Clear Creek County, Colorado

Last updated

Clear Creek County
DSCN2140 georgetownalpinehose e 600.jpg
Map of Colorado highlighting Clear Creek County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Colorado
Colorado in United States.svg
Colorado's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 39°41′N105°38′W / 39.69°N 105.64°W / 39.69; -105.64
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Colorado.svg  Colorado
FoundedNovember 1, 1861
Named for Clear Creek
Seat Georgetown
Largest city Idaho Springs
Area
  Total396 sq mi (1,030 km2)
  Land395 sq mi (1,020 km2)
  Water1.3 sq mi (3 km2)  0.3%%
Population
  Estimate 
(2019)
9,700 [1]
  Density23/sq mi (9/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain)
  Summer (DST) UTC−6 (MDT)
Congressional district 2nd
Website co.clear-creek.co.us

Clear Creek County is a county located in the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,088. [2] The county seat is Georgetown. [3]

Contents

Clear Creek County is part of the Denver metropolitan area.

History

Clear Creek, ca. 1870 The forks of creek, Clear Creek (NYPL b11707543-G90F028 066ZF).tiff
Clear Creek, ca. 1870
Crystalline gold specimen from the Dixie mine, Lamartine District, SW of Idaho Springs, Colorado. Size: 1.8 x 0.9 x 0.2 cm. Gold-231683.jpg
Crystalline gold specimen from the Dixie mine, Lamartine District, SW of Idaho Springs, Colorado. Size: 1.8 x 0.9 x 0.2 cm.

Clear Creek County was one of the original 17 counties created by the Colorado legislature on 1 November 1861, and is one of only two counties (along with Gilpin) to have persisted with its original boundaries unchanged. It was named after Clear Creek, which runs down from the continental divide through the county. Idaho Springs was originally designated the county seat, but the county government was moved to Georgetown in 1867.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 396 square miles (1,030 km2), of which 395 square miles (1,020 km2) is land and 1.3 square miles (3.4 km2) (0.3%) is water. [5]

Adjacent counties

Major highways

National protected areas

Scenic trails and byways

Politics

Clear Creek County tends to be somewhat divided between Republicans and Democrats. In the 2012 election, Barack Obama won over Mitt Romney 54% to 42%.

Presidential elections results
Clear Creek County vote
by party in presidential elections
[6]
Year Republican Democratic Others
2020 42.1% 2,75455.0%3,6042.9% 190
2016 43.9% 2,57546.5%2,7299.6% 562
2012 42.3% 2,43054.3%3,1193.4% 194
2008 39.9% 2,30057.8%3,3322.3% 135
2004 44.9% 2,52253.3%2,9891.8% 102
2000 45.6%2,24744.4% 2,1889.9% 489
1996 42.0% 1,74644.8%1,86313.2% 551
1992 30.4% 1,35639.1%1,74430.5% 1,360
1988 50.1%1,82046.8% 1,6983.1% 114
1984 65.3%2,15133.1% 1,0891.6% 52
1980 56.2%1,78426.4% 83717.4% 552
1976 55.4%1,47740.1% 1,0694.6% 122
1972 62.2%1,55732.6% 8155.2% 130
1968 52.7%1,01137.5% 7199.8% 188
1964 38.3% 67661.5%1,0860.3% 5
1960 58.4%96441.7% 6880.0% 0
1956 64.9%97334.7% 5200.5% 7
1952 67.7%1,14531.9% 5400.4% 6
1948 48.7% 81050.2%8361.1% 18
1944 55.3%79544.2% 6360.5% 7
1940 44.2% 1,01855.6%1,2810.3% 7
1936 34.7% 72064.6%1,3400.8% 16
1932 38.2% 59760.0%9391.8% 28
1928 61.1%79037.2% 4811.8% 23
1924 61.9%72224.3% 28413.8% 161
1920 58.3%76539.5% 5182.2% 29
1916 26.4% 47471.7%1,2892.0% 36
1912 23.8% 46959.3%1,16616.9% 333

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1870 1,596
1880 7,823390.2%
1890 7,184−8.2%
1900 7,082−1.4%
1910 5,001−29.4%
1920 2,891−42.2%
1930 2,155−25.5%
1940 3,78475.6%
1950 3,289−13.1%
1960 2,793−15.1%
1970 4,81972.5%
1980 7,30851.6%
1990 7,6194.3%
2000 9,32222.4%
2010 9,088−2.5%
2019 (est.)9,700 [7] 6.7%
U.S. Decennial Census [8]
1790-1960 [9] 1900-1990 [10]
1990-2000 [11] 2010-2015 [2]

At the 2000 census there were 9,322 people, 4,019 households, and 2,608 families living in the county. The population density was 24 people per square mile (9/km2). There were 5,128 housing units at an average density of 13 per square mile (5/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 96.37% White, 0.28% Black or African American, 0.73% Native American, 0.36% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.02% from other races, and 1.20% from two or more races. 3.87% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. [12] Of the 4,019 households 28.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.60% were married couples living together, 6.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.10% were non-families. 27.20% of households were one person and 4.30% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 2.81.

The age distribution was 22.60% under the age of 18, 5.60% from 18 to 24, 32.60% from 25 to 44, 32.20% from 45 to 64, and 7.10% 65 or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 108.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 110.20 males.

The median household income was $50,997 and the median family income was $61,400. Males had a median income of $41,667 versus $30,757 for females. The per capita income for the county was $28,160. About 3.00% of families and 5.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.80% of those under age 18 and 5.60% of those age 65 or over.

Communities

Clear Creek County, Colorado Map of Clear Creek County, Colorado.png
Clear Creek County, Colorado

City

Towns

Census-designated places

Ghost towns

Historic areas

Ski areas

See also

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References

  1. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. August 15, 2017. Retrieved August 15, 2017.
  2. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 8, 2011. Retrieved January 25, 2014.
  3. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. Lamartine Mining District at Mindat.org
  5. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  6. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  7. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved December 3, 2019.
  8. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 7, 2014.
  9. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 7, 2014.
  10. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 7, 2014.
  11. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 7, 2014.
  12. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved May 14, 2011.

Coordinates: 39°41′N105°38′W / 39.69°N 105.64°W / 39.69; -105.64