Mesa County, Colorado

Last updated

Mesa County
Mesa County Court House.jpg
Mesa County Courthouse
Map of Colorado highlighting Mesa County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Colorado
Colorado in United States.svg
Colorado's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 39°01′N108°28′W / 39.02°N 108.47°W / 39.02; -108.47
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Colorado.svg  Colorado
FoundedFebruary 14, 1883
Named for mesas in the area
Seat Grand Junction
Largest cityGrand Junction
Area
  Total3,341 sq mi (8,650 km2)
  Land3,329 sq mi (8,620 km2)
  Water12 sq mi (30 km2)  0.4%%
Population
  Estimate 
(2019)
154,210
  Density44/sq mi (17/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain)
  Summer (DST) UTC−6 (MDT)
Congressional district 3rd
Website www.mesacounty.us
Mesa State Park.jpg

Mesa County is a county located in the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2010 census, the population was 146,723. [1] The county seat is Grand Junction. [2] The county was named for the many large mesas in the area, including Grand Mesa.

Contents

Mesa County comprises the Grand Junction, CO Metropolitan Statistical Area. [3] [4] In 2011 it ranked as the 269th most populous metropolitan area in the United States. [5] It is the only metropolitan area in Colorado not located on the Front Range of Colorado.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 3,341 square miles (8,650 km2), of which 3,329 square miles (8,620 km2) is land and 12 square miles (31 km2) (0.4%) is water. [6] It is the fourth-largest county by area in Colorado.

Adjacent counties

Major highways

National protected areas

State protected areas

Trails and byways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1890 4,260
1900 9,267117.5%
1910 22,197139.5%
1920 22,2810.4%
1930 25,90816.3%
1940 33,79130.4%
1950 38,79414.8%
1960 50,71530.7%
1970 54,7347.9%
1980 81,53049.0%
1990 93,14514.2%
2000 116,25524.8%
2010 146,72326.2%
2019 (est.)154,210 [7] 5.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [8]
1790-1960 [9] 1900-1990 [10]
1990-2000 [11] 2010-2015 [1]

As of the census [12] of 2010, there were 146,723 people, 58,095 households, and 38,593 families living in the county. The population density was 44.1 people per square mile (17.23.1/km2). There were 62,644 housing units. Information that follows comes from the 2000 American Factfinder data: The racial makeup of the county was 92.34% White, 0.46% Black or African American, 0.91% Native American, 0.53% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 3.67% from other races, and 1.99% from two or more races. 10.02% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 45,823 households, out of which 31.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.30% were married couples living together, 9.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.10% were non-families. 25.10% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.00% under the age of 18, 9.40% from 18 to 24, 26.70% from 25 to 44, 23.70% from 45 to 64, and 15.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 96.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $35,864, and the median income for a family was $43,009. Males had a median income of $32,316 versus $22,374 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,715. About 7.00% of families and 10.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.50% of those under age 18 and 8.10% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

Unlike most urban counties, Mesa County is powerfully Republican. It has voted Democratic only once since 1952, during Lyndon Johnson’s 1964 landslide, and Hubert Humphrey in the following 1968 election is the last Democrat to tally forty percent of the county’s vote.

It was reported in August 2021 that the Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters allowed an unauthorized person into a secure facility during an annual upgrade to the county's election equipment software, compromising the equipment. The security breach means Mesa County will not be able to use the equipment for its fall 2021 election. [13]

This was not the first time Ms. Peters has been a source of election controversy. In February 2020, it was discovered that Peters' office neglected to count 574 ballots cast in a dropbox outside her office. These uncounted ballots were cast in the November 2019 election and remained uncounted in the dropbox for 3 months. They were found only because Peters' office checked the dropbox for ballots cast in the next election - the 2020 presidential primary. This prompted an attempt to recall Tina Peters as county clerk. The effort was unsuccessful. [14]


Presidential election results
Mesa County vote
by party in presidential elections
[15] [16]
Year Republican Democratic Others
2020 62.8%56,89434.8% 31,5362.4% 2,193
2016 64.1%49,77928.0% 21,7297.9% 6,146
2012 65.1%47,47232.7% 23,8462.2% 1,629
2008 64.0%44,57834.5% 24,0081.5% 1,045
2004 67.1%41,53931.6% 19,5641.3% 782
2000 63.5%32,39630.3% 15,4656.3% 3,193
1996 53.1%24,76136.7% 17,11410.2% 4,737
1992 41.2%18,16934.4% 15,16224.4% 10,736
1988 59.6%22,15038.7% 14,3721.7% 633
1984 69.7%23,73629.2% 9,9381.2% 400
1980 68.9%22,68622.9% 7,5498.2% 2,681
1976 65.4%17,92432.2% 8,8072.4% 659
1972 68.7%15,52728.1% 6,3583.2% 728
1968 49.6%10,74540.5% 8,7759.9% 2,151
1964 39.5% 8,31760.3%12,7160.2% 49
1960 58.8%13,01541.0% 9,0720.2% 45
1956 62.8%12,86936.9% 7,5670.3% 60
1952 63.1%11,88336.5% 6,8830.4% 79
1948 43.4% 6,58655.3%8,4011.3% 198
1944 48.9% 6,65350.5%6,8700.6% 75
1940 47.3% 7,04951.6%7,6941.1% 169
1936 29.5% 3,65463.1%7,8247.4% 921
1932 37.2% 4,38856.6%6,6826.2% 737
1928 65.8%6,44632.9% 3,2231.4% 133
1924 45.5%4,05326.8% 2,38827.7% 2,461
1920 49.8%3,62143.2% 3,1387.0% 512
1916 30.1% 2,22359.4%4,39410.5% 778
1912 12.5% 97634.9% 2,73352.6% 4,115
1908 44.9%3,04941.6% 2,82413.6% 922
1904 58.5%2,78332.7% 1,5558.9% 423
1900 37.3% 1,31755.7%1,9687.1% 249
1896 15.8% 46980.0%2,3744.2% 123
1892 42.8% 52957.2%708
1888 49.5%44043.6% 3886.9% 61
1884 51.4%35347.9% 3290.7% 5

Communities

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated places

Transportation

Major Highways

Air

Train

Bus

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved June 8, 2014.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. "OMB Bulletin No. 10-02: Update of Statistical Area Definitions and Guidance on Their Uses" (PDF). Office of Management and Budget . December 1, 2009. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 21, 2017. Retrieved April 19, 2012 via National Archives.
  4. See the Colorado census statistical areas.
  5. "Table 1. Annual Estimates of the Population of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2009 (CBSA-EST2009-01)". 2009 Population Estimates. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. March 23, 2010. Archived from the original (CSV) on March 26, 2010. Retrieved March 29, 2010.
  6. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  7. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  8. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 8, 2014.
  9. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 8, 2014.
  10. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 8, 2014.
  11. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 8, 2014.
  12. "U.S. Census website" . Retrieved March 23, 2016.
  13. Birkeland, Bente After Data Is Posted On Conspiracy Website, Colo. County's Voting Machines Are Banned National Public Radio, August 12, 2021.
  14. Verlee, Megan ‘We Got Lucky’ That Missing Mesa Ballot Situation Wasn’t Worse, Elections Chief Says Colorado Public Radio, February 27, 2020.
  15. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 26, 2017.
  16. http://geoelections.free.fr/ . Retrieved January 13, 2021.Missing or empty |title= (help)

Coordinates: 39°01′N108°28′W / 39.02°N 108.47°W / 39.02; -108.47