List of federal agencies in the United States

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Legislative definitions of a federal agency are varied, and even contradictory. The official United States Government Manual offers no definition. [1] [2] While the Administrative Procedure Act definition of "agency" applies to most executive branch agencies, Congress may define an agency however it chooses in enabling legislation, and subsequent litigation, often involving the Freedom of Information Act and the Government in the Sunshine Act. These further cloud attempts to enumerate a list of agencies. [3] [4]

Contents

The executive branch of the federal government includes the Executive Office of the President and the United States federal executive departments (whose secretaries belong to the Cabinet). Employees of the majority of these agencies are considered civil servants.

The majority of the independent agencies of the United States government are also classified as executive agencies (they are independent in that they are not subordinated under a Cabinet position). There are a small number of independent agencies that are not considered part of the executive branch, such as the Library of Congress and Congressional Budget Office, administered directly by Congress and thus are legislative branch agencies.

United States Congress

Seal of the United States Congress.svg

The U.S. Congress is the bicameral legislature of the United States government, and is made up of two chambers: United States Senate (the upper chamber), and United States House of Representatives (The lower chamber). Together, the two chambers exercise authority over the following legislative agencies:

Congress also maintains special administrative agencies like:

The legislature is also in charge of the Library of Congress (LOC). A national library dedicated to national records and administers various programs, agencies, and services including:

Federal judiciary of the United States

Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg

Agencies within the judicial branch:

Specialty courts

Executive Office of the President

Seal of the President of the United States.svg

The President of the United States is the chief executive of the Federal Government. He is in charge of executing federal laws and approving, or vetoing, new legislation passed by Congress. The President resides in the Executive Residence (EXR) maintained by the Office of Administration (OA).

To effectively run the country's affairs, the President also maintains councils regarding various issues, including:

White House Office

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)

US-DeptOfAgriculture-Seal2.svg

Office of the Secretary of Agriculture

  • Office of the Assistant Secretary for Congressional Relations
  • Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
  • Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration
  • Departmental Administration
    • Office of Contracting and Procurement (OCP)
    • Office of Human Resources Management (OHRM)
    • Office of Operations (OO)
    • Office of Property and Fleet Management (OPFM)
    • Office of Safety, Security, and Protection (OSSP)
    • Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU)
    • Office of the Executive Secretariat (OES)
  • Agriculture Buildings and Facilities (AgBF)
  • Hazardous Materials Management (HMM)
  • Office of Budget and Program Analysis (OBPA)
  • Office of Communications (OC)
  • Office of Ethics (OE)
  • Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA)
  • Office of Homeland Security (OHS)
  • Office of Inspector General (OIG)
  • Office of Partnerships and Public Engagement (OPPE)
    • Office of Tribal Relations (OTR)
    • Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships (CFBNP)
  • Office of the Chief Economist (OCE)
  • Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OFCO)
  • Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO)
  • Office of the General Counsel (OGC)
    • Office of Information Affairs

Under Secretary of Agriculture for Farm Production and Conservation (FPAC)

Under Secretary of Agriculture for Food, Nutrition, and Consumer Services (FNCS)

Under Secretary of Agriculture for Food Safety

Under Secretary of Agriculture for Marketing and Regulatory Programs (MRP)

Under Secretary of Agriculture for Natural Resources and Environment (NRE)

Under Secretary of Agriculture for Research, Education, and Economics (REE)

Office of the Under Secretary for Rural Development (RD)

Office of the Under Secretary for Trade and Foreign Agricultural Affairs (TFAA)

United States Department of Commerce

US-DeptOfCommerce-Seal.svg

Office of the Secretary (OS)

Under Secretary of Commerce for Industry and Security/Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS)

  • Office of the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration
    • Operating Committee for Export Policy (OC)
    • Office of Strategic Industries and Economic Security
    • Office of Nonproliferation and Treaty Compliance
    • Office of National Security and Technology Transfer Controls
    • Office of Exporter Services
    • Office of Technology Evaluation
  • Office of Export Enforcement (OEE)

Under Secretary of Commerce for Economic Affairs (OUS/EA)

Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property/United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO)
Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade/International Trade Administration (ITA)
Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards and Technology

United States Department of Defense (DOD)

United States Department of Defense Seal.svg

Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD)

Defense agencies

National intelligence agencies

Defense field activities

Universities and research institutes

Unified combatant commands

Joint agencies

Department of the Army

Office of the Secretary of the Army

U.S. Army Commands

U.S. Army Direct Reporting Units

U.S. Army Field Operating Agencies

Department of the Navy

Office of the Secretary of the Navy

U..S. Navy Functional Operating Forces

Shore Establishment and Activities, Echelon II
U.S. Navy Field Support Activities

United States Marine Corps (USMC)

