kenny Marchant
(R)
Lloyd Doggett
(D)
Henry Cuellar
(D)
109th
2005–2007
Shelley Sekula-Gibbs
(R)
110th
2007–2009
Nick Lampson
(D)
Ciro Rodriguez
(D)
110th
2007–2009
111th
2009–2011
Pete Olson
(R)
111th
2009–2011
112th
2011–2013
Bill Flores
(R)
Quico Canseco
(R)
Blake Farenthold
(R)
112th
2011–2013

2013 to present

After the 2010 United States Census, Texas gained four seats.

CongressDistrictDistrictDistrictDistrictCongress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th 31st 32nd 33rd 34th 35th 36th
113th
2013–2015
Louie Gohmert
(R)
Ted Poe
(R)
Sam Johnson
(R)
Ralph Hall
(R)
Jeb Hensarling
(R)
Joe Barton
(R)
John Culberson
(R)
Kevin Brady
(R)
Al Green
(D)
Michael McCaul
(R)
Mike Conaway
(R)
Kay Granger
(R)
Mac Thornberry
(R)
Randy Weber
(R)
Ruben Hinojosa
(D)
Beto O'Rourke
(D)
Bill Flores
(R)
Sheila Jackson Lee
(D)
Randy Neugebauer
(R)
Joaquin Castro
(D)
Lamar S. Smith
(R)
Pete Olson
(R)
Pete Gallego
(D)
Kenny Marchant
(R)
Roger Williams
(R)
Michael Burgess
(R)
Blake Farenthold
(R)
Henry Cuellar
(D)
Gene Green
(D)
Eddie Bernice Johnson
(D)
John Carter
(R)
Pete Sessions
(R)
Marc Veasey
(D)
Filemon Vela
(D)
Lloyd Doggett
(D)
Steve Stockman
(R)
113th
2013–2015
114th
2015–2017
John Ratcliffe
(R)
Will Hurd
(R)
Brian Babin
(R)
114th
2015–2017
115th
2017–2019
Vicente González
(D)
Jodey Arrington
(R)
Michael Cloud (R) 115th
2017–2019
116th
2019–2021
Dan Crenshaw
(R)
Van Taylor
(R)
Lance Gooden
(R)
Ron Wright
(R)
Lizzie Fletcher
(D)
Veronica Escobar
(D)
Chip Roy
(R)
Sylvia Garcia
(D)
Colin Allred
(D)
116th
2019–2021
Congress 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th 31st 32nd 33rd 34th 35th 36th Congress

