1948 Republican National Convention

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1948 Republican National Convention
1948 presidential election
RP1948.png RV1948.png
Nominees
Dewey and Warren
Convention
Date(s)June 21–25, 1948
City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Venue Convention Hall
Candidates
Presidential nominee Thomas E. Dewey of New York
Vice presidential nominee Earl Warren of California
  1944   ·  1952  

The 1948 Republican National Convention was held at the Municipal Auditorium, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from June 21 to 25, 1948.

Contents

New York Governor Thomas E. Dewey had paved the way to win the Republican presidential nomination in the primary elections, where he had beaten former Minnesota Governor Harold E. Stassen and World War II General Douglas MacArthur. In Philadelphia he was nominated on the third ballot over opposition from die-hard conservative Ohio Senator Robert A. Taft, the future "minister of peace" Stassen, Michigan Senator Arthur Vandenberg, and California Governor Earl Warren. In all Republican conventions since 1948, the nominee has been selected on the first ballot. Warren was nominated for vice president. The Republican ticket of Dewey and Warren went on to lose the general election to the Democratic ticket of Harry S. Truman and Alben W. Barkley. One of the decisive factors in convening both major party conventions in Philadelphia that year was that Philadelphia was hooked up to the coaxial cable, giving the ability for two of the three then-young television networks, NBC and CBS, to telecast for the first time live gavel-to-gavel coverage along the East Coast. Only a few minutes of kinescope film have survived of these historic, live television broadcasts. [1]

Platform

The party platform formally adopted at the convention included the following points:

Candidates before the convention

Balloting

The tally:
Ballot123
NY Governor Thomas E. Dewey 4345151094
OH Senator Robert A. Taft 2242740
Frm. MN Governor Harold Stassen 1571490
MI Senator and President pro tempore Arthur Vandenberg 62620
CA Governor Earl Warren 59570
House Speaker Joseph Martin 18100
General Douglas MacArthur 1170
Others127200

As of 2020, this was the last Republican Convention to go past the first ballot.

Vice Presidential nomination

Dewey had a long list of potential running mates, including his 1944 running mate, Senator John Bricker of Ohio, Representative Charles Halleck of Indiana, former Governor Harold Stassen of Minnesota, and California Governor Earl Warren.

Dewey chose Warren, who was subsequently nominated by acclaimation.

The Dewey–Warren ticket was the last to consist of two current or former state Governors until 2016, when former governors Gary Johnson and Bill Weld ran on the Libertarian Party ticket.

See also

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">1944 Republican Party vice presidential candidate selection</span>

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References

  1. Simmons, Amy V. (5 August 2016). "The first televised Democratic Convention, 70 years later: An unplanned delegate remembers". Philadelphia Sun. Retrieved 6 August 2016.
  2. "Republican Party Platform of 1948".
Preceded by
1944
Chicago, Illinois
Republican National Conventions Succeeded by
1952
Chicago, Illinois