Cheyenne County, Colorado

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Cheyenne County
Cheyenne County Courthouse July 2020.jpg
Cheyenne County Colorado Courthouse
Map of Colorado highlighting Cheyenne County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Colorado
Colorado in United States.svg
Colorado's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 38°49′N102°35′W / 38.82°N 102.59°W / 38.82; -102.59
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Colorado.svg  Colorado
FoundedMarch 25, 1889
Named for The Cheyenne Nation
Seat Cheyenne Wells
Largest townCheyenne Wells
Area
  Total1,781 sq mi (4,610 km2)
  Land1,778 sq mi (4,600 km2)
  Water3.2 sq mi (8 km2)  0.2%%
Population
  Estimate 
(2019)
1,831 [1]
  Density1.0/sq mi (0.4/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain)
  Summer (DST) UTC−6 (MDT)
Congressional district 4th
Website www.co.cheyenne.co.us

Cheyenne County is the sixth-least densely populated of the 64 counties of the U.S. state of Colorado. The county population was 1,836 at 2010 census. [2] The county seat is Cheyenne Wells. [3]

Contents

History

Cheyenne County was created with its present borders by the Colorado State Legislature on March 25, 1889, out of portions of northeastern Bent County and southeastern Elbert County. It was named after the Cheyenne Indians who occupied eastern Colorado.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,781 square miles (4,610 km2), of which 1,778 square miles (4,600 km2) is land and 3.2 square miles (8.3 km2) (0.2%) is water. [4]

The drainage basins in Cheyenne County include Bellyache, Big Timber, East and Middle Fork Big Spring, Eureka, Goose, Ladder, Little Spring, Pass, Rock, Sand, Turtle, White Woman, Wild Horse and Willow Creeks, as well as the Smoky Hill River. [5] The Smoky Hill drains into the Republican River in Kansas. The creeks in the northern and eastern part of the county drain to the Republican or Smoky Hill Rivers; those in the central and southeastern part of the county drain ultimately to the Arkansas River. All of the creeks in Cheyenne County are generally dry with some flow when drawing snowmelt or rainfall. There are four summits in Cheyenne County: Agate Mound (4,457 ft.), Eureka Hill (4,700 ft.), Landsman Hill (4,695 ft.), and Twin Buttes (4,621 ft.) [6] The highest point in the county is in the extreme northwest corner of the county on the Bledsoe Ranch (5,255 ft.) [7]

Adjacent counties

Major Highways

Antipode

Cheyenne County is home of the Antipode of Île Saint-Paul making it one of the few places in the continental United States with a non-oceanic antipode. [8] [9]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1890 534
1900 501−6.2%
1910 3,687635.9%
1920 3,7461.6%
1930 3,723−0.6%
1940 2,964−20.4%
1950 3,45316.5%
1960 2,789−19.2%
1970 2,396−14.1%
1980 2,153−10.1%
1990 2,39711.3%
2000 2,231−6.9%
2010 1,836−17.7%
2019 (est.)1,831 [10] −0.3%
U.S. Decennial Census [11]
1790-1960 [12] 1900-1990 [13]
1990-2000 [14] 2010-2015 [2]

As of the census [15] of 2000, there were 2,231 people, 880 households, and 602 families residing in the county. The population density was 1 people per square mile (0/km2). There were 1,105 housing units at an average density of 1 per square mile (0/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 92.87% White, 0.49% Black or African American, 0.76% Native American, 0.13% Asian, 5.11% from other races, and 0.63% from two or more races. 8.11% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 880 households, out of which 34.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.30% were married couples living together, 5.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.50% were non-families. 29.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 28.80% under the age of 18, 7.10% from 18 to 24, 26.20% from 25 to 44, 21.30% from 45 to 64, and 16.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 100.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $37,054, and the median income for a family was $44,394. Males had a median income of $32,250 versus $19,286 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,850. About 8.70% of families and 11.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.90% of those under age 18 and 10.90% of those age 65 or over.