Living former Members of the House

RepresentativeTerm of officeDistrictDate of birth (and age)
Ed Foreman 1963–196516thDecember 22, 1933 (age 85)
Bill Archer 1971–20017thMarch 22, 1928 (age 91)
Alan Steelman 1973–19775thMarch 15, 1942 (age 77)
Bob Krueger 1975–197921stSeptember 19, 1935 (age 83)
Ron Paul 1976–1977
1979-1985
1997-2013
22nd
14th
August 20, 1935 (age 83)
Joseph P. Wyatt Jr. 1979–198114thOctober 12, 1941 (age 77)
Phil Gramm 1979–1983
1983-1985
6thJuly 8, 1942 (age 76)
Kent Hance 1979–198519thNovember 14, 1942 (age 76)
Tom Loeffler 1979–198721stAugust 1, 1946 (age 72)
Charles Stenholm 1979–200517thOctober 26, 1938 (age 80)
Martin Frost 1979–200524thJanuary 1, 1942 (age 77)
Jack Fields 1981–19978thFebruary 3, 1952 (age 67)
Steve Bartlett 1983–19913rdSeptember 19, 1947 (age 71)
Michael A. Andrews 1983–199525thFebruary 7, 1944 (age 75)
John Bryant 1983–19975thFebruary 22, 1947 (age 72)
Ronald D. Coleman 1983–199716thNovember 29, 1941 (age 77)
Solomon P. Ortiz 1983–201127thJune 3, 1937 (age 82)
Beau Boulter 1985–198913thFebruary 23, 1942 (age 77)
Mac Sweeney 1985–198914thSeptember 15, 1955 (age 63)
Albert Bustamante 1985–199323rdApril 8, 1935 (age 84)
Jim Chapman 1985–19971stMarch 8, 1945 (age 74)
Larry Combest 1985–200319thMarch 20, 1945 (age 74)
Dick Armey 1985–200326thJuly 7, 1940 (age 78)
Tom DeLay 1985–200622ndApril 8, 1947 (age 72)
Joe Barton 1985–20196thSeptember 15, 1949 (age 69)
Lamar Smith 1987–201921stNovember 19, 1947 (age 71)
Bill Sarpalius 1989–199513thJanuary 10, 1948 (age 71)
Craig Washington 1989–199518thOctober 12, 1941 (age 77)
Pete Geren 1989–199712thJanuary 29, 1952 (age 67)
Greg Laughlin 1989–199714thJanuary 21, 1942 (age 77)
Chet Edwards 1991–201111th
17th
November 24, 1951 (age 67)
Sam Johnson 1991–20193rdOctober 11, 1930 (age 88)
Henry Bonilla 1993–200723rdJanuary 2, 1954 (age 65)
Gene Green 1993–201929thOctober 17, 1947 (age 71)
Steve Stockman 1995–1997
2013-2015
9th
36th
November 14, 1956 (age 62)
Ken Bentsen Jr. 1995–200325thJune 3, 1959 (age 60)
Max Sandlin 1997–20051stSeptember 29, 1952 (age 66)
Jim Turner 1997–20052ndFebruary 6, 1946 (age 73)
Nick Lampson 1997–2005
2007-2009
9th
22nd
February 14, 1945 (age 74)
Ciro Rodriguez 1997-2005
2007–2011
28th
23rd
December 9, 1946 (age 72)
Silvestre Reyes 1997–201316thNovember 10, 1944 (age 74)
Rubén Hinojosa 1997–201715thAugust 20, 1940 (age 78)
Pete Sessions 1997–20195th (1997-2003)
32nd (2003-2019)
March 22, 1955 (age 64)
Charlie Gonzalez 1999–201320thMay 5, 1945 (age 74)
John Culberson 2001–20197thAugust 24, 1956 (age 62)
Chris Bell 2003–200525thNovember 23, 1959 (age 59)
Randy Neugebauer 2003–201719thDecember 24, 1949 (age 69)
Jeb Hensarling 2003–20195thMay 29, 1957 (age 62)
Ted Poe 2005–20192ndSeptember 10, 1948 (age 70)
Shelley Sekula-Gibbs 2006–200722ndJune 22, 1953 (age 65)
Quico Canseco 2011–201323rdJuly 30, 1949 (age 69)
Blake Farenthold 2011–201827thDecember 12, 1961 (age 57)
Pete Gallego 2013–201523rdDecember 2, 1961 (age 57)
Beto O'Rourke 2013–201916thSeptember 26, 1972 (age 46)

U.S. Senate Delegation

Current delegation
John Cornyn (cropped).jpg
Senior Senator John Cornyn
(R)
Ted Cruz official 116th portrait (cropped).jpg
Junior Senator Ted Cruz
(R)

