Baca County, Colorado

Last updated

Baca County
Baca County Courthouse July 2020.jpg
The Baca County Courthouse in Springfield.
Map of Colorado highlighting Baca County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Colorado
Colorado in United States.svg
Colorado's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 37°19′N102°34′W / 37.32°N 102.56°W / 37.32; -102.56
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Colorado.svg  Colorado
FoundedApril 16, 1889
Named for Felipe Baca
Seat Springfield
Largest townSpringfield
Area
  Total2,557 sq mi (6,620 km2)
  Land2,555 sq mi (6,620 km2)
  Water2.4 sq mi (6 km2)  0.09%%
Population
 (2010)
  Total3,788 [1]
  Density1.5/sq mi (0.6/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain)
  Summer (DST) UTC−6 (MDT)
Congressional district 4th
Website bacacountyco.gov
Dust Storm in Baca County, 1935. Dust Storms, "Kodak view of a dusk storm Baca Co., Colorado, Easter Sunday 1935", Photo by N.R. Stone - NARA - 195659.tif
Dust Storm in Baca County, 1935.

Baca County is a county located in the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2010 census, the population was 3,788. [2] The county seat is Springfield. [3] It is located near the state borders with Kansas and Oklahoma.

Contents

History

Baca County was created by the Colorado legislature on April 16, 1889, out of eastern portions of Las Animas County. Baca County was named in honor of pioneer and Colorado territorial legislator Felipe Baca.

Prior to the 1880s there was little activity in the county, other than along the Cutoff Branch of the Santa Fe Trail that crosses its extreme southeastern corner. The 1910s saw wet years and expansion due to the increase in acreage that could be homesteaded. World War I also brought increased demand for agricultural products. The arrival of the Santa Fe Railroad in 1926 created new towns and a population increase.

The Dust Bowl arrived in the 1930s, with Baca County being one of the hardest hit areas. [4] This prompted soil conservation efforts by the federal government. Part of this effort was the purchase of cultivated land by the government in order to return it to grassland. Today the U.S. Forest Service supervises 220,000 acres of Comanche National Grassland which was purchased in the 1930s. These areas include Carrizo Creek and Picture Canyon. The Colorado Division of Wildlife maintains the recreational areas at Two Buttes Lake and Turk's Pond.

On May 18, 1977, an F4 tornado struck the southeastern portion of Baca County, causing an estimated $2.5 million in damage. It tracked from Keyes, Oklahoma, where damage was estimated at $25,000. [5] As of 2020, this is the only F4/EF4 tornado ever recorded in Colorado since 1950. [6] [7]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 2,557 square miles (6,620 km2), of which 2,555 square miles (6,620 km2) is land and 2.4 square miles (6.2 km2) (0.09%) is water. [8]

Adjacent counties

Major Highways

National historic trail

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1890 1,479
1900 759−48.7%
1910 2,516231.5%
1920 8,721246.6%
1930 10,57021.2%
1940 6,207−41.3%
1950 7,96428.3%
1960 6,310−20.8%
1970 5,674−10.1%
1980 5,419−4.5%
1990 4,556−15.9%
2000 4,517−0.9%
2010 3,788−16.1%
2019 (est.)3,581 [9] −5.5%
U.S. Decennial Census [10]
1790-1960 [11] 1900-1990 [12]
1990-2000 [13] 2010-2015 [2]

As of the census [14] of 2000, there were 4,517 people, 1,905 households, and 1,268 families residing in the county. The population density was 2 people per square mile (1/km2). There were 2,364 housing units at an average density of 1 per square mile (0/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 93.73% White, 0.04% Black or African American, 1.20% Native American, 0.15% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 2.99% from other races, and 1.79% from two or more races. 7.02% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 1,905 households, out of which 28.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.80% were married couples living together, 7.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.40% were non-families. 30.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 15.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.33 and the average family size was 2.90.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.50% under the age of 18, 5.90% from 18 to 24, 22.70% from 25 to 44, 24.50% from 45 to 64, and 22.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,099, and the median income for a family was $34,018. Males had a median income of $23,169 versus $18,292 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,068. About 12.90% of families and 16.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.60% of those under age 18 and 13.30% of those age 65 or over.

