United States Senate Select Committee on Ethics

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The U.S. Senate Select Committee on Ethics is a select committee of the United States Senate charged with dealing with matters related to senatorial ethics. It is also commonly referred to as the Senate Ethics Committee. Senate rules require the Ethics Committee to be evenly divided between the Democrats and the Republicans, no matter who controls the Senate, although the chairman always comes from the majority party. The leading committee member of the minority party is referred to as Vice Chairman rather than the more common Ranking Member.

Contents

History

The Senate Select Committee on Standards and Conduct was first convened in the 89th Congress (1965–66) and later replaced by the Senate Select Committee on Ethics in the 95th Congress (1977–78).

Membership

Pursuant to Senate Rule 25, the committee is limited to six members, and is equally divided between Democrats and Republicans. This effectively means that either party can veto any action taken by the committee. [1]

Current membership

MajorityMinority

Previous Congresses

110th Congress

MajorityMinority

111th Congress

MajorityMinority

112th Congress

MajorityMinority

Source: 2011  Congressional Record, Vol. 157, Page  S557

113th Congress

MajorityMinority

Source: 2011  Congressional Record, Vol. 157, Page  S557

114th Congress

MajorityMinority

Source: 2013  Congressional Record, Vol. 159, Page  S296

115th Congress

Members of the Senate Select Committee on Ethics, 115th Congress [2]

MajorityMinority

Chairs

List of chairs of the Senate Select Committee on Ethics

ChairPartyStateTerm
John C. Stennis DMississippi1965–1975
Howard Cannon DNevada1975–1977
Adlai Stevenson III DIllinois1977–1980
Howell Heflin DAlabama1980–1981
Malcolm Wallop RWyoming1981–1983
Ted Stevens RAlaska1983–1985
Warren Rudman RNew Hampshire1985–1987
Howell Heflin DAlabama1987–1992
Terry Sanford DNorth Carolina1992–1993
Richard Bryan DNevada1993–1995
Mitch McConnell RKentucky1995–1997
Bob Smith RNew Hampshire1997–1999
Pat Roberts RKansas1999–2001 (ended January 3)
Vacant 2001 (January 3–20)
Pat Roberts RKansas2001 (January 20 – June 6)
Harry Reid DNevada2001–2003 (started June 6, 2001)
George Voinovich ROhio2003–2007
Barbara Boxer DCalifornia2007–2015
Johnny Isakson RGeorgia2015–2019
James Lankford ROklahoma2019–2021

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References

  1. "U.S. Senate: Select Committee on Ethics". www.senate.gov. Retrieved January 8, 2017.
  2. Straus, Jacob R. (January 31, 2017). "Appendices A and B". Senate Select Committee on Ethics: A Brief History of Its Evolution and Jurisdiction (PDF) (Report). Congressional Research Service. Retrieved October 12, 2017.