Elections in Maine

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Election results in Maine comprise voting for local, gubernatorial and federal public offices, members of the state legislature, as well as ballot measures. Congressional elections are held every even year (2012, 2014, 2016), and gubernatorial ones every off-presidential even year (2010, 2014, 2018).

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The results of the elections are often varied. Maine is seen as a swing state, unusually high support for independent candidates. The Republican Party have won Maine in 11 out of the past 20 presidential elections, and the governorship has been won by Democrats and independents three times each, and Republicans four times, since 1974. [1] [2]

Maine has used the congressional district method for allocating electors in presidential elections continuously since the 1972 election. [3] Despite this, the winner of the state won all the congressional districts until 2016, when Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton won all but the 2nd district, which she lost to Republican Donald Trump, who would later go on to win the election. [4] [5]

Maine is the first and so far only state to have introduced ranked choice voting in elections, and is set to become the first to use it in a presidential election, in 2020. [6]

Voting method

Maine used the first-past-the-post voting system for all elections until 2017, until it was replaced with ranked choice voting when the Ranked Choice Voting Act was signed, after previously being approved by voters in a referendum in on November 8th, 2016. [7] The system was first used on June 12, 2018, in the primaries for the 2018 United States elections, and Maine became the first state to use ranked choice voting in a federal election on November 6th, 2018, when it was used in the main election itself. [8]

Since its enactment, numerous attempts have been made to repeal the act, or delay its effects. After the act was passed in 2016, legislators voted for the suspension of the law until December 2021. Thus making it inoperative until the 2022 United States elections. This was subsequently vetoed by voters, who gathered enough signatures on a petition to allow the system to be used. [9] [10] The state's senate took legal action to attempt to disallow the petition, but the Maine Supreme Court issued a ruling enabling ranked choice voting to be used in the 2018 election. [11] The Maine Republican party also attempted to block the use of the system in the 2020 United States elections via legal action, but the Maine Supreme Court dismissed the suit, which will make Maine the first state to use ranked choice voting in a presidential election. [12]

See also

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2018 Maine gubernatorial election

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June 2018 Maine Question 1

Maine Question 1 was a people's veto referendum that appeared on the June 12, 2018 statewide ballot. It sought to reject a law passed by the Maine Legislature that suspended the implementation of ranked choice voting, authorized by Maine voters in a previous referendum, for use in Maine elections until and if an amendment to the Maine Constitution is passed to expressly permit it; failing that, the law would be automatically repealed in 2021. It qualified because supporters of the original referendum collected the necessary number of signatures from registered Maine voters. This vote coincided with primary elections in which party nominees for governor, U.S. Senate, U.S. House, and the Maine Legislature were chosen through RCV to run in general elections on November 6.

2016 Maine Question 5 Citizen-initiated referendum question

Maine Question 5, formally An Act to Establish Ranked-Choice Voting, is a citizen-initiated referendum question that qualified for the Maine November 8, 2016 statewide ballot. It was approved by a vote of 52% in favor, 48% opposed. It sought to change how most Maine elections will be conducted from a plurality voting system to a ranked-choice voting system. It appeared on the ballot along with elections for President of the United States, Maine's two U.S. House seats, the legislature, five other ballot questions, and various local elections. The referendum was successful, making Maine the first state to use ranked choice voting for its federal elections.

2016 United States presidential election in Maine

The 2016 United States presidential election in Maine was held on November 8, 2016, as part of the 2016 United States presidential election in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia participated. Maine voters chose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote pitting the Republican Party's nominee, businessman Donald Trump, and running mate Indiana Governor Mike Pence against Democratic Party nominee, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and her running mate, Virginia Senator Tim Kaine.

2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Maine

The 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Maine were held on November 6, 2018, to elect the two U.S. Representatives from the state of Maine, one from each of the state's two congressional districts. The elections coincided with the elections of other offices, including a gubernatorial election, other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate, and various state and local elections.

2020 United States presidential election in Hawaii 59th United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 2020 United States presidential election in Hawaii was held on Tuesday, November 3, 2020, as part of the 2020 United States elections in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia will participate. Hawaii voters will choose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote. The state of Hawaii has 4 electoral votes in the Electoral College.