Infrastructure

The town is served by the Southeast Colorado Hospital. [15] Springfield Municipal Airport is located a few miles north of Springfield.

Politics

Like all of the High Plains, Baca County has long been overwhelmingly Republican. The last Democrat to carry the county was Lyndon Johnson in his 1964 landslide – when he carried all but three Colorado counties.

Presidential elections results
Baca County vote
by party in presidential elections
[16]
Year Republican Democratic Others
2020 83.9%1,86714.3% 3171.8% 41
2016 81.4%1,75313.1% 2835.4% 117
2012 74.0%1,55922.2% 4673.8% 80
2008 72.3%1,57224.6% 5363.1% 67
2004 76.9%1,68022.1% 4831.1% 23
2000 73.0%1,66323.3% 5313.7% 84
1996 59.5%1,32129.7% 65910.8% 239
1992 47.3%1,24027.7% 72625.0% 656
1988 65.3%1,67033.3% 8511.4% 35
1984 75.9%1,90323.1% 5801.0% 26
1980 74.3%1,99920.5% 5515.3% 142
1976 52.0%1,30346.4% 1,1641.6% 40
1972 73.9%1,64523.7% 5272.4% 53
1968 57.6%1,44128.7% 71913.7% 344
1964 47.4% 1,24152.2%1,3660.4% 11
1960 65.5%1,81534.3% 9520.2% 5
1956 59.6%1,71540.0% 1,1500.4% 11
1952 65.6%2,12233.8% 1,0940.6% 20
1948 47.5% 1,26051.6%1,3680.9% 24
1944 61.9%1,52838.1% 9410.0% 0
1940 56.5%1,56742.1% 1,1671.4% 38
1936 39.5% 1,28855.1%1,7975.5% 179
1932 34.0% 1,34956.7%2,2479.3% 369
1928 78.5%2,10819.5% 5242.0% 54
1924 46.4%1,17425.8% 65327.9% 706
1920 63.2%1,61527.2% 6959.6% 245
1916 35.0% 82654.9%1,29410.1% 238
1912 28.2% 31838.2%43033.6% 378

Communities

Town

Unincorporated communities

See also

Related Research Articles

Union County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

Union County is the northeasternmost county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 4,549, making it the fourth-least populous county in New Mexico. Its county seat is Clayton. The county was formed in 1894. Union County borders Colorado to the north, and Oklahoma and Texas to the east.

Santa Fe County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

Santa Fe County is located in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 144,170, making it New Mexico's third-most populous county, after Bernalillo County and Doña Ana County. Its county seat is Santa Fe, the state capital.

Colfax County, New Mexico County in New Mexico

Colfax County is a county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 13,750. Its county seat is Raton. It is south from the Colorado state line. This county was named for Schuyler Colfax (1823-1885), seventeenth Vice President of the United States under U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant.

Stanton County, Kansas County in Kansas

Stanton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kansas. As of the 2010 census, the county population was 2,235. Its county seat is Johnson City.

Morton County, Kansas County in Kansas

Morton County is a county in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state of Kansas. As of the 2010 census, the county population was 3,233. The largest city and county seat is Elkhart.

Saguache County, Colorado County in Colorado, United States

Saguache County is a county located in the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2010 census, the population was 6,108. The county seat is Saguache.

Prowers County, Colorado County in Colorado, United States

Prowers County is a county located in the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2010 census, the population was 12,551. The county seat is Lamar. The county is named in honor of John Wesley Prowers, a leading pioneer in the lower Arkansas valley region.

Otero County, Colorado County in Colorado, United States

Otero County is one of the 64 counties of the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2010 census, the population was 18,831. The county seat is La Junta. The county was named for Miguel Antonio Otero, one of the founders of the town of La Junta and a member of a prominent Hispanic family.