Senate delegation timetable

Class 1 SenatorsCongressClass 2 Senators
Thomas J. Rusk (D) 29th (1845–1847) Sam Houston (D)
30th (1847–1849)
31st (1849–1851)
32nd (1851–1853)
33rd (1853–1855)
34th (1855–1857) Sam Houston (K-N)
35th (1857–1859)
James Pinckney Henderson (D)
Matthias Ward (D)
36th (1859–1861) John Hemphill (D)
Louis T. Wigfall (D)
American Civil War 37th (1861–1863) American Civil War
38th (1863–1865)
39th (1865–1867)
40th (1867–1869)
James W. Flanagan (R) 41st (1869–1871) Morgan C. Hamilton (R)
42nd (1871–1873)
43rd (1873–1875)
Samuel B. Maxey (D) 44th (1875–1877)
45th (1877–1879) Richard Coke (D)
46th (1879–1881)
47th (1881–1883)
48th (1883–1885)
49th (1885–1887)
John H. Reagan (D) 50th (1887–1889)
51st (1889–1891)
52nd (1891–1893)
Horace Chilton (D)
Roger Q. Mills (D)
53rd (1893–1895)
54th (1895–1897) Horace Chilton (D)
55th (1897–1899)
Charles A. Culberson (D) 56th (1899–1901)
57th (1901–1903) Joseph W. Bailey (D)
58th (1903–1905)
59th (1905–1907)
60th (1907–1909)
61st (1909–1911)
62nd (1911–1913)
Rienzi M. Johnston (D)
Morris Sheppard (D)
63rd (1913–1915)
64th (1915–1917)
65th (1917–1919)
66th (1919–1921)
67th (1921–1923)
Earle B. Mayfield (D) 68th (1923–1925)
69th (1925–1927)
70th (1927–1929)
Thomas T. Connally (D) 71st (1929–1931)
72nd (1931–1933)
73rd (1933–1935)
74th (1935–1937)
75th (1937–1939)
76th (1939–1941)
77th (1941–1943)
Andrew Jackson Houston (D)
Wilbert Lee O'Daniel (D)
78th (1943–1945)
79th (1945–1947)
80th (1947–1949)
81st (1949–1951) Lyndon Johnson (D)
82nd (1951–1953)
Price Daniel (D) 83rd (1953–1955)
84th (1955–1957)
85th (1957–1959)
William A. Blakley (D)
Ralph W. Yarborough (D)
86th (1959–1961)
87th (1961–1963) William A. Blakley (D)
John G. Tower (R)
88th (1963–1965)
89th (1965–1967)
90th (1967–1969)
91st (1969–1971)
Lloyd Bentsen (D) 92nd (1971–1973)
93rd (1973–1975)
94th (1975–1977)
95th (1977–1979)
96th (1979–1981)
97th (1981–1983)
98th (1983–1985)
99th (1985–1987) Phil Gramm (R)
100th (1987–1989)
101st (1989–1991)
102nd (1991–1993)
103rd (1993–1995)
Robert Krueger (D)
Kay Bailey Hutchison (R)
104th (1995–1997)
105th (1997–1999)
106th (1999–2001)
107th (2001–2003)
108th (2003–2005) John Cornyn (R)
109th (2005–2007)
110th (2007–2009)
111th (2009–2011)
112th (2011–2013)
Ted Cruz (R) 113th (2013–2015)
114th (2015–2017)
115th (2017–2019)
116th (2019-2021)

Living former senators

As of April 2018, there are three living former senators. The most recent Senator to die was Lloyd Bentsen (1971–1993) on May 23, 2006.

SenatorClassTerm of officeDate of birth (and age)
Phil Gramm 2January 3, 1985 – November 30, 2002July 9, 1942 (age 76)
Bob Krueger 1January 23, 1993 – June 14, 1993September 19, 1935 (age 83)
Kay Bailey Hutchison 1June 14, 1993 – January 3, 2013July 22, 1943 (age 75)

Key

Key to party colors and abbreviations for members of the U.S. Congress
American (Know Nothing) (K-N)
Anti-Jacksonian (Anti-J),
National Republican (NR)
Anti-Administration (Anti-Admin)
Anti-Masonic (Anti-M)
Conservative (Con)
Democratic (D)
Dixiecrat (Dix),
States' rights (SR)
Democratic-Republican (D-R)
Farmer–Labor (FL)
Federalist (F)
Free Soil (FS)
Free Silver (FSv)
Fusion (FU)
Greenback (GB)
Jacksonian (J)
Nonpartisan League (NPL)
Nullifier (N)
Opposition Northern (O)
Opposition Southern (O)
Populist (Pop)
Pro-Administration (Pro-Admin)
Progressive (Prog)
Prohibition (Proh)
Readjuster (Rea)
Republican (R)
Socialist (Soc)
Unionist (U)
Whig (W)
Independent ,
None,
or Unaffiliated

See also

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References

  1. "The national atlas". nationalatlas.gov. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved February 22, 2014.
  2. "Digital Boundary Definitions of United States Congressional Districts, 1789–2012" . Retrieved October 18, 2014.