Communities

Cheyenne County, Colorado Map of Cheyenne County, Colorado.png
Cheyenne County, Colorado

Towns

Unincorporated communities

Politics

Cheyenne County vote by party in presidential elections [16]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2020 87.4%99311.5% 1311.1% 12
2016 83.9%92512.0% 1324.1% 45
2012 81.3%88915.7% 1722.9% 32
2008 80.1%89017.8% 1982.1% 23
2004 81.4%92317.5% 1981.2% 13
2000 79.0%95717.2% 2093.8% 46
1996 62.8%73927.9% 3289.3% 109
1992 50.7%61524.8% 30124.4% 296
1988 64.1%76033.6% 3992.3% 27
1984 73.2%89225.2% 3071.6% 19
1980 65.9%81626.0% 3228.1% 101
1976 48.2% 61049.3%6252.5% 32
1972 63.4%81531.1% 4005.5% 71
1968 55.7%66432.9% 39211.4% 136
1964 42.5% 54557.3%7350.2% 3
1960 65.7%80634.2% 4190.2% 2
1956 61.7%82038.2% 5070.2% 2
1952 66.0%1,00433.8% 5150.2% 3
1948 47.4% 65751.4%7131.2% 16
1944 60.7%92339.1% 5940.3% 4
1940 54.4%91545.1% 7580.5% 8
1936 44.9% 76752.8%9032.3% 40
1932 39.4% 74655.0%1,0425.6% 105
1928 63.9%94533.8% 5002.4% 35
1924 55.7%87515.0% 23629.3% 460
1920 64.6%84027.5% 3587.9% 103
1916 38.4% 55855.2%8026.5% 94
1912 17.7% 23737.8%50744.6% 598 [lower-alpha 1]

Since the 1920s, Cheyenne County has mostly supported Republican candidates in presidential elections. In the 25 presidential elections since 1920, the Democratic presidential candidates have carried the county only five times, none have broken 60% of the vote, and only Lyndon Johnson in 1964, and Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1932 won the county by a double-digit margin. By contrast, the Republican nominees have carried the county 20 times, including the last ten in a row, with all except Wendell Wilkie in 1940 winning by at least a double-digit margin. The four most recent GOP presidential candidates George W. Bush, John McCain, Mitt Romney, and Donald Trump all carried Cheyenne county with over 80% of the vote.

Historic Trails

Historic Sites

See also

Notes

  1. The leading "other" candidate, Progressive Theodore Roosevelt, received 414 votes, while Socialist candidate Eugene Debs received 148 votes, Prohibition candidate Eugene Chafin received 35 votes, and Socialist Labor candidate Arthur Reimer received 1 vote.

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References

  1. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. August 15, 2017. Archived from the original on August 6, 2017. Retrieved August 15, 2017.
  2. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2014.
  3. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 9, 2015. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  5. Cheyenne County Physical Features. Colorado Home Town Locator. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved November 16, 2012.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. Cheyenne County: PlaceNames.com "Archived copy". Archived from the original on June 10, 2013. Retrieved November 17, 2012.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  7. Colorado Peak Statistics. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved November 17, 2012.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  8. "Antipodes Map (AKA Tunnel Map)". www.findlatitudeandlongitude.com. Archived from the original on February 14, 2018. Retrieved May 3, 2018.
  9. "United States Antipodes". www.weathergraphics.com. Archived from the original on January 4, 2018. Retrieved May 3, 2018.
  10. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved December 3, 2019.
  11. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 7, 2014.
  12. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved June 7, 2014.
  13. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 31, 2014. Retrieved June 7, 2014.
  14. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 18, 2014. Retrieved June 7, 2014.
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  16. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Archived from the original on June 4, 2011. Retrieved May 26, 2017.
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  18. Historic Sites in Cheyenne County. COGenWeb.http://cogenweb.com/cheyenne/cheyhist.htm

Coordinates: 38°49′N102°35′W / 38.82°N 102.59°W / 38.82; -102.59