Grand County, Colorado

Last updated

Grand County
Grand County Judicial Center.JPG
The Grand County Judicial Center in Hot Sulphur Springs, July 2016
Grand County co seal.png
Seal
Map of Colorado highlighting Grand County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Colorado
Colorado in United States.svg
Colorado's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 40°06′N106°07′W / 40.10°N 106.12°W / 40.10; -106.12 Coordinates: 40°06′N106°07′W / 40.10°N 106.12°W / 40.10; -106.12
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Colorado.svg  Colorado
FoundedFebruary 2, 1874
Named for Grand Lake and Grand River
Seat Hot Sulphur Springs
Largest town Granby
Area
  Total1,870 sq mi (4,800 km2)
  Land1,846 sq mi (4,780 km2)
  Water23 sq mi (60 km2)  1.2%%
Population
  Estimate 
(2019)
15,734
  Density8.0/sq mi (3.1/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain)
  Summer (DST) UTC−6 (MDT)
Congressional district 2nd
Website co.grand.co.us
Scenic vehicle entrance to Grand Lake Lodge (established 1919), included on the National Register of Historic Places Drive entrance to Grand Lake Lodge, Grand Lake, CO IMG 5383.JPG
Scenic vehicle entrance to Grand Lake Lodge (established 1919), included on the National Register of Historic Places

Grand County is a county located in the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,843. [1] The county seat is Hot Sulphur Springs. [2]

Contents

History

When Grand County was created February 2, 1874 it was carved out of Summit County and contained land to the western and northern borders of the state, which is in present-day Moffat County and Routt County. It was named after Grand Lake and the Grand River, [3] an old name for the upper Colorado River, which has its headwaters in the county. On January 29, 1877 Routt County was created and Grand County shrunk down to its current western boundary. When valuable minerals were found in North Park, Grand County claimed the area as part of its county, a claim Larimer County also held. It took a decision by the Colorado Supreme Court in 1886 to declare North Park part of Larimer County, setting Grand County's northern boundary.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,870 square miles (4,800 km2), of which 1,846 square miles (4,780 km2) is land and 23 square miles (60 km2) (1.2%) is water. [4]

Adjacent counties

Major Highways

National protected areas

Bicycle routes

Scenic byways

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 417
1890 60444.8%
1900 74122.7%
1910 1,862151.3%
1920 2,65942.8%
1930 2,108−20.7%
1940 3,58770.2%
1950 3,96310.5%
1960 3,557−10.2%
1970 4,10715.5%
1980 7,47582.0%
1990 7,9666.6%
2000 12,44256.2%
2010 14,84319.3%
2018 (est.)15,525 [5] 4.6%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
1790-1960 [7] 1900-1990 [8]
1990-2000 [9] 2010-2015 [1]

Demographics

At the 2000 census there were 12,442 people in 5,075 households, including 3,217 families, in the county. The population density was 7 people per square mile (3/km2). There were 10,894 housing units at an average density of 6 per square mile (2/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 95.15% White, 0.48% Black or African American, 0.43% Native American, 0.68% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 2.00% from other races, and 1.15% from two or more races. 4.36% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 23.8% were of German, 12.6% Irish, 10.0% English and 7.3% American ancestry. [10] Of the 5,075 households 28.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.70% were married couples living together, 5.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.60% were non-families. 24.80% of households were one person and 4.80% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.85.

The age distribution was 21.80% under the age of 18, 9.00% from 18 to 24, 34.70% from 25 to 44, 26.80% from 45 to 64, and 7.80% 65 or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 112.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 115.70 males.

The median household income was $47,759 and the median family income was $55,217. Males had a median income of $34,861 versus $26,445 for females. The per capita income for the county was $25,198. About 5.40% of families and 7.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.90% of those under age 18 and 6.10% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

Presidential elections results
Grand County vote
by party in presidential elections
[11]
Year Republican Democratic Others
2020 49.5%4,88347.7% 4,7102.8% 277
2016 52.3%4,49439.1% 3,3588.6% 736
2012 52.0%4,25345.0% 3,6843.1% 250
2008 49.7%4,12848.6% 4,0371.7% 144
2004 56.0%4,26042.6% 3,2431.4% 106
2000 56.2%3,57036.3% 2,3087.5% 475
1996 46.3%2,26441.2% 2,01212.6% 614
1992 35.9%1,76334.1% 1,67830.0% 1,477
1988 60.1%2,30637.8% 1,4512.1% 81
1984 72.7%2,86525.8% 1,0171.5% 58
1980 61.3%2,13323.6% 82015.2% 528
1976 61.8%1,70333.0% 9105.2% 144
1972 69.9%1,72127.8% 6852.2% 55
1968 67.4%1,16725.0% 4337.6% 132
1964 47.2% 81452.3%9020.5% 8
1960 62.6%1,10437.3% 6570.1% 2
1956 71.3%1,23928.6% 4960.1% 2
1952 70.3%1,33329.2% 5540.4% 8
1948 49.7%77748.9% 7631.4% 22
1944 63.5%96836.4% 5540.1% 2
1940 55.2%1,07444.4% 8630.5% 9
1936 45.5% 71454.0%8460.5% 8
1932 42.9% 59855.3%7711.9% 26
1928 62.2%77036.4% 4511.5% 18
1924 54.3%68124.6% 30821.1% 265
1920 52.5%64944.7% 5532.8% 34
1916 37.2% 37861.4%6241.5% 15
1912 25.8% 24852.7%50721.5% 207

Communities

The Fraser Valley in eastern Grand County is a key tourist area. Fraser Valley.jpg
The Fraser Valley in eastern Grand County is a key tourist area.

Towns

Census-designated places

Other

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved January 25, 2014.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. pp.  141.
  4. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  5. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved December 3, 2019.
  6. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 8, 2014.
  7. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 8, 2014.
  8. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 8, 2014.
  9. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 8, 2014.
  10. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  11. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 26, 2017.