Department of the Air Force

Office of the Secretary of the Air Force

U.S. Air Force Major Commands

Reserve and Auxiliary Components

Direct Reporting Units

Field Operating Agencies

United States Department of Education

Seal of the United States Department of Education.svg

Office of the Secretary of Education (OSE)

  • Office of Communications and Outreach
  • Office of Finance and Operations
  • Office of Inspector General
  • Office of the General Counsel
  • Office of Legislation and Congressional Affairs
  • Office for Civil Rights
  • Office of Educational Technology
  • Office of the Chief Information Officer
  • Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development
  • Budget Service
  • Risk Management Service

Office of Deputy Secretary of Education (ODSE)

Institute of Education Sciences (IES)

  • National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance
  • National Center for Education Research
  • National Center for Education Statistics
  • National Center for Special Education Research
  • National Board for Education Sciences

Office of the Under Secretary (OUS)

White House initiatives and operating commissions

Advisory bodies

Federally-aided corporations

United States Department of Energy

US-DeptOfEnergy-Seal.svg

United States Department of Health and Human Services

US-DeptOfHHS-Seal.svg

United States Department of Homeland Security

Seal of the United States Department of Homeland Security.svg

Agencies and offices

Offices and councils

Management

National protection and programs

Science and technology

Portfolios

Divisions

Offices and institutes

United States Department of Housing and Urban Development

US-DeptOfHUD-Seal.svg

Agencies

Offices

Corporation

United States Department of the Interior (DOI)

US-DeptOfTheInterior-Seal.svg

United States Department of Justice

US-DeptOfJustice-Seal.svg

United States Department of Labor (DOL)

US-DeptOfLabor-Seal.svg

Office of the Secretary (OSEC)

  • Executive Secretary
  • Centers for Faith and Opportunity Initiative
  • Office of the Ombudsman for the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Programs
  • Office of Public Liaison

Offices under the Deputy Secretary of Labor

  • Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management
  • Office of the Assistant Secretary for Policy
  • Office of the Chief Financial Officer
  • Office of the Chief Information Officer
  • Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs
  • Office of Emergency Management
  • Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs
  • Office of Labor-Management Standards
  • Office of Public Affairs
  • Office of Disability Employment Policy
  • Office of the Solicitor
  • Office of Worker's Compensation Program

Administrations

Boards under the Office of Administrative Law Judges

Bureaus

Miscellaneous

United States Department of State (DOS)

US Department of State official seal.svg

Agencies, bureaus, and offices

Reporting to the Secretary

Reporting to the Deputy Secretary for Management and Resources

  • Office of U.S. Foreign Assistance Resources
  • Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization
  • Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review (QDDR) Office

Reporting to the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security

Reporting to the Under Secretary for Human Rights, Civilian Security, and Democracy

Reporting to the Under Secretary for Environment, Energy, and Economic Growth

Reporting to the Under Secretary for Management

Reporting to the Under Secretary for Political Affairs

Reporting to the Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs

Permanent diplomatic missions

United States Department of Transportation

US-DeptOfTransportation-Seal.svg

Operating administrations

United States Department of the Treasury

US-DeptOfTheTreasury-Seal.svg

Departmental offices [9]

Bureaus [10]

United States Department of Veterans Affairs

Seal of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.svg

Office of the Secretary of Veterans Affairs

Agencies

Independent agencies and government-owned corporations

Established under United States Constitution Article I, Section 4

Elections

Established under Article I, Section 8

Administrative agencies

Civil service agencies

Commerce regulatory agencies

Government commissions, committees, and consortium

Education and broadcasting agencies

Energy and science agencies

Foreign investment agencies

Interior agencies

Labor agencies

Monetary and financial agencies

Postal agencies

Retirement agencies

Federal property and seat of government agencies

Transportation agencies

Volunteerism agencies

Authority under Article II, Section 1

Defense and security agencies

Authority under Amendment XIV

Civil rights agencies

Other agencies and corporations

Joint programs and interagency agencies

Special Inspector General Office

Quasi-official agencies

Arts & cultural agencies

Museum agencies

Commerce & technology agencies

Defense & diplomacy agencies

Human service & community development agencies

Interior agencies

Law & justice agencies

See also

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References

Notes

  1. Fischer 2011, pp. 1–2.
  2. Federal Register 2013.
  3. Lewis & Selin 2013, pp. 13–14.
  4. Kamensky 2013.
  5. "Program Offices". Department of Energy. Retrieved June 7, 2019.
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 "Our Administrations". US Department of Transportation. 2012-03-01. Retrieved 2017-12-17.
  7. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 "Office of the Secretary". US Department of Transportation. 2012-03-01. Retrieved 2017-12-17.
  8. "Governance and Oversight". U.S. Merchant Marine Academy. 2013-01-27. Retrieved 2017-12-17.
  9. "IBM Cognos software". www.fedscope.opm.gov. Retrieved 2017-12-17.
  10. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 "Bureaus". www.treasury.gov. Retrieved 2017-12-17.

Bibliography