1960 Republican National Convention

Last updated
1960 Republican National Convention
1960 presidential election
RP1960.png RV1960.png
Nominees
Nixon and Lodge
Convention
Date(s)July 25–28, 1960
City Chicago
Venue International Amphitheatre
Candidates
Presidential nominee Richard M. Nixon of California
Vice presidential nominee Henry C. Lodge Jr. of Massachusetts
  1956   ·  1964  
Highlights of 1960 Republican convention

The 1960 Republican National Convention was held in Chicago, Illinois, from July 25 to July 28, 1960, at the International Amphitheatre. It was the 14th and most recent time overall that Chicago hosted the Republican National Convention, more times than any other city.

Contents

The convention nominated Vice President Richard M. Nixon for president and former Senator Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. of Massachusetts for vice president.

The Presidency

By the time the Republican convention opened, Nixon had no opponents for the nomination. The highlight of the convention was the speech by U.S. Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona removing himself from the race, in which he called on conservatives to "take back" the party. Nixon won easily, earning 1,321 votes to 10 for Goldwater. [1] At the convention, Nixon promised that he would visit every state during his campaign. [2]

The Vice Presidency

After winning the presidential nomination, Nixon considered several candidates for the vice presidential nomination. Incumbent President Dwight D. Eisenhower strongly supported Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., the United States Ambassador to the United Nations. [3] Though Lodge was not viewed by Republicans as a charismatic speaker, his foreign policy experience made him an appealing candidate. [3]

Lodge was unpopular with the conservative wing of the party, who regarded him as a Northeastern moderate. [3] As a result of the conservatives' coolness toward Lodge, Nixon strongly considered conservative Minnesota Representative Walter Judd and U.S. Senator Thruston Morton of Kentucky, an establishment Republican who was more moderate than Judd but had a high profile as chairman of the Republican National Committee. [4]

Other candidates Nixon considered include:

After deciding on Lodge, Nixon participated in a closed session with party leaders, who concurred with his preference. [4] After the session, Nixon announced his choice publicly, and the convention ratified it.

General election

The Nixon-Lodge ticket lost the 1960 election to the Democratic ticket of John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson.

See also

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This article lists those who were potential candidates for the Republican nomination for Vice President of the United States in the 1960 election. After winning the Republican presidential nomination at the 1960 Republican National Convention, Vice President Richard Nixon needed to choose a running mate. President Dwight D. Eisenhower strongly supported UN Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. Though Lodge lacked charisma as a campaigner, his foreign policy experience and stature as ambassador made him an appealing candidate. However, Lodge was unpopular with the Republican right, who did not want a Northeastern moderate on the ticket. Nixon also strongly considered conservative Minnesota Representative Walter Judd and moderate Kentucky Senator Thruston Morton. After a closed session with Republican Party leaders, Nixon announced his choice of Lodge. The Republican convention ratified Nixon's choice of Lodge. The Nixon–Lodge ticket lost the 1960 election to the Democratic ticket of Kennedy–Johnson.

References

  1. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-07-19. Retrieved 2009-03-29.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. "Richard Nixon: Address Accepting the Presidential Nomination at the Republican National Convention in Chicago". www.presidency.ucsb.edu.
  3. 1 2 3 Donaldson, Gary (2007). The First Modern Campaign: Kennedy, Nixon, and the Election of 1960. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 90–91. ISBN   9780742548008 . Retrieved 6 October 2015.
  4. 1 2 Pietrusza, David (2008). 1960: LBJ Vs. JFK Vs. Nixon : the Epic Campaign that Forged Three Presidencies. Sterling Publishing Company. pp. 225–230. ISBN   9781402761140 . Retrieved 6 October 2015.
Preceded by
1956
San Francisco, California
Republican National Conventions Succeeded by
1964
Daly City, California