Las Animas County, Colorado County in Colorado, United States

Las Animas County is one of the 64 counties in the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2010 census, the population was 15,507. The county seat is Trinidad. The county takes its name from the Mexican Spanish name of the Purgatoire River, originally called El Río de las Ánimas Perdidas en el Purgatorio, which means "River of the Lost Souls in Purgatory."

Bent County, Colorado County in Colorado, United States

Bent County is one of the 64 counties of the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2010 census, the population was 6,499. The county seat and only incorporated municipality is Las Animas. The county is named in honor of frontier trader William Bent.

Campo, Colorado Statutory Town in State of Colorado, United States

Campo is a statutory town located in Baca County, Colorado, United States, with a population of 109 at the 2010 United States Census. The town is situated in the Great Plains, straddling U.S. Route 287/385.

Pritchett, Colorado Town in Colorado, United States

Pritchett is a Statutory Town in Baca County, Colorado, United States. The population was 140 at the 2010 census.

Springfield, Colorado Town in Colorado, United States

Springfield is a Statutory Town which is also the county seat and most populous town in Baca County, Colorado, United States. The population was 1,451 at the 2010 census.

Two Buttes, Colorado Town in State of Colorado, United States

The town of Two Buttes is a Statutory Town located in Baca County, Colorado, United States. The population was 43 at the 2010 census.

Vilas, Colorado Town in Colorado, United States

The town of Vilas is a Statutory Town located in Baca County, Colorado, United States. The population was 114 at the 2010 census.

Walsh, Colorado Town in Colorado, United States

Walsh is a Statutory Town in Baca County, Colorado, United States. The population was 546 at the 2010 census, down from 723 at the 2000 census.

Wagon Mound, New Mexico Village in New Mexico, United States

Wagon Mound is a village in Mora County, New Mexico, United States. It is named after and located at the foot of a butte called Wagon Mound, which was a landmark for covered wagon trains and traders going up and down the Santa Fe Trail and is now Wagon Mound National Historic Landmark. It was previously an isolated ranch that housed four families that served as local traders. The shape of the mound is said to resemble a Conestoga wagon. As of the 2010 census, the village population was 314. It was also called Santa Clara for many years. The village, with brightly painted houses and several stores and shops, is located on the plains of northeastern New Mexico. Interstate 25, which skirts the western side of town, gives a view of the majority of the town. Wagon Mound is not growing rapidly, but it has seen new construction along I-25, with new buildings on the northeast side of town as well.

Albion, Pennsylvania Borough in Pennsylvania, United States

Albion is a borough in Erie County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 1,516 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Erie Metropolitan Statistical Area. One of their main industries is the Albion State Correctional Institute.

Kimball, Tennessee Town in Tennessee, United States

Kimball is a town in Marion County, Tennessee, United States. The population was 1,312 at the 2000 census and 1,395 in 2010. It is part of the Chattanooga, TN–GA Metropolitan Statistical Area.

De Baca County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

De Baca County is a county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 2,022, making it New Mexico's second-least populous county. Its county seat is Fort Sumner. The county is named for Ezequiel Cabeza De Baca, the second elected Governor of New Mexico.

References

  1. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. August 15, 2017. Retrieved August 15, 2017.
  2. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 28, 2011. Retrieved February 10, 2014.
  3. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. Laskin, David (December 17, 2005). "Laying Bare Dust Bowl's Scar Tissue". The New York Times. Retrieved January 17, 2014.
  5. "Event 9987497". Storm Events Database. National Climatic Data Center . Retrieved August 13, 2016.
  6. "Colorado EF4+ tornado search". Storm Events Database. National Climatic Data Center. Archived from the original on August 20, 2016. Retrieved August 13, 2016.
  7. "All Colorado F4 tornadoes". Tornado History Project. Storm Prediction Center. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  8. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  9. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved December 3, 2019.
  10. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 7, 2014.
  11. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 7, 2014.
  12. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 7, 2014.
  13. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 7, 2014.
  14. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  15. "About us". Southeast Colorado Hospital District. 2019. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  16. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 26, 2017.

Coordinates: 37°19′N102°34′W / 37.32°N 102.56°W / 37.32; -102.56