Teller County, Colorado

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Teller County
Teller County Colorado Courthouse 11.jpg
Teller County Court House in Cripple Creek
TellerCountyColoradoSeal.png
Seal
Map of Colorado highlighting Teller County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Colorado
Colorado in United States.svg
Colorado's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 38°53′N105°09′W / 38.88°N 105.15°W / 38.88; -105.15
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Colorado.svg  Colorado
FoundedMarch 23, 1899
Named for Henry M. Teller
Seat Cripple Creek
Largest city Woodland Park
Area
  Total559 sq mi (1,450 km2)
  Land557 sq mi (1,440 km2)
  Water1.9 sq mi (5 km2)  0.3%%
Population
  Estimate 
(2019)
25,388
  Density42/sq mi (16/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain)
  Summer (DST) UTC−6 (MDT)
Congressional district 5th
Website www.co.teller.co.us

Teller County is a county located in the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2010 census, the population was 23,350. [1] The county seat is Cripple Creek, [2] and the most populous city is Woodland Park.

Contents

Teller County is included in the Colorado Springs, CO Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History

A few years after gold was discovered in Cripple Creek, political differences between area miners and mine owners, many of whom lived in Colorado Springs, resulted in the division of El Paso County. [3] Created in 1899, Teller County was carved from the western slope of Pikes Peak, and was named after United States Senator Henry M. Teller. Within five years of its formation, Teller County became the scene of a dramatic labor struggle called the Colorado Labor Wars.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 559 square miles (1,450 km2), of which 557 square miles (1,440 km2) is land and 1.9 square miles (4.9 km2) (0.3%) is water. [4]

Adjacent counties

Major Highways

National protected areas

State protected area

Trails and byways

Historic places

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1900 29,002
1910 14,351−50.5%
1920 6,696−53.3%
1930 4,141−38.2%
1940 6,46356.1%
1950 2,754−57.4%
1960 2,495−9.4%
1970 3,31632.9%
1980 8,034142.3%
1990 12,46855.2%
2000 20,55564.9%
2010 23,35013.6%
2019 (est.)25,388 [5] 8.7%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
1790-1960 [7] 1900-1990 [8]
1990-2000 [9] 2010-2015 [1]

At the 2000 census there were 20,555 people in 7,993 households, including 5,922 families, in the county. The population density was 37 people per square mile (14/km2). There were 10,362 housing units at an average density of 19 per square mile (7/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 94.92% White, 0.55% Black or African American, 0.97% Native American, 0.58% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 0.90% from other races, and 2.00% from two or more races. 3.49% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. [10] Of the 7,993 households 33.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.20% were married couples living together, 6.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.90% were non-families. 19.60% of households were one person and 4.00% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 2.94.

The age distribution was 25.90% under the age of 18, 5.60% from 18 to 24, 31.20% from 25 to 44, 29.80% from 45 to 64, and 7.50% 65 or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 102.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $50,165, and the median family income was $57,071. Males had a median income of $37,194 versus $26,934 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,412. About 3.40% of families and 5.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.90% of those under age 18 and 4.20% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

Presidential elections results
Teller County vote
by party in presidential elections
[11]
Year Republican Democratic Others
2020 66.4%11,24131.2% 5,2782.5% 420
2016 67.5%9,74524.9% 3,6037.6% 1,096
2012 64.6%8,70232.2% 4,3333.3% 438
2008 63.1%8,14635.0% 4,5131.9% 247
2004 68.4%8,09430.0% 3,5561.6% 192
2000 65.8%6,47727.9% 2,7506.3% 620
1996 57.9%4,45830.1% 2,31212.0% 925
1992 44.1%3,05027.1% 1,87328.8% 1,991
1988 68.4%3,76030.1% 1,6561.5% 84
1984 75.8%3,46022.9% 1,0431.3% 59
1980 66.3%2,45721.6% 80212.1% 448
1976 55.9%1,41039.1% 9865.0% 125
1972 70.5%1,44026.2% 5353.4% 69
1968 52.4%72229.3% 40318.4% 253
1964 45.7% 57754.2%6850.2% 2
1960 53.6%72346.1% 6220.3% 4
1956 66.4%97733.6% 4940.0% 0
1952 63.9%1,04235.1% 5721.0% 17
1948 48.4% 74850.4%7791.3% 20
1944 50.2%82949.0% 8080.8% 13
1940 37.6% 1,26861.8%2,0840.6% 20
1936 27.9% 94069.7%2,3492.3% 79
1932 30.2% 75261.6%1,5348.2% 203
1928 52.0%1,18445.6% 1,0372.4% 54
1924 48.8%1,28322.5% 59228.7% 755
1920 57.9%1,55237.7% 1,0104.4% 119
1916 31.0% 1,69364.4%3,5154.6% 253
1912 11.6% 67652.1%3,02736.3% 2,106

Communities

Cities

Town

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

See also

Related Research Articles

Cripple Creek, Colorado Statutory City in Colorado, United States

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Woodland Park, Colorado Home Rule Municipality in Colorado, United States

The City of Woodland Park is the Home Rule Municipality that is the most populous municipality in Teller County, Colorado, United States. Woodland Park is a part of the Colorado Springs, CO Metropolitan Statistical Area. Many residents in this bedroom community, which is surrounded by the one-million acre (4,000 km2) Pike National Forest, make the 17-mile (27 km) commute to Colorado Springs. Ute Pass lies 12 miles (19 km) to the west of Woodland Park on US 24. The population was 7200 at the 2010 census.

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References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 11, 2014.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. Elizabeth Jameson, All That GlittersClass, Conflict, and Community in Cripple Creek, 1998, page 168.
  4. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  5. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved December 12, 2019.
  6. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 11, 2014.
  7. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 11, 2014.
  8. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 11, 2014.
  9. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 11, 2014.
  10. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  11. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 26, 2017.

Coordinates: 38°53′N105°09′W / 38.88°N 105.15°W / 38.88; -105.15