2020 United States presidential election in Maine 59th United States presidential election in Maine

The 2020 United States presidential election in Maine was held on Tuesday, November 3, 2020, as part of the 2020 United States presidential election in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia will participate. Maine voters will choose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote. The state of Maine has four electoral votes in the Electoral College. Unlike all other states except Nebraska, Maine awards two electoral votes based on the statewide vote, and one vote for each congressional district. In the 2016 election, Maine split its vote for the first time since 1828, awarding one electoral vote to Donald Trump as he got the most votes in Maine's 2nd congressional district.

2020 United States presidential election in Nebraska 59th United States presidential election in Nebraska

The 2020 United States presidential election in Nebraska was held on Tuesday, November 3, 2020, as part of the 2020 United States elections in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia will participate. Nebraska voters will choose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote. The state of Nebraska has 5 electoral votes in the Electoral College, 2 from the state at large, and 1 each from the three congressional districts.

2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Maine

The 2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Maine was held on November 3, 2020, to elect the two U.S. Representatives from the state of Maine, one from each of the state's two congressional districts. The elections will coincide with the 2020 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. The election will be conducted with ranked choice voting, as per the result of a referendum passed in 2016.

2020 Maine Democratic presidential primary

The 2020 Maine Democratic presidential primary took place in Maine, United States, on March 3, 2020, as one of 14 contests scheduled on Super Tuesday in the Democratic Party primaries for the 2020 presidential election, following the South Carolina primary the weekend before. The Maine primary was a closed primary, meaning that only registered Democrats could vote in this primary. The state awarded 32 delegates towards the 2020 Democratic National Convention, 24 of which are pledged delegates allocated based on the results of the primary. Although the primary was only open to party members, unenrolled voters were permitted to enroll in a party at the polls with same day registration.

2020 Maine Question 1 Peoples veto referendum on reversing removal of vaccination exemptions

Maine Question 1 was a people's veto referendum that appeared on the March 3, 2020 statewide ballot. It sought to reject a law passed by the Maine Legislature that eliminated most exemptions from state child vaccination requirements, including religious exemptions. It qualified due to opponents of the law collecting the necessary number of signatures from registered Maine voters. This vote coincided with the Democratic and Republican primary elections to pledge delegates to party conventions that will choose nominees for President of the United States to run in the U.S. presidential election in November.

Massachusetts Ranked-Choice Voting Initiative

Massachusetts Ranked-Choice Voting Initiative, also known as Question 2, is a planned initiative that has qualified for the 2020 Massachusetts general election ballot. The measure would change primaries and elections in Massachusetts from plurality voting to ranked-choice voting (RCV) for all Massachusetts statewide offices, state legislative offices, federal congressional offices, and certain other offices beginning in 2022. RCV would not be extended to elections for president, county commissioner, or regional district school committee member. If passed, Massachusetts would be become the second state to adopt ranked-choice voting for state and federal offices, following Maine's passage of Question 5 in 2016 and subsequent passage of Question 1 in June 2018. Other initiatives to enact ranked choice voting in 2020 include the Alaska Ballot Measure 2.

References

  1. "Maine Presidential Election Voting History". 270toWin.com. Retrieved 2020-09-14.
  2. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2020-09-14.
  3. "Split Electoral Votes in Maine and Nebraska". 270toWin.com. Retrieved 2020-09-14.
  4. "Split Electoral Votes in Maine and Nebraska". 270toWin.com. Retrieved 2020-09-14.
  5. "Maine Election Results 2016". The New York Times. 2017-08-09. ISSN   0362-4331 . Retrieved 2020-09-14.
  6. FairVote.org. "Timeline of RCV in Maine". FairVote. Retrieved 2020-09-14.
  7. "Citizens? Guide to the 2016 Maine Referendum Election available online". www.maine.gov. Retrieved 2020-09-19.
  8. FairVote.org. "Timeline of RCV in Maine". FairVote. Retrieved 2020-09-19.
  9. "Secretary Dunlap issues petitions for people's veto of ranked choice voting law". www.maine.gov. Retrieved 2020-09-19.
  10. "Ranked-choice voting people's veto effort found valid with 66,687 signatures". www.maine.gov. Retrieved 2020-09-19.
  11. "Supreme Court decision confirms Secretary Dunlap's plan to implement ranked-choice voting". www.maine.gov. Retrieved 2020-09-19.
  12. "Maine to use ranked voting for president after repeal fails". AP NEWS. 2020-07-15. Retrieved 2020-09-19.