Elections in Colorado

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Electoral system

Party system

A political organization is a political party when its candidate for governor receives at least 10 percent of the vote in the latest general election. [1] Party members choose their party's nominees for the general election in a primary election. [2] Party members also elect the county central committee members at the primary election. [3] Colorado uses an open primary system, whereby party members and unaffiliated voters may vote in the party's primary. [4] [5] [6]

Contents

There are three distinct aspects of party organization: the committee system, the designating assembly system, and the convention system. [3] The systems operate with respect to public offices for the state, counties, US congressional districts, state senatorial districts, state representative districts, and state judicial districts. (Judicial district elections only concern the district attorney; [7] district court and county court judges are nominated by a judicial nominating commission of the judicial district. [8] )

To be designated to contest the party's nomination at a primary election, a candidate must receive at least 30 percent of the delegates' votes at a party assembly. [20] Candidates may also petition party members to contest the primary election, with at least 20 percent of the party members (of those registered within that political subdivision) for offices of or within a county, 30 percent for districts larger than a county, and 2 percent for statewide offices. [21] [7]

Election procedure

A combination of local caucuses, primaries and general elections determines the top state offices (Governor, Secretary of State and Attorney General), as well as U.S. and state legislative races. Presidential races are decided by primary and general elections, with no caucuses. Legislation passed in 2016 instituted open primaries beginning with the 2018 races, and eliminated caucuses for presidential races starting in 2020. [6] [22]

Electoral history

See also

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Colorado Caucus

The Colorado Caucus is the electoral process used in Colorado to appoint candidates for certain political offices and start the process of electing new leaders for political party leadership. It takes the form of a series of precinct caucuses, meetings of registered electors within a precinct who are members of a particular major political party. The purpose of precinct caucuses is to elect precinct committee persons and delegates to county assemblies, including those that elect delegates to the presidential nominating conventions.

2020 Iowa Democratic presidential caucuses Democratic caucus in the 2020 election

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2020 Colorado Democratic presidential primary

The 2020 Colorado Democratic presidential primary took place in Colorado, United States, on March 3, 2020, as one of 14 contests scheduled on Super Tuesday in the Democratic Party primaries for the 2020 presidential election. It followed the South Carolina primary the weekend before. The Colorado primary is a semi-closed primary. It awards 80 delegates towards the 2020 Democratic National Convention, of which 67 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the primary. Bernie Sanders was declared the winner of the primary by major news outlets.

2020 Washington Democratic presidential primary Selection of the Democratic Party nominee for President of the United States in 2020 in Washington (US)

The 2020 Washington Democratic presidential primary took place on Tuesday, March 10, 2020, in the U.S. state of Washington as one of several states voting the week after Super Tuesday in the Democratic Party presidential primaries for the 2020 presidential election. The Washington primary is an semi-open primary. The state awards 107 delegates to the 2020 Democratic National Convention, of which 89 are pledged delegates allocated according to the results of the primary.

This article contains the results of the 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries and caucuses, the processes by which the Democratic Party selects delegates to attend the 2020 Democratic National Convention from August 17–20, 2020. The series of primaries, caucuses, and state conventions culminated in the national convention, where the delegates cast their votes to formally select a candidate. A simple majority (1,990) of the total delegate votes (3,979) is required to become the nominee.

References

Citations

  1. Lorch 1991, p. 128.
  2. Lorch 1991, p. 125.
  3. 1 2 Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 167.
  4. Lorch 1991, p. 127.
  5. 1 2 Cronin & Loevy 1993, p. 133.
  6. 1 2 3 Bianchi, Chris (2018-02-19). "Caucus? Primary? A Voters' Guide to Colorado's Elections". Westword. Retrieved 2018-05-07.
  7. 1 2 Cronin & Loevy 1993, p. 136.
  8. Cronin & Loevy 1993, pp. 229-231.
  9. Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 168.
  10. 1 2 Cronin & Loevy 1993, pp. 132-134.
  11. 1 2 3 Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 170.
  12. 1 2 Cronin & Loevy 1993, pp. 136-137.
  13. 1 2 3 Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 171.
  14. Martin & Gomez 1976, pp. 169-171.
  15. Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 175.
  16. 1 2 Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 173.
  17. 1 2 Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 169.
  18. Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 174.
  19. Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 172.
  20. Cronin & Loevy 1993, pp. 131-132.
  21. Lorch 1991, pp. 130-131.
  22. "Primary Elections FAQs". Colorado Secretary of State. State of Colorado. Retrieved 5 September 2020.

Sources